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Eccentric Finger Extension With Resistance

http://www.kinesiologyprep.com -In this video, the motion of finger extension is occurring at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and interphalangeal (IP) joints. ...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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Finger Flexion

http://www.kinesiologyprep.com -In this video, the motion of finger flexion is occurring at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and interphalangeal (IP) joints. Th...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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Finger Intrinsic Plus

http://www.kinesiologyprep.com - In this video, the motion of the fingers beings at the extrinsic plus position with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint extensio...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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Finger Extension

http://www.kinesiologyprep.com -In this video, the motion of finger extension is occurring at the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints. This motion...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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BNPA 2014: Joint hypermobilty and autonomic hyperactivity

Stream BNPA 2014: Joint hypermobilty and autonomic hyperactivity by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 5 years ago
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Anatomy Modules

This is the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Horizontal Strand in Diagnostic Imaging educational website. Initially launched for the Johns Hopkins Radiology-Gross Anatomy Collaboration (MS1), it now has expanded to Neuroscience (MS1), Transition To Wards (MS2), PRECEDE for Clerkships (MS2,3,4), Resident joint procedure tutorials, Diagnostic Radiology Elective (MS3, MS4), Residency Match information (MS4), and more. This site is highly driven by the end users; feedback, comments, or suggestions are strongly welcome.  
teamrads.com
about 5 years ago
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Examination of the foot and ankle | Arthritis Research UK

With the patient on a couch and their feet overhanging the end of it, look at the feet, comparing for symmetry. In the forefoot look for nail changes and skin rashes. Look for the alignment of the toes and any evidence of hallux valgus of the big toe. Look for clawing of the toes, joint swelling and callus formation. Look at the underside or plantar surface for callus formation. Look at the patient’s shoes for asymmetrical wearing of the sole, the presence of insoles or other signs of poor fit.  
arthritisresearchuk.org
about 5 years ago
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Acromioclavicular Joint - Anatomy & Definition - Human Anatomy | Kenhub

Find more videos at: https://www.kenhub.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/VOEG2I The acromioclavicular joint, commonly called “The AC joint...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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Search results

A vacancy has arisen for an RCP member or fellow to join the Joint Clinical Neurosciences Committee (JCNC) which meets twice a year at the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in London. To be eligible you must have been appointed to your first consultant's post within the last 5 years and be a RCP London subscribing member.  
rcplondon.ac.uk
almost 5 years ago
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Search results

A vacancy has arisen for an RCP member or fellow to join the Joint Clinical Neurosciences Committee (JCNC) which meets twice a year at the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in London. To be eligible you must have been appointed to your first consultant's post within the last 5 years and be a RCP London subscribing member.  
rcplondon.ac.uk
almost 5 years ago
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Gout | Doctor | Patient

Gout can be defined as arthritis due to deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) monohydrate crystals within joints causing acute inflammation and eventual...  
Patient.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
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Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition - including Pseudogout | Doctor | Patient

Pseudogout is an inflammation of joints caused by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in articular and periarticular tissues. It is...  
Patient.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1nuvntv?1444774080
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Obesity Part 1 – Fat Kid in a Fat Society

Introduction to Obesity One of my favourite past-times is to sit in a bar, restaurant, café or coffee shop and people watch. I am sure many of you reading this also enjoying doing this too. People are fascinating and it is intriguing to observe: what they do; how they act; what they wear and what they look like. My family and I have always observed those around us and discussed interesting points about others that we have noticed. When I first came up to visit Birmingham University my family all sat in a coffee shop in the centre of Birmingham and noticed that on average the people walking past us looked much slimmer than what we were used to seeing back in south Wales. Now, when I go home it is more painfully obvious than ever that the people in my home region are much, much heavier than they should be and are noticeably bigger than they used to be even a short number of years ago. This change in the population around me is what first made me seriously think about obesity, as a major problem affecting the world today. Nowadays obesity is all around us! It is noticeable, it is spreading and it should worry us all. Not just for our own individual health but also for the health of our society. Obesity affects everything from the social dynamic of families, to relationships at school or work, to how much the NHS costs to run. Obesity is a massive problem and if we as a society don’t start getting to grips with it, then it will have huge implications for all of us! I am currently in my 5th year at medical school. While I have been here I have taken a keen interest in obesity. The physiology, the psychology, the anatomy, the statistics and the wider affects on society of obesity have all been covered in curriculum lectures and extra curriculum lectures. I have taken part in additional modules on these subjects and sort out many experts in this field while on hospital placements. Obesity is fascinating for some many reasons and I thought that it would be a great topic to write some blogs about and hopefully start some discussions. Warning For my first blog on the topic of obesity I quickly want to write a bit about myself and my battle with weight. Everyone’s favourite topic is themselves, but I like to think that’s not why I have written this and I hope it doesn’t come across as a narcissistic ramble. I don’t intend to try and make myself come off well or suggest that I have all the answers (because I know very well that I don’t) and I hope it doesn’t come across like that. I want to write a bit of an autobiography because I wish to demonstrate how easy it is to go from a chunky kid to a technically obese teenager to a relatively fat adult without really realising what was happening. Chunky Child to Fat adult While planning this blog I realised that my Meducation profile picture was taken when I was at my all time fattest. At the graduation ceremony at the end of my 3rd year at university after completing my intercalation I was over 19 stones. At 6 foot 2” this gave me a BMI of >33 which is clinically obese. I had a neck circumference of >18”, a chest circumference of 48”, a waist of >40”, a seat of >52” and a thigh circumference of >28” per leg. Why do I know all of these rather obscure measurements? Partly because I am quite obsessive but mainly because I had to go to buy a tailor made suit because I could no longer buy a suit from a shop that I could fit into and still be able to move in. The only options left to me where massive black tent-suits or to go to a tailors. After the graduation I sat down at my computer (whilst eating a block of cheese) and compared my face from the graduation photos to pictures I had taken at the start of university and the difference in shape and size was amazingly obvious. I had got fat! I realised that if I had a patient who was my age and looked like me with my measurements then I would tell him to lose weight for the good of his health. So, I decided that finally enough was enough and I that I should do something about it. Before I describe how I got on with the weight management I will quickly tell the back story of how I came to be this size. I have always been a big guy. I come from a big family. I have big bones. I had “puppy fat”. I was surrounded by people who ate too much, ate rubbish and were over weight themselves, so I didn’t always feel that there was anything wrong with carrying a bit of tub around the middle. When I went to comprehensive school at age 12 I had a 36” waist. I thought I carried the weight quite well because I was always tall and had big ribs I could sort of hide the soft belly. Soon after arriving at the new school I had put on more weight and for the first time in my life I started to get bullied for being fat! And I didn’t like it. It made me really self-aware and knocked my confidence. Luckily, we started being taught rugby in PE lessons and I soon found that being bigger, heavier and stronger than everyone else was a massive advantage. I soon got my own back on the bullies… there is nowhere to hide on a rugby field! This helped me gain my confidence and I realised that the only way to stop the bullying was to confront the bullies and to remake myself in such a way as that they would be unable to bully me. I decided to take up rugby and to start getting fit. I joined a local club, starting playing regularly, joined a gym and was soon looking less tubby. Reflecting (good medical jargon, check) on my life now I can see that my PE teachers saved me. By getting me hooked on rugby they helped get me into many other sports and physical activity in general and without their initial support I think my life would have gone very differently. Rugby was my saviour and also later on a bit of a curse. As I grew up I got bigger and bigger but also sportier. I started putting muscle on my shoulders, chest and legs which I was convinced hid how fat I actually was. I developed a body shape that was large but solid. I was convinced that although I was still carrying lots of excess weight I no longer looked tubby-fat. When I was 14 my PE teachers introduced me to athletics. They soon realised that I was built for shot putt and discuss throwing and after some initial success at small school competitions I joined a club and took it up seriously. At this age I had a waist of about 38” but was doing about 3-4 hours of exercise almost everyday, what with rugby, running, gym, swimming and athletics – in and out of school. My weight had by now increased to roughly 15 stones and my BMI was over 30. I was physically fit and succeeding at sport but still carrying quite a lot of fat. I no longer thought of myself as fat but I knew that other people did. Between the ages of 14 and 18 I started to be picked for regional teams in rugby and for international athletic competitions for Wales. My sporting career was going very well but the downside of this was that I was doing sports that benefited from me being heavier. So the better I got the heavier I wanted to become. I got to the stage where I was eating almost every hour and doing my best to put on weight. At the time I thought that I was putting on muscle and being a huge, toned sports machine. It took me a while to realise that actually my muscles weren't getting any bigger but my waist was! By the time I had completed my A-levels I was for the first time over 18 stones and had a waste of nearly 40”. So, at this point I was doing everything that I had been told that would make me more adapted for my sport and I was succeeding but without noticing it I was actually putting on lots of useless excess weight that in the long term was not good for me! During my first year of university I gave up athletics and decided that I no longer needed to be as heavy for my sports. This decision combined with living away from home, cooking for myself and walking over an hour a day to and from Uni soon began to bear fruit. By the summer of my first year at Uni, aged 19, I had for the first time in my life managed to control my weight. When I came to Uni I was 18 stone. After that first year I was down to 14 stone – a weight I had not been since I was 14 years old! I had played rugby for the Medical school during my first year but as a 2nd row/back row substitute. These positions needed me to be fit and not necessarily all that heavy and this helped me lose the weight. During my second year I began to start as a 2nd row and was soon asked to help out in the front row. I enjoyed playing these positions and again realised that I was pretty good at it and that extra weight would make me even better. So between 2nd year and the end of 3rd year I had put on nearly 5 stone in weight and this put me back to where I started at my graduation at the end of 3rd year. The ironic and sad thing is about all this that the fatter, less “good looking” and unhealthier I became, the better I was adapted for the sports I had chosen. It had never occurred to me that being good at competitive sports might actually be bad for my health. The Change and life lessons learnt At the beginning of my 4th year I had realised that I was fatter than I should be and had started to pick up a number of niggly injuries from playing these tough, body destroying positions in rugby. I decided that I would start to take the rugby less seriously and aim to stay fit and healthy rather than be good at a competitive sport. With this new attitude to life I resolved to lose weight. Over the course of the year there were a number of ups and downs. I firstly went back to all the men’s health magazines that I had stock piled over the years and started to work out where I was going wrong with my health. After a little investigation it became apparent that going running and working out in the gym was not enough to become healthy. If you want to be slim and healthy then your diet is far more important than what physical activity you do. My diet used to be almost entirely based on red meat and carbs: steak, mince, bacon, rice and pasta. Over the year I changed my diet to involve far more vegetables, more fibre, more fruit, more salad and way less meat! The result was that by Christmas 2012 I was finally back below 18 stones. The diet had started to have benefits. Then came exams! By the end of exams in April 2013 I had gone back up 19 stones and a waist of >40”. I was still spending nearly 2 hours a day doing weights in the gym and running or cycling 3 times a week. Even with all this exercise and a new self- awareness of my size, a terrible diet over the 3 week exam period had meant that I gained a lot of fat. After