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29629
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39

Mental Status Examination (normal)

Mental Status Normal examinatio SECTION Orientation, Memory vide Attention-working memory vide Judgement-abstract reasoning vide Set generation vide Receptive language vide Expressive language vide Praxis vide Gnosis vide Dominant parietal lobe function vide Non-dominant parietal lobe function vide Visual recognition video With thanks to the authors and contributors to the NeuroLogic Exam website (http://medstat.med.utah.edu/neurologicexam) and Pediatric NeuroLogic Exam website (http://medstat.med.utah.edu/pedineurologicexam) retain copyright to all material, including movies, and request acknowledgement whenever it is used.  
Neurologic Exam
over 10 years ago
29746
1
54

Mental Status Abnormal

Orientation, Memor This patient has difficulty with orientation questions. The day of the week is correct but he misses the month and date. He is oriented to place. Orientation mistakes are not localizing but can be due to problems with memory, language, judgement, attention or concentration. The patient has good recent memory (declarative memory) as evidenced by the recall of three objects but has difficulty with long term memory as evidenced by the difficulty recalling the current and past presidents. Attention-working memor The patient has difficulty with digit span backwards, spelling backwards and giving the names of the months in reverse order. This indicates a problem with working memory and maintaining attention, both of which are frontal lobe functions. Judgement-abstract reasoning The patient gives the correct answer for a house on fire and his answers for similarities are also good. He has problems with proverb interpretation. His answers are concrete and consist of rephrasing the proverb or giving a simple consequence of the action in the proverb. Problems with judgement, abstract reasoning, and executive function can be seen in patients with frontal lobe dysfunction. Set generatio Set generation tests word fluency and frontal lobe function. The patient starts well but abruptly stops after only four words. Most individuals can give more then 10 words in one minute. Receptive languag Patients with a receptive aphasia (Wernicke’s) cannot comprehend language. Their speech output is fluent but is devoid of meaning and contains nonsense syllables or words (neologisms). Their sentences are usually lacking nouns and there are paraphasias (one word substituted for another). The patient is usually unaware of their language deficit and prognosis for recovery is poor. This patient’s speech is fluent and some of her sentences even make sense but she also has nonsense sentences, made up of words and parts of words. She can’t name objects (anomia). She doesn’t have a pure or complete receptive aphasia but pure receptive aphasias are rare. Expressive languag This patient with expressive aphasia has normal comprehension but her expression of language is impaired. Her speech output is nonfluent and often limited to just a few words or phases. Grammatical words such as prepositions are left out and her speech is telegraphic. She has trouble saying “no ifs , ands or buts”. Her ability to write is also effected Patients with expressive aphasia are aware of their language deficit and are often frustrated by it. Recovery can occur but is often incomplete with their speech consisting of short phrases or sentences containing mainly nouns and verbs. Praxi The patient does well on most of the tests of praxis. At the very end when he is asked to show how to cut with scissors he uses his fingers as the blades of the scissors instead of acting like he is holding onto the handles of the scissors and cutting. This can be an early finding of inferior parietal lobe dysfunction. Gnosi With his right hand the patient has more difficulty identifying objects then with his left hand. One must be careful in interpreting the results of this test because of the patient’s motor deficits but there does seem to be astereognosis on the right, which would indicate left parietal lobe dysfunction. This is confirmed with graphesthesia where he definitely has more problems identifying numbers written on the right hand then the left (agraphesthesia of the right hand). Dominant parietal lobe functio This patient has right-left confusion and difficulty with simple arithmetic. These are elements of the Gertsmann syndrome, which is seen in lesions of the dominant parietal lobe. The full syndrome consists of right-left confusion, finger agnosia, agraphia and acalculia.  
Neurologic Exam
over 10 years ago
29748
2
107

