New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview 300x226
3
91

Signet-ring Inclusions in Malaria

 
Dr Alastair Buick
over 10 years ago
Preview
10
91

Malaria - Plasmodium

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
87

Causes of Splenomegaly

"CHICAGO" C – Cancer H – Haematological malignancies – anaemia, leukaemia, lymphoma, I – Infection (CMV, HEP, HIV, TB, parasitic (malaria)). EBV is the most common community acquired Inflammation – sarcoid, amyloid C – Congestion; portal hypertension  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Malaria
2
77

Malaria

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
6
1
16

WHO | World Health Day 2014: Preventing vector-borne diseases

More than half the world’s population is at risk from diseases such as malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease, schistosomiasis, and yellow fever, carried by mosquitoes, flies, ticks, water snails and other vectors. Every year, more than 1 billion people are infected and more than 1 million die from vector-borne diseases. This World Health Day – 7 April – WHO is highlighting the serious and increasing threat of vector-borne diseases, with the slogan “Small bite, big threat”.  
www.who.int
over 5 years ago
7
1
7

WHO | World Malaria Day 2014: WHO helps countries assess feasibility of eliminating malaria

On World Malaria Day (25 April), WHO is launching a manual to help countries to assess the technical, operational and financial feasibility of moving towards malaria elimination.  
who.int
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
8

Immune children aid malaria vaccine hunt - BBC News

An antibody produced by children who are naturally resistant to malaria could lead to an effective vaccine for the disease, scientists report.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
1

Immune children aid malaria vaccine development - BBC News

An antibody produced by children who are naturally resistant to malaria could lead to an effective vaccine for the disease, scientists report.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
15

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Malaria: Red cell containing intraerythrocytic ring forms (trophozoites) Peripheral smear from a patient with malaria shows…”

“Malaria: Red cell containing intraerythrocytic ring forms (trophozoites) Peripheral smear from a patient with malaria shows intraerythrocytic ring forms…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
8

Commentary: False dichotomy hinders global health

Global health in recent years has been characterised by bitter debates, with each side marshalling a mixture of evidence and moral arguments to prove that their approach is the one that will save more lives. Witness, for example, the never ending disputes over whether the best way to reduce avertable deaths is through strengthening health delivery systems (a “horizontal” approach) or targeting individual diseases like HIV/AIDS or malaria (a “vertical” approach).1 Or take the rancorous debate over whether the private sector should be engaged or marginalised when it comes to tackling health challenges in low and middle income countries.2 Now Jocalyn Clark sets up yet another binary view of global health, arguing that a focus on biomedical approaches limits success; what we need, she says, is to follow social and political pathways to improve the health of the world’s poor.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
7

Advancing Global Health Conference 2014: Dr. Regina Rabinovich (2 of 11)

http://www.einstein.yu.edu - Regina Rabinovich, M.D., M.P.H., ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, department of immunology and infectious diseases at Ha...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
2
12

The impact of providing rapid diagnostic malaria tests on fever management in the private retail sector in Ghana: a cluster randomized trial

Objective To examine the impact of providing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria on fever management in private drug retail shops where most poor rural people with fever present, with the aim of reducing current massive overdiagnosis and overtreatment of malaria.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
31

Resuscitating drowned children

The World Health Organization published its global report on drowning in November 2014, reporting a staggering 372 000 deaths a year from all types of water immersion. Worldwide, drowning is in the top 10 causes of death in children and young people, particularly in males and those aged under 5. An estimated 21 children and young adults are drowned every hour.1 Other public health matters have had disproportionately greater attention, despite the numbers of deaths from drowning being equivalent to two thirds of global deaths from malnutrition and over one half of deaths from malaria.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
2
0
6

Is there any evidence that vitamin B12 is helpful for prevention of mosquito bites?