exams I went travelling in China for 3 weeks. While I was there I ate only local food and lots of coffee. Did not each lunch and was walking around exploring for over 6 hours a day. When I got back I was 17.5 stone, about 106kg. My waist had shrunk back down to 36” and I could fit into clothes I had not worn in years. This sudden weight loss was not explained by traveller’s diarrhoea or any increased activity above normal. What made me lose weight was eating a fairly healthy diet and eating far less calories than I normally would. I know this sounds like common sense but I had always read and believed that if you exercised enough then you could lose weight without having to decrease your calorie intake too much. I have always hated the sensation of being hungry and have always eaten regular to avoid this awful gnawing sensation. I had almost become hunger-phobic, always eating when given the opportunity just in case I might feel hungry later and not because I actually needed to eat. The time in China made me realise that actually I don’t NEED to eat that regularly and I don’t NEED to eat that much. I can survive perfectly ably without regular sustenance and have more than enough fat stores to live my life fully without needing to each too much. My eating had just become a habit, a WANT and completely unnecessary. After being home for a month I have had some ups and downs trying to put my new plans into action. Not eating works really easily in a foreign country, where it’s hot, you are busy and you don’t have a house full of food or relatives that want to feed you. I have managed to maintain my weight around 17.5 stones and kept my waist within 36” trousers. I am counting that as a success so far. The plan from now on is to get my weight down to under 16.5 stones because I believe that as this weight I will not be carrying too much excess weight and my BMI will be as close to “not obese” as it is likely to get without going on a starvation diet. I intend to achieve this goal by maintain my level of physical activity – at least 6 hours of gym work a week, 2 cardio sessions, tennis, squash, cycling, swimming and golf as the whim takes me. BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY, I intend to survive off far fewer calories with a diet based on bran flakes, salad, fruit, nuts, chicken and milk. I am hoping that this very simple plan will work! Conclusion Writing this short(-ish) autobiography was quite cathartic and I would really recommend it for other people who are trying to remake themselves. Its helped me put my thoughts in order. Over the years I wanted to lose weight because I wanted to look better. This desire has now matured into a drive to be not just slimmer but healthier; I no longer want to be slimmer just for the looks but also to reduce the pressure on my joints, to reduce the pressure on my cardiovascular system, to reduce my risks of being fat when I am older, to hopefully reduce the risk of dying prematurely and to some extent to make life cheaper – eating loads of meat to prevent hunger is expensive! I hope this blog has been mildly interesting, but also informative of just how easy it is for even a health conscious, sporty individual to become fat in our society. I also wanted to document how difficult it is to lose weight and maintain that new lower weight for any prolonged length of time. At some point I would like to do a blog on the best methods for weight loss but that may have to wait until I have found what works for me and if I do actually manage to achieve my goals. Would be a bit hypercritical to write such a blog while still having a BMI yo-yoing around 32 I feel! Thought for the day 1 - Gaining wait is easy, becoming fat is easy, losing fat is also technically easy! The hard part is developing AND then maintaining a healthy mental attitude towards your weight. The human body has evolved to survive starvation. We are almost perfectly made to build up high density fat stores just in case next year’s crops fail and we have to go a few months on broth. I will say it again – We are designed to survive hard conditions! The problem with the modern world and with modern society is that we no longer have to fight to survive. For the first time in human history food is no longer scarce… it is in fact incredibly abundant and cheap (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Z74og9HbTM). It is no surprise that when a human body is allowed to eat want and how much it craves and then do as little activity as possible, that it puts on fat very quickly. This has to be one of the major ironies of our age – When the human race has evolved society enough that we no longer need to have fat stores in case of disaster, that we are now the fattest humans have ever been! 2 – The best bit of advice I was ever given is this: “Diets ALWAYS fail! No matter what the diet or how determined you are, if you diet then within 2 years you will be the same weight or heavier than you are now. The only way to a healthy body is through a healthy LIFESTYLE CHANGE! You have to make changes that you are prepared to keep for a long time.”  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
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Cardiff University Research Society (CUReS) Annual Event

The Cardiff University Research Society (CUReS) held its second annual student research symposium on the 13th of November 2013 at the University Hospital of Wales. Medical students were invited to submit posters and oral presentations for the symposium. The event also launched this year’s INSPIRE program, a joint effort between Cardiff, Bristol, Exeter and Plymouth to give students connections to research groups through taster days and summer research programs. CUReS is a research society for medical students in Cardiff. All events and projects are completely free and available to all years. The research society has a particular focus on developing close bonds between researchers and students. In addition to INSPIRE, the society also releases a yearly list of summer research projects where medical students can find researchers interested in hosting projects over the summer. The purpose of the conference was to mark the launch of the INSPIRE taster days and display some of the impressive work that has been accomplished from the taster sessions and the funded summer projects. The symposium aims to give Cardiff medical students valuable experience in presenting their research and to motivate students interested in pursuing an academic career. CUReS president Huw Davies gave the opening speech, while INSPIRE lead Colin Dayan introduced the INSPIRE program. Previous INSPIRE students gave talks on their research and experiences gained from the program. Three successful applicants were invited to give oral presentations that were judged by the Cardiff Dean of Medicine Professor Paul Morgan, Professor Colin Dayan and Professor Julian Sampson, who also gave the keynote speech on his research. The symposium was a great success thanks to the enthusiastic medical students who presented posters and gave oral presentations on their research. First prize for an oral presentation was awarded to Georgiana Samoila for her work on Histological Diagnosis of Lung and Pleural Malignancies, while Lisa Roberts and Jason Chai were awarded runner-ups. The award for best poster was given to Thomas Lemon. Two further awards sponsored by Meducation, assessed by Peter Winter, were given to George Kimpton and Ryan Preece for their poster presentations. There was also a Meducation stall and the Cardiff University Research Society greatly appreciates the support. To get in touch with the CUReS, please email cures@cardiff.ac.uk or visit our website at www.cu-res.co.uk for more information. Written by Robert Lundin  
Nicole Chalmers
about 6 years ago
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572

Dementia: A reflection from an Egyptian Perspective

Through different periods of the Egyptian history from Pharaonic, Greco-Roman, Coptic, Islamic and Modern Era; Egyptians tend to respect, appreciate and care for elderly. There is also a rich Eastern Christian tradition in respecting and taking care of old people that has continued since the first centuries of Christianity. Churches used to develop retirement homes served by monastic personnel and nurses. Egyptian culture traditionally linked some aspects of mental illnesses to sin, possession of evil, separation from the divine and it is usually associated with stigmatisation for all family members. However, forgetfulness with ageing was normalised. Until now, it seems that the difference between normal ageing and dementia is blurred for some people. Recently, the term 'Alzheimer' became popular, and some people use it as synonymous to forgetfulness. El-Islam, stated that some people erroneously pronounce it as 'Zeheimer' removing the 'Al' assuming it is the Arabic equivalent to the English 'the'. In 2010, a film was produced with the title 'Zeheimer' confirming the mispronunciation. Elderly face many health challenges which affect their quality of life. Dementia is one of these challenges as it is considered to be one of the disorders which attack elderly and affect their memory, mental abilities, independence, decision making and most cognitive functions. Therefore, the focus on dementia has increased around the world due to the rapid spread of the syndrome and the economical and psychosocial burden it cause for patients, families and communities. (Grossber and Kamat 2011, Alzheimer’s Association 2009, Woods et al. 2009). In recent years, the proportion of older people is increasing due to the improvement in health care and scientific development. The demographic transition with ageing of the population is a global phenomenon which may demand international, national, regional and local action. In Egypt the ageing population at the age of 65 and older are less than 5% of the Egyptian population (The World FactBook, 2012), yet, the World Health Organization (WHO) asserts that a demographic shift is going to happen as most of the rapid ageing population will transfer to the low and middle income countries in the near future (WHO, 2012). Egyptian statistics assert this shift. The Information Decision Support Center published the first comprehensive study of the elderly in Egypt in 2008. According to the report, in 1986, 5 percent of Egyptians were age 60 and older. In 2015, they will make up to 11 percent of the population and in 2050; over a fifth. Caring of older persons constitutes an increasing segment of the Egyptian labor market. However, nation wide statistics about number of dementia sufferers in Egypt may be unavailable but the previous demographic transition is expected to be accompanied by an increase in dementia patients in Egypt and will affect priorities of health care needs as well. The Egyptian society may need adequate preparation with regards to health insurance, accommodation and care homes for the upcoming ageing population (El-Katatney, 2009). Although the number of care home increased from 29 in 1986 to be around 140 home in 2009; it cannot serve more than 4000 elderly from a total of 5 million. Not every elderly will need a care home but the total numbers of homes around Egypt are serving less than 1% of the elderly population. These facts created a new situation of needs for care homes besides the older people who are requiring non-hospital health care facility for assisted living. The Egyptian traditions used to be strongly associated with the culture of extended family and caring for elderly as a family responsibility. Yet, in recent years changes of the economic conditions and factors as internal and external immigration may have affected negatively on elderly care within family boundaries. There is still the stigma of sending elderly to care homes. Some perceive it as a sign of intolerance of siblings towards their elderly parents but it is generally more accepted nowadays. Therefore, the need for care homes become a demand at this time in Egypt as a replacement of the traditional extended family when many older people nowadays either do not have the choice or the facilities to continue living with their families (El-Katatney 2009). Many families among the Egyptian society seem to have turned from holding back from the idea of transferring to a care home to gradual acceptance since elderly care homes are becoming more accepted than the past and constitutes a new concept of elderly care. Currently, many are thinking to run away from a lonely empty home in search of human company or respite care but numbers of geriatric homes are extremely lower than required and much more are still needed (Abdennour, 2010). Thus, it seems that more care homes may be needed in Egypt. Dementia patients are usually over 65, this is one of the factors that put them at high risk of exposure to different physical conditions related to frailty, old age, and altered cognitive functions. Additionally, around 50% of people with dementia suffers from other comorbidities which affect their health and increases hospital admissions (National Audit Office 2007). Therefore, it is expected that the possibility of doctors and nurses needing to provide care for dementia patients in various care settings is increasing (RCN 2010). Considering previous facts, we have an urgent need in Egypt to start awareness about normal and upnormal ageing and what is the meaning of dementia. Moreover, change of health policies and development of health services is required to be developed to match community needs. Another challenge is the very low number of psychiatric doctors and facilities since the current state of mental health can summarised as; one psychiatrist for every 67000 citizens and one psychiatric hospital bed for every 7000 citizens (Okasha, 2001). Finally the need to develop gerontologically informed assessment tools for dementia screening to be applied particularly in general hospitals (Armstrong and Mitchell 2008) would be very helpful for detecting dementia patients and develop better communication and planning of care for elderly. References: El Katateny, E. 2009. Same old, same old: In 2050, a fifth of Egyptians will be age 60 and older. How will the country accommodate its aging population?. Online available at: http://etharelkatatney.wordpress.com/category/egypt-today/page/3/ Fakhr-El Islam, M. 2008. Arab culture and mental health care. Transcultural Psychiatry, vol. 45, pp. 671-682 Ageing and care of the elderly. Conference of European churches. 2007. [online] available at: http://csc.ceceurope.org/fileadmin/filer/csc/Ethics_Biotechnology/AgeingandCareElderly.pdf World Health Organization. 2012 a. Ageing and life course: ageing Publications. [Online] available at : http://www.who.int/ageing/publications/en/ World Health Organization. 2012 b. Ageing and life course: interesting facts about ageing. [Online] available at: http://www.who.int/ageing/about/facts/en/index.html World Health Organization 2012 c. Dementia a public health priority. [online] available at: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2012/9789241564458_eng.pdf World Health Organization. 2012 d. Why focus on ageing and health, now?. Department of Health. 2009. Living well with dementia: a national dementia strategy. [Online] available at: http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_094058 Andrawes, G., O’Brien, L. and Wilkes, L. 2007. Mental illness and Egyptian families. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol.16, pp. 178-187 National Audit Office. 2007. Improving service and support for people with dementia. London. [online[ Available at: http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/0607/support_for_people_with_dement.aspx Armstrong, J and Mitchell, E. 2008. Comprehensive nursing assessment in the care of older people. Nursing Older People, vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 36-40. Okasha, A. 2001. Egyptian contribution to the concept of mental health. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal,Vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 377-380. Woods, R., Bruce, E., Edwards, R., Hounsome, B., Keady, J., Moniz-Cook, E., Orrell, M. and Tussell, I. 2009. Reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family carers: pragmatic eight-centre randomised trial of joint reminiscence and maintenance versus usual treatment: a protocol. Trials Journal: open access, Vol. 10, [online] available at: http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/10/1/64 Grossberg, G. and Kamat, S. 2011. Alzheimer’s: the latest assessment and treatment strategies. Jones and Bartlett, publisher: The United States of America. Alzheimer’s Association. 2009. 2009 Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, Volume 5, Issue 3. [online] Available at: http://www.alz.org/news_and_events_2009_facts_figures.asp Royal College of Nursing. 2010. Improving quality of care for people with dementia in general hospitals. London. National Audit Office. 2007. Improving service and support for people with dementia. London. [online[ Available at: http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/0607/support_for_people_with_dement.aspx Authors: Miss Amira El Baqary, Nursing Clinical instructor, The British University in Egypt 10009457@qmu.ac.uk Dr Emad Sidhom, MBBCh, ABPsych-Specialist in Old Age Psychiatry-Behman Hospital e.sidhom@behman.com  
Amira El Baqary
almost 6 years ago
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2
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Red Flags

