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Antibiotics Mindmap

A concise mindmap detailing everything you really need to know about antibiotic action!  
Julia Marr
almost 6 years ago
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Bacteria Mind Map

 
Julia Marr
almost 6 years ago
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Antibiotics summary

Classifications of antibiotics - a useful summary. The Table is no way complete. Kindly Ignore Spelling mistakes Checkout mynotes4usmle.tumblr.com for more  
Sarosh Kamal
over 4 years ago
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Respiratory Notes

Document covering some key aspects of respiratory  
James Davis
over 7 years ago
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Cardiac arrhythmias

Includes description, symptoms and an ECG rhythm strip typical of that arrhythmia.  
Laura R Barry
over 5 years ago
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Immunology principles mindmap

A mindmap of some key principles of immunology I made for revision purposes. Nothing too complicated (hopefully)!  
Rafi Ahmed
over 4 years ago
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Cardiovascular Examination OSCE guide

This is a guide to performing a cardiovascular examination in the context of an OSCE exam. It was created by a group of medical students for the free revision website www.geekymedics.com where you can find a written guide to accompany the video. The way in which this examination is carried out varies greatly between individuals & institutions therefore this should be used as a rough framework which you can personalise to suit your own style.  
Lewis Potter
over 8 years ago
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A medical student guide to Red Eye

This booklet was developed as a part of Special Study Unit (Doctors as Teachers) at Peninsula Medical School. This booklet covers some of the important aspects of Ophthalmology. This booklet could be used as a quick revision guide before finals and also could be used along Ophthalmology placements. The purpose of this booklet is to provide some insight into the most common presentations of red eye and their management.  
Nirosa Vicneswararajah
over 7 years ago
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1981

OSCE Gastrointestinal examination

Thorough flowchart for carrying out a full examination of the gastrointestinal system - should come in very handy for OSCEs!  
Julia Marr
over 5 years ago
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Liver Diseases Revision

A simplified drawing for the diseases of liver and gallbladder. Hope it helps!  
nedaa kiwan
over 4 years ago
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Rheumatology Course

Document covering the GALS screen and the key rheumatology topics.  
James Davis
over 7 years ago
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History Taking for OSCEs

Aimed at those in clinical years. The presentation goes through how to maximize the use of the Calgary-Cambridge Framework, do a comprehensive systems review, and come up with differentials using two surgical sieves.  
Clarissa Gurbani
over 7 years ago
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Everything you need to know about the Liver

The liver is one of the most confusing organs to get to grips with, and one that medical students know very little about prior to startinf medical school. This document aims to explain everything a first year medical student needs to know about the liver in a clear and concise manner, with the aid of bulletpoints and diagrams.  
Lucy Faulkner
over 7 years ago
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Thyroid Cancer & Differential Diagnosis of Lumps in Neck for Medical Students and Foundation Doctors

A complete guide to the diagnosis and managment of thyroid cancer and how to clinically differentiate lumps in the neck. This resource is aimed at medical students in clinical years and foundation doctors.  
Adam Beebeejaun
over 8 years ago
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Confidence Building During Medical Training

My fellow medical students, interns, residents and attendings: I am not a medical student but an emeritus professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and also a voluntary faculty member at the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. I have a great deal of contact with medical students and residents. During training (as student or resident), gaining confidence in one's own abilities is a very important part of becoming a practitioner. This aspect of training does not always receive the necessary attention and emphasis. Below I describe one of the events of confidence building that has had an important and lasting influence on my career as an academic physician. I graduated from medical school in Belgium many years ago. I came to the US to do my internship in a small hospital in up state NY. I was as green as any intern could be, as medical school in Belgium at that time had very little hands on practice, as opposed to the US medical graduates. I had a lot of "book knowledge" but very little practical confidence in myself. The US graduates were way ahead of me. My fellow interns, residents and attendings were really understanding and did their best to build my confidence and never made me feel inferior. One such confidence-building episodes I remember vividly. Sometime in the middle part of the one-year internship, I was on call in the emergency room and was called to see a woman who was obviously in active labor. She was in her thirties and had already delivered several babies before. The problem was that she had had no prenatal care at all and there was no record of her in the hospital. I began by asking her some standard questions, like when her last menstrual period had been and when she thought her due date was. I did not get far with my questioning as she had one contraction after another and she was not interested in answering. Soon the bag of waters broke and she said that she had to push. The only obvious action for me at that point was to get ready for a delivery in the emergency room. There was no time to transport the woman to the labor and delivery room. There was an emergency delivery “pack” in the ER, which the nurses opened for me while I quickly washed my hands and put on gloves. Soon after, a healthy, screaming, but rather small baby was delivered and handed to the pediatric resident who had been called. At that point it became obvious that there was one more baby inside the uterus. Realizing that I was dealing with a twin pregnancy, I panicked, as in my limited experience during my obstetrical rotation some months earlier I had never performed or even seen a twin delivery. I asked the nurses to summon the chief resident, who promptly arrived to my great relief. I immediately started peeling off my gloves to make room for the resident to take my place and deliver this twin baby. However, after verifying that this baby was also a "vertex" without any obvious problem, he calmly stood by, and over my objections, bluntly told me “you can do it”, even though I kept telling him that this was a first for me. I delivered this healthy, screaming twin baby in front of a large number of nurses and doctors crowding the room, only to realize that this was not the end of it and that indeed there was a third baby. Now I was really ready to step aside and let the chief resident take over. However he remained calm and again, stood by and assured me that I could handle this situation. I am not even sure how many triplets he had delivered himself as they are not too common. Baby number three appeared quickly and also was healthy and vigorous. What a boost to my self-confidence that was! I only delivered one other set of triplets later in my career and that was by C-Section. All three babies came head first. If one of them had been a breech the situation might have been quite different. What I will never forget is the implied lesson in confidence building the chief resident gave me. I have always remembered that. In fact I have put this approach in practice numerous times when the roles were reversed later in my career as teacher. Often in a somewhat difficult situation at the bedside or in the operating room, a student or more junior doctor would refer to me to take over and finish a procedure he or she did not feel qualified to do. Many times I would reassure and encourage that person to continue while I talked him or her through it. Many of these junior doctors have told me afterwards how they appreciated this confidence building. Of course one has to be careful to balance this approach with patient safety and I have never delegated responsibility in critical situations and have often taken over when a junior doctor was having trouble. Those interested, can read more about my experiences in the US and a number of other countries, in a free e book, entitled "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path" can be downloaded at this link. Enjoy!  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
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Diseases of Blood Vessels

My hand-drawn diagrams of the diseases of the blood vessels.  
nedaa kiwan
over 4 years ago
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Mnemonics For Finals

Mnemonics are a great tool for the medical student. They allow complex information to be condensed into a few words and essentially make your memory more efficient. This material is provided by revise4finals (www.revise4finals.co.uk), courtesy of PasTest Online Revision for Medical Students (www.pastest.co.uk). You can find more mnemonics and other revision materials at both of these websites.  
revise4finals.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Type 2 diabetes basics

I am writing a series of endocrinology short (10 slide) presentations on key things i think you need to know as medical students. I will do another presentation on complications in more depth comments pleas I will put some audio with it soon  
Nick Thomas
almost 9 years ago
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Medical Student Apps: Chest X-ray Interpretation (for beginners)

This video tutorial has been made for use with Medical Student Apps: Chest Xrays, an application for the iPhone and iPad. Download the app here for free: htt...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Cardiovasular 2
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OSCE Skills, clinical examination resources for medical students

Providing medical students with an abundance of free and exclusive e-learning stations for studying for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)  
OSCE Skills
over 5 years ago