Cranial Nerves Examination - Normal

Orientation, Memor Asking questions about month, date, day of week and place tests orientation, which involves not only memory but also attention and language. Three-word recall tests recent memory for which the temporal lobe is important. Remote memory tasks such as naming Presidents, tests not only the temporal lobes but also heteromodal association cortices. Attention-working memory Digit span, spelling backwards and naming months of the year backward test attention and working memory which are frontal lobe functions Judgement-abstract reasoning These frontal lobe functions can be tested by using problem solving, verbal similarities and proverbs Set generation This is a test of verbal fluency and the ability to generate a set of items which are frontal lobe functions. Most individuals can give 10 or more words in a minute. Receptive language Asking the patient to follow commands demonstrates that they understand the meaning of what they have heard or read. It is important to test reception of both spoken and written language. Expressive language In assessing expressive language it is important to note fluency and correctness of content and grammar. This can be accomplished by tasks that require spontaneous speech and writing, naming objects, repetition of sentences, and reading comprehension. Praxis The patient is asked to perform skilled motor tasks without any nonverbal prompting. Skills tested for should involve the face then the limbs. In order to test for praxis the patient must have normal comprehension and intact voluntary movement. Apraxia is typically seen in lesions of the dominant inferior parietal lobe. Gnosis Gnosis is the ability to recognize objects perceived by the senses especially somatosensory sensation. Having the patient (with their eyes closed) identify objects placed in their hand (stereognosis) and numbers written on their hand (graphesthesia) tests parietal lobe sensory perception. Dominant parietal lobe function Tests for dominant inferior parietal lobe function includes right-left orientation, naming fingers, and calculations. Non-dominant parietal lobe function The non-dominant parietal lobe is important for visual spatial sensory tasks such as attending to the contralateral side of the body and space as well as constructional tasks such as drawing a face, clock or geometric figures. Visual recognition Recognition of colors and faces tests visual association cortex (inferior occiptotemporal area). Achromatopsia (inability to distinguish colors), visual agnosia (inability to name or point to a color) and prosopagnosia (inability to identify a familiar faces) result from lesions in this area.  
Neurologic Exam
over 10 years ago
Preview
2
41

The Ultimate OphthalmoloGAME

Players compete using their knowledge of Ophthalmology for the honour of the Ultimate OphthalmoloGAME trophy pictured in the centre of the board Rules 1. Before rolling the die, players must complete an ophthalmology based challenge 2. The type of challenge the player must complete is dependent on the colour that their piece is on at the beginning of their turn 3. All players begin on Dark Purple (Multiple Choice Question 3. Categories are as follows Blue: Visual challenge, competitor looks into one of 5 randomly selected cups and must identify the type of retinal pathology as would be seen when using ophthalmoscopy Lilac: Case based question, clinical judgement question based on features of history and examinatio Silver: Eye Pictionary, other competitors must guess the ophthalmology related word via the competitor's artistic skill Dark purple: Multiple choice question, competitor must correctly select the answer to an ophthalmology based questio 4. If the competitor successfully completes their challenge, they are allowed to roll the die and move their piece forward accordingly 5. However, if the competitor fails to complete their challenge, they are not permitted to move forward and must complete a challenge of the same category on their next turn 6. The winner of the Ultimate Ophthalmology trophy is the first player to make a full circuit of the iris, reaching the pupil in doing so.  
Emma Papworth
about 10 years ago
Preview 300x225
3
61

The Ultimate OphthalmoloGAME

Players compete using their knowledge of Ophthalmology for the honour of the Ultimate OphthalmoloGAME trophy pictured in the centre of the board. Rules 1. Before rolling the die, players must complete an ophthalmology based challenge 2. The type of challenge the player must complete is dependent on the colour that their piece is on at the beginning of their turn 3. All players begin on Dark Purple (Multiple Choice Question 3. Categories are as follows Blue: Visual challenge, competitor looks into one of 5 randomly selected cups and must identify the type of retinal pathology as would be seen when using ophthalmoscopy Lilac: Case based question, clinical judgement question based on features of history and examinatio Silver: Eye Pictionary, other competitors must guess the ophthalmology related word via the competitor's artistic skill Dark purple: Multiple choice question, competitor must correctly select the answer to an ophthalmology based questio 4. If the competitor successfully completes their challenge, they are allowed to roll the die and move their piece forward accordingly 5. However, if the competitor fails to complete their challenge, they are not permitted to move forward and must complete a challenge of the same category on their next turn 6. The winner of the Ultimate Ophthalmology trophy is the first player to make a full circuit of the iris, reaching the pupil in doing so.  
Emma Papworth
about 10 years ago
Preview
1
131

Harry Burns: 'We need compassion, not judgments about poor people' | Peter Hetherington

Peter Hetherington: Scotland's retiring chief medical officer still wants to make the country a healthier place and stresses the connections between dire social conditions and ill health  
the Guardian
about 7 years ago
Www.bmj
1
14

Deprivation of liberty in healthcare

The right to liberty in UK healthcare has been greatly strengthened this year. In March, the House of Lords Select Committee on the Mental Capacity Act (2005) published a report that severely criticised inconsistent safeguarding provisions for patients without mental capacity who are deprived of their liberty.1 Later that month, the UK Supreme Court gave judgment in a case “Cheshire West,” which involved three adults with severe learning disability and answered the general question “what is a deprivation of liberty?”2  
bmj.com
about 7 years ago
Www.bmj
1
26

NHS is not (yet) in crisis, but what about school rugby?

If a crisis is the point of judgment, the nadir, the turning point, the NHS in England can’t yet be judged to be in crisis, said John Appleby of the health think tank the King’s Fund in a BBC interview this week, because things may well get worse (doi:10.1136/bmj.h50). This is hardly reassuring but probably realistic. Hospitals around the country are declaring “major incidents” because of a lack of beds or staff or both, emergency departments report that they are at breaking point, and general practice is under unprecedented pressure (doi:10.1136/bmj.h66, doi:10.1136/bmj.g7266, doi:10.1136/bmj.g6069, doi:10.1136/bmj.g6040). And there is little sign yet of things improving. Less realistic but more palatable is the belief of NHS England’s chief executive, Simon Stevens, that the £30bn (funding gap expected for 2020-21 can be narrowed to £8bn. This is magical thinking, says Nigel Hawkes (doi:10.1136/bmj.g7842).  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
6
0
14

What changes are going to be made for students applying for foundation posts from 2012 onwards?

What are the changes that are going to be made by the UKFPO for students applying for foundation posts from 2012 onwards? So many rumours are being spread about the changes that are going to come in to the new MTAS form, so I thought readers may want to share and comment, and perhaps we can all get a better idea of what is happening from those who are better informed. I have heard lots of things, so thought I would list them. If anyone has heard different, please correct me! First of all, changes are to be made for those applying the year after next, ie. to be an FY1 in 2013. I have also heard that this may be delayed until the following year, however. 'White space questions' are to be removed from the form. This is to avoid the disparity between those who get help to fill them in and those who complete the form themselves A 'situational judgement test will be introduced nationally. This aims to assess candidates ability to make the right decision in clinical scenarios with ethical considerations Points may no longer be given for extra-curricular activities/ qualifications any more. Including previous degrees, intercalated degrees, publications and presentations. This is all speculation and I don't claim any of the above to be true. It is interesting to see if anyone else has heard similar things though.  
Johnny Berger
over 10 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 e7fpn8?1444774293
3
372

The Importance Of Clinical Skills

In the USA the issue of indiscriminate use of expensive, sophisticated, and time consuming test in lieu of, rather than in addition to, the clinical exam is being much discussed. The cause of this problem is of course multifactorial. One of the factors is the decline of the teaching of clinical skills to our medical students and trainees. Such problems seem to have taken hold in developing countries as well. Two personal anecdotes will illustrate this. In the early nineties I worked for two years as a faculty member in the department of ob & gyn at the Aga Khan University Medical School in Karachi, Pakistan. One day, I received a call from the resident in the emergency room about a woman who had come in because of some abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. While the resident told me these two symptoms her next sentence was: “… and the pelvic ultrasound showed…” I stopped her right in her tracks before she could tell me the result of the ultrasound scan. I told her: “First tell me more about this patient. Does she look ill? Is she bleeding heavily? Is she in a lot of pain and where is the pain? What are her blood pressure and pulse rate? How long has she been having these symptoms? When was her last menstrual period? What are your findings when you examined her ? What is the result of the pregnancy test?”. The resident could not answer most of these basic clinical questions and findings. She had proceeded straight to a test which might or might not have been necessary or even indicated and she was not using her clinical skills or judgment. In another example, the resident, also in Karachi, called me to the emergency room about a patient with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. He told me that the patient was pale, and obviously bleeding inside her abdomen and on the verge of going into shock. The resident had accurately made the diagnosis, based on the patient’s history, examination, and a few basic laboratory tests. But when I ran down to see the patient, he was wheeling the patient into the radiology department for an ultrasound. "Why an ultrasound?" I asked. “You already have made the correct diagnosis and she needs an urgent operation not another diagnostic procedure that will take up precious time before we can stop the internal bleeding.” Instead of having the needless ultrasound, the patient was wheeled into the operating room. What I am trying to emphasize is that advances in technology are great but they need to be used judiciously and young medical students and trainees need to be taught to use their clinical skills first and then apply new technologies, if needed, to help them to come to the right diagnosis and treatment. And of course we, practicing physicians need to set the example. Or am I old fashioned and not with it? Medico legal and other issues may come to play here and I am fully aware of these. However the basic issue of clinical exam is still important. Those wanting to read more similar stories can download a free e book from Smashwords. The title is: "CROSSCULTURAL DOCTORING. ON AND OFF THE BEATEN PATH." You can access the e book here.  
DR William LeMaire
almost 7 years ago
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0
11

How to Listen Beyond The Words

How to Listen Beyond the Words https://www.owners-guide.com/online-consultation/ =============================================== Listening without judgement,...  
youtube.com
about 6 years ago
Preview
0
15

Why putting off big decisions could give you a heart attack

People who procrastinate are more likely to suffer heart disease than those who make their minds up quickly, a study claims, because they become more stressed when they finally make a judgment.  
dailymail.co.uk
about 6 years ago
Preview
-1
50

Guess or Gestalt in Major Trauma at St.Emlyn's - St.Emlyn's

I was recently fortunate enough to speak at the the Emergency Medicine Educators Conference in Coventry on a subject that continues to interest me, that of gestalt, judgement and clinical decision making. As I get older I increasingly realise that simply acquiring more knowledge and skills is not enough. What’s really important is how we use that information, how we make decisions, how we make mistakes and how we get it right. I’m also deep in my preparations for a talk at #SMACCUS on ‘Guess, Gestalt or Genius’ and so I’m always on the look out for studies in this area (as there are surprising few). In my talk in Coventry I used the question of when to activate the Major Haemorrhage Protocol (1:1:1 resuscitation as per PROPPR) in trauma patients. Clearly not all patients need it and there are potential harms if we use it on the wrong patients.  
stemlynsblog.org
about 6 years ago
Preview
0
15

Guess or Gestalt in Major Trauma at St.Emlyn's - St.Emlyn's

I was recently fortunate enough to speak at the the Emergency Medicine Educators Conference in Coventry on a subject that continues to interest me, that of gestalt, judgement and clinical decision making. As I get older I increasingly realise that simply acquiring more knowledge and skills is not enough. What’s really important is how we use that information, how we make decisions, how we make mistakes and how we get it right. I’m also deep in my preparations for a talk at #SMACCUS on ‘Guess, Gestalt or Genius’ and so I’m always on the look out for studies in this area (as there are surprising few). In my talk in Coventry I used the question of when to activate the Major Haemorrhage Protocol (1:1:1 resuscitation as per PROPPR) in trauma patients. Clearly not all patients need it and there are potential harms if we use it on the wrong patients.  
feedproxy.google.com
about 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
13

Towards a better epidemic

The consensus seems to be that no one had a particularly good Ebola epidemic, with the exception of the charity Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). This begs the question of who makes these judgment calls, and what was the last “good” epidemic you can remember?  
feeds.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
Preview
0
13

JC: Are typical chest pain symptoms predictive of outcome? St.Emlyn's - St.Emlyn's

Journal club critical appraisal of clinical judgement and gestalt in the diagnosis of patients with chest pain in the ED. St.Emlyn's  
feedproxy.google.com
about 6 years ago
Preview
0
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JC: Are typical chest pain symptoms predictive of outcome? St.Emlyn's - St.Emlyn's

Journal club critical appraisal of clinical judgement and gestalt in the diagnosis of patients with chest pain in the ED. St.Emlyn's  
stemlynsblog.org
about 6 years ago