Red Flags typically refer to features that may suggest serious life threatening disease such as malignancy (leukaemia), infection (septic arthritis or osteomyelitis) or non-accidental injury. We also include features that may suggest inflammatory joint or muscle disease.  
pmmonline.org
over 4 years ago
10
1
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#StudentLedChange NHS Change Day Campaign - Do you want to make your voice heard?

Are you a student, junior doctor, trainee or other healthcare professional? Do you want to make a difference to patient care? If you anwsered "yes" to both of those questions, then please do contact the #StudentLedChange team. We want to invite you all to join the campaign and put all of our enthusiasm together to make a real difference to patient care. To contact us: Search Twitter or Facebook for #StudentLedChange @QuID_UK or email quid.editor@gmail.com http://changeday.nhs.uk/campaigns/studentledchange/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/1588447701402451/ http://www.quid.org.uk/all-ongoing-projects/on-going-projects/item/52-using-projectmatch-org-to-develop-better-regional-project-banks-for-students-and-trainees-studentledchange http://www.projectmatch.org/ Our main aims are: 1) To harness the enthusiasm of juniors to improve patient care 2) To reduce the barriers to research and quality improvement projects that juniors often run into - such as not knowing any enthusiastic supervisors - via www.projectmatch.org 3) To increase the sharing of small scale projects and new ideas - via www.quid.org.uk 4) To build a vibrant community of like minded individuals via social media - please joint he discussions today 5) Our last aim is rather ambitious, we want to encourage all of the organisations involved in patient care improvement to work more closely together. We want there to be more collaborative projects that students can get involved in and we want to make it easier for students to know who to contact and where to start. We also want to help other students achieve their aims by collaborating together. If you would like to help with any of the above then please do get in contact... Originally posted on: http://doc2doc.bmj.com/forums/open-clinical_quality-safety_studentledchange-nhs-change-day-campaign-want-involved  
jacob matthews
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
18

Advancing equity in healthcare

Healthcare reforms in Massachusetts that began in 2006 might foreshadow the effects of President Obama’s national Affordable Care Act and have been subject to intense scrutiny as a result. Two linked studies of the reforms in Massachusetts indicate that expanding of health insurance is helpful but not enough to eliminate important social and ethnic disparities in care and outcomes.1 2 Hanchate and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h440) studied joint replacement surgery, an effective treatment for end stage joint disease that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life3 but is underused among patients on low incomes and those from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds.4 In their study, greater access to health insurance in Massachusetts was associated with increased rates of knee and hip replacement surgery among Hispanic and black people compared with white people but was not associated with increased rates among people on low incomes relative to richer people.1 In a second study, McCormick and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h1480) found no association between Massachusetts healthcare reforms and reduced racial and ethnic disparities in admissions to hospital for diseases such as asthma, diabetes, and heart failure. Many admissions for these “ambulatory care sensitive conditions” are preventable if patients have access to high quality outpatient …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
12

Advancing equity in healthcare

Healthcare reforms in Massachusetts that began in 2006 might foreshadow the effects of President Obama’s national Affordable Care Act and have been subject to intense scrutiny as a result. Two linked studies of the reforms in Massachusetts indicate that expanding of health insurance is helpful but not enough to eliminate important social and ethnic disparities in care and outcomes.1 2 Hanchate and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h440) studied joint replacement surgery, an effective treatment for end stage joint disease that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life3 but is underused among patients on low incomes and those from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds.4 In their study, greater access to health insurance in Massachusetts was associated with increased rates of knee and hip replacement surgery among Hispanic and black people compared with white people but was not associated with increased rates among people on low incomes relative to richer people.1 In a second study, McCormick and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h1480) found no association between Massachusetts healthcare reforms and reduced racial and ethnic disparities in admissions to hospital for diseases such as asthma, diabetes, and heart failure. Many admissions for these “ambulatory care sensitive conditions” are preventable if patients have access to high quality outpatient …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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14

Advancing equity in healthcare

Healthcare reforms in Massachusetts that began in 2006 might foreshadow the effects of President Obama’s national Affordable Care Act and have been subject to intense scrutiny as a result. Two linked studies of the reforms in Massachusetts indicate that expanding of health insurance is helpful but not enough to eliminate important social and ethnic disparities in care and outcomes.1 2 Hanchate and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h440) studied joint replacement surgery, an effective treatment for end stage joint disease that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life3 but is underused among patients on low incomes and those from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds.4 In their study, greater access to health insurance in Massachusetts was associated with increased rates of knee and hip replacement surgery among Hispanic and black people compared with white people but was not associated with increased rates among people on low incomes relative to richer people.1 In a second study, McCormick and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h1480) found no association between Massachusetts healthcare reforms and reduced racial and ethnic disparities in admissions to hospital for diseases such as asthma, diabetes, and heart failure. Many admissions for these “ambulatory care sensitive conditions” are preventable if patients have access to high quality outpatient …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago