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Everything you need to know about the Liver

The liver is one of the most confusing organs to get to grips with, and one that medical students know very little about prior to startinf medical school. This document aims to explain everything a first year medical student needs to know about the liver in a clear and concise manner, with the aid of bulletpoints and diagrams.  
Lucy Faulkner
over 8 years ago
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19
812

Anatomy of the Liver

Plastinated detached human liver presented and edited by Dr. Akram Abood Jaffar.  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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18
538

Overview of the Liver

The Liver Anatomy  Right (middle hepatic vein) Left lobe  Right – caudate & quadrate lobes  Overall, 8 subdivisions separated by R, middle & L hepatic veins…  
Sarah Wagstaffe
over 10 years ago
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15
246

Cirrhosis Overview

 
Sarah Wagstaffe
over 10 years ago
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15
434

Bilirubin Pathway

This tutorial explains the Bilirubin Pathway from the destruction of Red Blood Cells to the excretion of Bilirubin in the Bile, Faeces and Urine.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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11
304

Liver Anatomy and Blood Supply

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Image: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8Ss3-wJfHrpNnczTF9xMTVZSVE/edit?usp=sharing  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 7 years ago
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9
429

Liver Physiology

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Image: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8Ss3-wJfHrpYm9ITDBxRnRQQUU/edit?usp=sharing  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 7 years ago
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8
361

Live Dissection of the Liver

After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to describe and identify gross anatomy of the liver.  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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7
266

Biochemistry Help: The Cori Cycle

The Cori Cycle is responsible for removing excess Lactic acid or Lactate from the muscle. It is then uptaken by the Liver where it is converted back into Pyruvate, then into Glucose again. This video explains how!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1n1xn42?1444773927
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127

Successful liver transplantation using Facebook

In January 2012 I wrote about a girl who had created a Facebook page because she urgently needed a liver. In August 2004 I had a car accident in Germany, where damaged my limbs and some of my internal organs. That's why I need a liver URGENTLY! Over 26.000 people (family members, doctors, nurses, her friends and students from all parts of the country) followed and liked her page in 3 months. Finally she'd found a suitable liver, and she is fine now. I believe that our generation of health care professionals should be prepared for this and should provide meaningful help, because in the future we can not avoid patients who are interested in social media. E-patients will increasingly use web 2.0 tools as part of their health management and we must respond to that.  
Zoltán Cserháti
almost 8 years ago
30080
4
204

Liver pathology 1

Video tutorial outlining the basic anatomy and physiology of the liver followed by a summary of acute and chronic liver disease, hepatic failure and cirrhosis.  
Podmedics
about 9 years ago
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4
83

Shotgun Histology Liver

Shotgun Histology Liver  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 7 years ago
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4
153

LIVER TRAUMA

A short presentation on types of liver trauma and its management.  
Souradeep Dutta
almost 6 years ago
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4
172

Liver Trauma

Liver Trauma Souradeep Dutta INDIA  
Souradeep Dutta
almost 6 years ago
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4
60

3D MRI Visualization Technique Spots Whether Tumor Cells Are Dying from Chemo |

Modern chemo treatment for liver tumors requires monitoring how the therapy is affecting the tumors. This is typically done by measuring the size of the tu  
medgadget.com
over 6 years ago
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4
169

LFTs - Liver Function Tests

Almost every patient admitted to hospital will have their liver function tested, along with a full blood count, urea and electrolytes, glucose, and probably CRP. A typical set of LFTS will include: Bilirubin - can show pre-hepatic, intra-hepatic and post-hepatic causes of jaundice. A patient won't necessarily be visibly jaundiced if bilirubin is raised, especially if the bilirubin is not grossly elevated.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
about 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 2njk5o?1444774020
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1336

LWW: Case Of The Month - April 2013

This month’s case is by David R Bell PhD, co-author of Medical Physiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 3e (ISBN: 9781451110395) For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Rhoades4e, with 15% off using the discount code: MEDUCATION. The case below is followed by a quiz question, allowing you a choice of diagnoses. Select the one letter section that best describes the patient’s condition. The Case A 28-year old woman has an unremarkable pregnancy through her first 28 weeks of gestation, with normal weight gain and no serious complications. She has no previous history of diabetes, hypertension of other systemic disease before or during her current pregnancy. During her 30-week checkup, her blood pressure measures 128/85, and she complains about feeling slightly more “bloated” than usual with swelling in her legs that seems to get more uncomfortable as the day goes on. Her obsterician recommends that she get more bed rest, stay off her feet as much as possible and return for evaluation in one week. At the one-week follow-up, the patient presents with noticable”puffiness” in her face, and a blood pressure of 145/95. She complains she has been developing headaches, sporadic blurred vision, right-sided discomfort and some shortness of breath. She has gained more than 10 lb (4.5kg) in the past week. A urinalysis on the patient revelas no glucose but a 3+ reading for protein. Her obstetrician decides to admit her immediately to a local tertiary care hospital for further evaluation. Over the next 24 hours, the patient’s urine output is recorded as 500mL and contains 6.8 grams of protein. Her plasma albumin level is 3.1 g/dl, hemacrit 48%, indirect bilirubin 1.5mg/dl and blood platelets=77000/uL, respectively. Her blood pressure is now 190/100. It is decided to try to deliver the foetus. The expelled placenta is small and shows signs of widespread ischmic damage. Within a week of delivery, the mother’s blood pressure returns to normal, and her oedema subsides. One month later, the mother shows no ill effects of thos later-term syndrome. Question What is the clinical diagnosis of this patient’s condition and its underlying pathophysiology? A. Gestational Hypertension B. Preeclampsia C. Gestational Diabetes D. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava Answer The correct answer is "B. Preeclampsia". The patient’s symptoms and laboratory findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Preeclampsia, which is a condition occurring in some pregnancies that causes life-threatening organ and whole body regulatory malfunctions. The patient’s negative urine glucose is inconsistent with gestational diabetes. Gestational hypertension or vena caval compression cannot explain all of the patient findings. The patient has three major abnormal findings- generalised oedema, hypertension and proteinuria which are all common in preeclampsia. Although sequalae of a normal pregnancy can include water and salt retention, bloating, modest hypertension and leg swelling (secondary to capillary fluid loss from increased lower limb capillary hydrostatic pressure due to compression of the inferior vena cava by the growing foetus/uterus), oedema in the head and upper extremities, a rapid 10 pound weight gain and shortness of breath suggests a generalized and serious oedematous state. The patient did not have hypertension before or within 20 weeks gestation (primary hypertension) and did not develop hypertension after the 20th week of pregnancy with no other abnormal findings (gestational hypertension). Hypertension with proteinuria occurring beyond the 20th week of pregnancy however is a hallmark of preeclampsia. In addition, the patient has hemolysis (elevated bilirubin and LDH levels), elevated liver enzyme levels and thrombocytopenia. This is called the HELLP syndrome (HELLP = Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets.), and is considered evidence of serious patient deterioration in preeclampsia. A urine output of 500 ml in 24 hours is 1/2 to 1/4 of normal output in a hydrated female and indicates renal insufficiency. Protein should never be found in the urine and indicates loss of capillaries integrity in glomeruli which normally are not permeable to proteins. The patient has substantial 24 urine protein loss and hypoalbuminemia. However, generally plasma albumin levels must drop below 2.5 gm/dl to decrease plasma oncotic pressure enough to cause general oedema. The patient’s total urinary protein loss was insufficient in this regard. Capillary hyperpermeability occurs with preeclampsia and, along with hypertension, could facilitate capillary water efflux and generalized oedema. However myogenic constriction of pre-capillary arterioles could reduce the effect of high blood pressure on capillary water efflux. An early increase in hematocrit in this patient suggests hemoconcentration which could be caused by capillary fluid loss but the patient’s value of 48 is unremarkable and of little diagnostic value because increased hematocrit occurs in both preeclampsia and normal pregnancy. PGI2, PGE2 and NO, produced during normal pregnancy, cause vasorelaxation and luminal expansion of uterine arteries, which supports placental blood flow and development. Current theory suggests that over production of endothelin, thromboxane and oxygen radicals in preeclampsia antagonize vasorelaxation while stimulating platelet aggregation, microthrombi formation and endothelial destruction. These could cause oedema, hypertension, renal/hepatic deterioration and placental ischemia with release of vasotoxic factors. The patient’s right-sided pain is consistent with liver pathology (secondary to hepatic DIC or oedematous distention). Severe hypertension in preeclampsia can lead to maternal end organ damage, stroke, and death. Oedematous distension of the liver can cause hepatic rupture and internal hemorrhagic shock. Having this patient carry the baby to term markedly risks the life of the mother and is not considered current acceptable clinical practice. Delivery of the foetus and termination of the pregnancy is the only certain way to end preeclampsia. Read more This case is by David R Bell PhD, co-author of Medical Physiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 3e (ISBN: 9781451110395) For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Rhoades4e. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at (lww.co.uk)[http://lww.co.uk] when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out! About LWW/ Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams and Wilkins (LWW) is a leading publisher of high-quality content for students and practitioners in medical and related fields. Their text and review products, eBooks, mobile apps and online solutions support students, educators, and instiutions throughout the professional’s career. LWW are proud to partner with Meducation.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 7 years ago
0
4
126

Gastrulation Lecture

Following the implantation of the blastocyst into the endometrium of uterus, the embryo begins another important embryological process called gastrulation. Gastrulation is the formation of the three distinct germ layers - the ectoderm, the mesoderm and the endoderm. The ectoderm is the outermost layer of the developing embryo and it consists of cells that eventually give rise to the integumentary system (the outer skin, nails and hair) as well as the nervous system (central and peripheral system). The mesoderm is the middle layer of the developing embryo and it consists of cells that eventually give rise to the musculoskeletal system (bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, smooth muscle), cardiovascular system (the heart and blood vessels), excretory system (kidneys) and reproductive system (gonads). The endoderm is the innermost layer of the developing embryo and it gives rise to the epithelial layer of the digestive tract, lungs, pancreas, bladder, liver as well as the thyroid gland, parathyroid gland and thymus.  
aklectures.com
over 5 years ago
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Posterior view of liver cake

My friends and I have found making cakes in the shapes of body parts a useful revision tool.  
Alex Fane De Salis
over 8 years ago