I've heard lots of times that vitamin B12 (or indeed garlic) is helpful for the prevention of malaria, but as I understand it, this isn't true. I'm trying to get a definitive answer. Is there any evidence that this does help reduce the chance of getting a mosquito bite?  
Martyn Freeman
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 gc6z71?1444774005
7
222

Worst Medical Experience Ever

Worst experience ever? - this is pretty difficult as I've worked in some of the poorest countries in the world and seen some things that should never happen like children dying of dehydration and malaria. But this recent experience was definitely the worst. It was midnight and I was trying to get my 16 month old to sleep having woken up after vomiting in his cot. Despite paracetamol, ibuprofen, stripping to nappy, damp sponging and having the window open he went rigid and started fitting. It only lasted a minute or two yet felt like an eternity as he was unable to breathe and became progressively blue as my mind raced ahead to brain damage or some other horrible sequalae. The fitting stopped and my mind turned to whether I was going to have to start CPR. I lay him on the floor and put my ear to his chest and was glad to hear a strong heartbeat but he was floppy with a compromised airway so I quickly got him in the recovery position. The ambulance arrived in 8 minutes and after some oxygen and some observations he was strapped in and ready to go. He had been unconscious for about 15 minutes but was starting to come round, much to my relief. The ambulance crew were great and their quick response made all the difference but then they took nearly half an hour to get to A&E in the middle of the night because they took the most awkward route imaginable. I don't know if it was a deliberate delaying tactic or just a lack of local knowledge but even without a blue light I could have done it in half the time! Why do ambulances not have GPS - ideally with local traffic info built in? We arrived in A&E and were ushered to a miserable receptionist who took our details and told us to have a seat. I noticed above her head that the wait time was 3.5 hours, though we did see a junior nurse who took his observations again. Not long after the screen changed to a 5 hour wait and a bit later to a 6 hour wait! I am glad to say that by about 3 hours my little man was back to his usual self (as evidenced by his attempts at destroying the department) and so after getting the nurse to repeat his obs (all normal) we decided to take him home, knowing we had a few more hours to wait for the doctor, and that the doctor was now unlikely to do anything as he was now well. I tell the story in such detail in part for catharsis, in part to share my brief insight into being on the other side of the consultation, but also because it illustrated a number of system failures. It was a horrible experience but made a lot worse by those system failures. And I couldn't help but feel even more sorry for those around me who didn't have the medical experience that I had to contextualise it all. Sickness, in ourselves or our loved ones, is bad enough without the system making it worse. I had 3 hours of walking around the department with my son in my arms which gave me plenty of time to observe what was going on around me and consider whether it could be improved. I did of course not have access to all areas and so couldn't see what was happening behind the scenes so things may have been busier than I was aware of. Also it was only one evening so not necessarily representative. There were about 15 children in the department and for the 3 hours we were there only a handful of new patients that arrived so no obvious reason for the increasing delay. As I walked around it was clear to me that at least half of the children didn't need to be there. Some were fast asleep on the benches, arguably suggesting they didn't need emergency treatment. One lad had a minor head injury that just needed a clean and some advice. Whilst I didn't ask anyone what was wrong with people talk and so you hear what some of the problems were. Some were definately far more appropriate for general practice. So how could things have been improved and could technology have helped as well? One thing that struck me is that the 'triage' nurse would have been much better as a senior doctor. Not necessarily a consultant but certainly someone with the experience to make decisions. Had this been the case I think a good number could have been sent home very quickly, maybe with some basic treatment or maybe just with advice. Even if it was more complex it may have been that an urgent outpatient in a few days time would have been a much more satisfactory way of dealing with the problem. Even in our case where immediate discharge wouldn't have been appropriate a senior doctor could have made a quick assessment and said "let's observe him for a couple of hours and then repeat is obs - if he is well, the obs are normal and you are happy then you can go home". This would have made the world of difference to us. So where does the technology come in? I've already mentioned Sat Nav for the ambulance but there are a number of other points where technology could have played a part in improving patient experience. Starting with the ambulance if they had access to real time data on hospital A&E waiting times they may have been able to divert us to a hospital with a much shorter time. This is even more important for adult hospitals were the turnover of patients is much higher. Such information could help staff and patients make more informed decisions. The ambulance took us to hospital which was probably appropriate for us but not for everyone. Unfortunately many of the other services like GP out of hours are not always prepared to accept such patients and again the ambulance crews need to know where is available and what access and waiting times they have. Walk-in patients are often also totally inappropriate and an easy method of redirection would be beneficial for all concerned. But this requires change and may even require such radical ideas as paying for transport to take patients to alternative locations if they are more appropraite. The reasons patient's choose A&E when other services would be far more appropriate are many and complex. It can be about transport and convenience and past experiences and many other things. It is likely that at least some of it is that patients often struggle to get an appointment to see their own GP within a reasonable time frame or just that their impression is that it will be difficult to get an appointment so they don't even try. But imagine a system where the waiting times for appointments for all GPs and out of hours services were readily available to hospitals, ambulances, NHS direct etc. Even better imagine that authorised people could book appointments directly, even when the practice was closed. How many patients would be happy to avoid a long wait in A&E if they had the reassurance of a GP appointment the next day? And the technology already exists to do some of this and it wouldn't be that hard to adapt current technology to provide this functionality. Yet it still doesn't happen. I have my theories as to why but this is enough for one post. In case you were wondering my son appears to have made a full recovery with no obvious ongoing problems. I think I have recovered and then he makes the same breathing noises he made just before the fit and I am transported back to that fateful night. I think it will take time for the feelings to fade.  
Dr Damian Williams
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1agiiai?1444774290
1
119

A curious epidemic of superficial accesses in Africa

This anecdote happened many years ago when I was a brand new (read: inexperienced) physician doing my stint in the Colonial Health Service of the former Belgian Congo. I was assigned to a small hospital in the interior of the Maniema province. Soft tissue infections and abscesses were rather common in this tropical climate, but at one time there seemed to be virtual epidemic of abscesses on the buttocks or upper arms. It seemed that patients with these abscesses were all coming from one area of the territory. That seemed rather odd and we started investigating. By way of background let me say that the hospital was also serving several outlying clinics or dispensaries in the territory. Health aides were assigned to a specific dispensary on a periodic basis. Patients would know his schedule and come to the dispensary for their treatments. Now this was the era of “penicillin.” The natives were convinced that this wonder drug would cure all their ailments, from malaria and dysentery, to headaches, infertility, and impotence. You name it and penicillin was thought to be the cure-all. No wonder they would like to get an injection of penicillin for whatever their ailment was. As our investigation demonstrated, the particular health aide assigned to the dispensary from where most of the abscesses came, would swipe a vial of penicillin and a bottle of saline from the hospital’s pharmacy on his way out to his assigned dispensary. When he arrived at his dispensary there was usually already a long line of patients waiting with various ailments. He would get out his vial of the “magic” penicillin, show the label to the crowd and pour it in the liter bottle of saline; shake it up and then proceed to give anyone, who paid five Belgian Francs (at that time equivalent to .10 US $), which he pocketed, an injection of the penicillin, now much diluted in the large bottle of physiologic solution. To make matters worse, he used only one syringe and one needle. No wonder there were so many abscesses in the area of injection. Of course we quickly put a stop to that. Anyone interested in reading more about my experience in Africa and many other areas can download a free e book via Smashwords at: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522 . The title of the book is "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path"  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
0
14

Fake medicines are undermining global efforts to combat infectious disease, says US journal

Counterfeit and poor quality medicines threaten to undermine decades of progress in global health, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, say papers published on 20 April in a special supplement of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
18

Fake medicines are undermining global efforts to combat infectious disease, says US journal

Counterfeit and poor quality medicines threaten to undermine decades of progress in global health, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, say papers published on 20 April in a special supplement of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
3

Plasmodium vivax malaria in the UK

Plasmodium falciparum malaria is so lethal and ubiquitous that one could easily forget that other species of malaria are globally important too. In particular, Plasmodium vivax, the main cause of relapsing malaria, affects up to 300 million people annually, and occurs in far wider and ecologically diverse settings than P falciparum.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
4

Clinical, geographical, and temporal risk factors associated with presentation and outcome of vivax malaria imported into the United Kingdom over 27 years: observational study

Objective To examine temporal and geographical trends, risk factors, and seasonality of imported vivax malaria in the United Kingdom to inform clinical advice and policy.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago