New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
0
12

Novel oral anticoagulants for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis | Cochrane

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition in which a blood clot forms in the deep vein of the leg or pelvis. It affects approximately 1 in 1000 people. If it is not treated, the clot can travel in the blood and block the arteries in the lungs. This life-threatening condition is called a pulmonary embolism (PE) and occurs in approximately 3 to 4 per 10,000 people. The chances of getting a DVT can be increased if people have certain risk factors. These include previous clots, prolonged periods of immobility (such as travelling on aeroplanes or bed rest), cancer, exposure to oestrogens (pregnancy, oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy), trauma and blood disorders such as thrombophilia (abnormal blood clotting). A DVT is diagnosed through determining the risk factors and performing an ultrasound of the leg veins. If a DVT is confirmed, people are treated with an anticoagulant. This medicine prevents further clots from forming. Until recently, the drugs of choice were heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists. However, these drugs can cause side effects and have limitations. Two further classes of novel oral anticoagulants have been developed: these are called direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) and factor Xa inhibitors. There are particular reasons why oral DTIs and factor Xa inhibitors might now be better medicines to use. They can be given orally, they have a predictable effect, they do not require frequent monitoring or re-dosing and they have few known drug interactions. This review measures the effectiveness and safety of these new drugs with conventional treatment.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
31

CHIVA method for the treatment of varicose veins | Cochrane

Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a disorder in which veins fail to pump blood back to the heart adequately. It can cause varicose veins, skin ulcers, and superficial or deep vein thrombosis in the legs. The ambulatory conservative hemodynamic correction of venous insufficiency (CHIVA) method is a minimally invasive surgical technique to treat varicose veins. The aim of the CHIVA treatment is to eliminate the venous-venous shunts by disconnecting the escape points, preserving the saphenous vein and normal venous drainage of the superficial tissues of the limb.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
26

Dressings and topical agents for arterial leg ulcers | Cochrane

People with blood circulation problems in their legs can develop leg ulcers. The majority of ulcers result from poor blood flow in the veins and are treated by compression. Arterial leg ulcers occur because of poor blood supply to the legs when there is a block in a leg artery or narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis). Without treatment of the underlying poor arterial blood supply, ulcers take a long time to heal or may never heal. These ulcers are treated by covering them with dressings, or using creams or ointments (topical agents), or both to promote healing and protect the ulcers from infection. A variety of types of dressings can be used depending on the overall aim of the treatment. The intention is to select dressings to reduce ulcer pain, manage exudate if present (the fluid that can leak from these ulcers) and promote healing.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

Electromagnetic therapy (EMT) for treating venous leg ulcers | Cochrane

Venous leg ulcers (which appear as open sores) can be caused by a blockage or breakdown in the veins of the legs. Compression of the leg, using bandages or hosiery (stockings), can help heal most of these ulcers. Electromagnetic therapy is also sometimes offered. Electromagnetic therapy is not a form of radiation or heat, but uses an electromagnetic field to try to promote healing. This review of clinical trials concluded that there is no high quality evidence about whether electromagnetic therapy speeds the healing of venous leg ulcers and its effect is unclear.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Prolonged prehospital tourniquet placement associated with severe complications: a case report

Here is the full report Prolonged prehospital tourniquet placement associated with severe complications: a case report Editor's note: Yes... norepinephrine and crystalloid resuscitation for haemorrhagic shock..not ideal but remote medicine is like this at times! Its easy to blame prolonged tourniquet application for loss of leg but a severed femoral artery is also likely culprit…  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
9

Negative pressure wound therapy for treating leg ulcers | Cochrane

Leg ulcers are wounds that occur between the ankle and the knee as a result of poor blood flow in the legs. These wounds are relatively common often affecting older people. There are several different treatments for these ulcers and the underlying problems that cause them. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a treatment currently beng used for wounds including leg ulcers. NPWT involves the application to the wound of a dressing to which a machine is attached. The machine then applies a carefully controlled negative pressure (or vacuum), and sucks any wound and tissue fluid away from the treated area into a canister.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
8

Focal neurological deficits after trauma

A 38 year old woman developed headache (without neck pain) and weakness of her left upper and lower limbs after a concussive head trauma with scalp lacerations in a motor vehicle crash. On examination (more than 4.5 hours after the trauma), she was conscious, alert, and in cardiac sinus rhythm. There was no carotid bruit. She scored 7 points on the National Institute of Health stroke scale (maximum possible score 42). Positive neurological findings included mild blunting of the left nasolabial fold; left hemiparesis, with extensor muscles being weaker (3/5) than flexors in the left upper limb (4+/5), flexors being weaker (4 to 4+/5) than extensors in the left lower limb (4+ to 5/5), and distal more than proximal weakness in the left arm and leg. She also had brisk deep tendon reflexes in the limbs on the left side; a left extensor plantar response; left hemianopia; and left hemisensory (including the face) hypoaesthesia for pain, cold, and touch. Eyelid ptosis or paresis of extraocular movements were not present, and pupillary size and light reaction were normal.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
22

Chronic and slowly progressive weakness of the legs and hands

A 59 year old man was referred for a definitive diagnosis of chronic and progressive bilateral weakness of his feet and legs, which began aged 11 years. This was associated with gradual clawing of his feet, bilateral hand weakness, bilateral mild numbness of his hands and feet, and foot pain. No bladder or bowel disturbance was reported.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
20

Novel drugs and drug combinations for treating tuberculosis

A 56 year old man presented with pain and numbness in his lower legs. He had been treated for pulmonary tuberculosis for the previous six weeks. He thought that his symptoms had started a fortnight previously, after the tuberculosis clinic changed his treatment from a fixed dose combination preparation to multiple, separate drugs. He thought that the new tablets may be causing his symptoms. His partner was also being treated for tuberculosis but with even fewer tablets taken once weekly, and he wondered whether he could take the same treatment as she had. He had a history of excess alcohol intake and admitted to binge drinking at the weekends.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Non-Invasive Neurostimulators Help Paralyzed Men Learn How to Walk Again (VIDEO) |

The clinical potential for electrically triggering legs to move in paralyzed patients was thought to require implantable stimulators, but results from an e  
medgadget.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
17

Rash on the arms and legs

An 11 year old girl presented to her general practitioner with painful skin lesions on her arms (fig A⇓) and legs (fig B). She had a three week history of an upper respiratory illness and had been started on amoxicillin for presumed lower respiratory tract infection. Three days after starting treatment, she re-attended with a rash on her arms and legs; her parents were worried that it was caused by a drug allergy. Apart …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
12
0
29

Over time, #varicose and #spider veins... - NE Laser Vein Institute | Facebook

Over time, #varicose and #spider veins make legs feel heavy and tired, making walking a burden. Visit our website to learn more about how we can help....  
facebook.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

BoomCast, a Smart and Loud 3D Printed Leg Cast |

Anyone who has ever broken an arm or a leg knows full well how bulky and unwieldy conventional casts are. A group of engineers wanted to improve the experi  
medgadget.com
over 4 years ago
Mplus fb
4
25

Noninvasive Stimulation Gets Legs Moving After Spinal Cord Injury: MedlinePlus

Noninvasive Stimulation Gets Legs Moving After Spinal Cord Injury - device compares favourably to surgically implanted option, researchers say.  
nlm.nih.gov
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Interventions for leg cramps during pregnancy | Cochrane

Leg cramps are experienced as sudden, intense involuntary contractions of the leg muscles. They are a common problem in pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. They are painful and can interfere with daily activities, disrupt sleep, and reduce quality of life. Various interventions have been used during pregnancy to treat leg cramps, including drug, electrolyte (magnesium, calcium, sodium) and vitamin therapies, and non-drug therapies such as muscle stretching. The goal of this review was to find out what is effective and safe for treating leg cramps during pregnancy.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
2
40

Shock: Lesson 2 - Distinguishing Shock Types (Hypovolemic/Distributive/Cardiogenic/Obstructive)

How to use physical exam (e.g. JVP, ultrasound, passive leg raise, and extremity temp) to identify the subtype of shock. Disadvantages of PA catheters are al...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
8

Combined strategies to avoid foot ulcers in patients with diabetes | Cochrane

Foot ulcers (open sores) are common in people with diabetes mellitus (type 1 and type 2), especially those with problems in the nerves (peripheral neuropathy), the blood supply to their legs (peripheral vascular disease) or both. People with ulcers due to diabetes will sometimes need an amputation (surgical removal of part of the limb). Foot ulcers not only lead to physical disability and loss of quality of life, but also to economic burden (healthcare costs, industrial disability). The aim is therefore to prevent foot ulcers occurring, for example, by showing patients with diabetes how to look after their feet or by prompting doctors to check their patients' feet more often. The results of single prevention strategies alone have so far been disappointing, therefore in clinical practice, preventive interventions directed at patients, healthcare providers and/or the structure of health care are often combined. In this review of trials of complex, preventive interventions, we found insufficient evidence that these combined approaches can be effective in reducing foot problems.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
15

'Why am I less worthy than army amputee?' - BBC News

Suzanne Thomas, who had to have her leg amputated after contracting an infection, tells the BBC's Nikki Fox about her disappointment with her prosthetic leg.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
 85178980 85178147
0
1

Army veteran 'failed' over prosthetic leg by NHS - BBC News

The BBC's Nikki Fox has been speaking to former soldier Craig Gadd, who lost his leg in Afghanistan after he stepped on a bomb back in 2010, about his struggles with his NHS prosthetic leg.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Ultrasound guidance for upper and lower limb blocks | Cochrane

Nerve blocks are used to numb all or part of the arms or legs (peripheral blockade) for surgery, or to provide pain relief after the operation, or both. Using ultrasound, anaesthetists can 'see' vital structures below the skin, which should allow them to place the local anaesthetic injection accurately and avoid damaging other tissues or organs. We aimed to assess whether ultrasound has any advantages over other nerve-locating techniques for nerve blocks of the arms or legs in adults.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago