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Methicillin-ResistantStaphylococcusAureus

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Diagnosis and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults - American Family Physician

Community-acquired pneumonia is diagnosed by clinical features (e.g., cough, fever, pleuritic chest pain) and by lung imaging, usually an infiltrate seen on chest radiography. Initial evaluation should determine the need for hospitalization versus outpatient management using validated mortality or severity prediction scores. Selected diagnostic laboratory testing, such as sputum and blood cultures, is indicated for inpatients with severe illness but is rarely useful for outpatients. Initial outpatient therapy should include a macrolide or doxycycline. For outpatients with comorbidities or who have used antibiotics within the previous three months, a respiratory fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, or moxifloxacin), or an oral beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide should be used. Inpatients not admitted to an intensive care unit should receive a respiratory fluoroquinolone, or a beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide. Patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia or who are admitted to the intensive care unit should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic, plus azithromycin or a respiratory fluoroquinolone. Those with risk factors for Pseudomonas should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic (piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem, doripenem, or cefepime), plus an aminoglycoside and azithromycin or an antipseudomonal fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin). Those with risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be given vancomycin or linezolid. Hospitalized patients may be switched from intravenous to oral antibiotics after they have clinical improvement and are able to tolerate oral medications, typically in the first three days. Adherence to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Physicians should promote pneumococcal and influenza vaccination as a means to prevent community-acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal bacteremia.  
aafp.org
over 3 years ago
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Zorro Swab Detects 20% More MRSA in Nursing Homes

The use of nasal swabs alone can lead to the underdetection of multidrug-resistant organisms, a study of nursing-home residents shows, but comprehensive swabbing can improve detection rates.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Acinetobacter baumannii -- The New MRSA?

Infections caused by this bacteria are commonly multi-drug resistant and can be difficult to treat. Find out what there is to know.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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New Therapeutic Options for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

Read about the new approved drugs for the treatment of MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Impact of Universal ICU Staphylococcus Aureus Decolonization

Is ICU decolonization coordinated across hospitals in a region enough to eradicate MRSA completely in that region? This new study investigates.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Bacterial Wall Teichoic Acid Inhibitors and MRSA Susceptibility

Inhibitors of bacterial wall teichoic acid biosynthesis can restore the susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to beta-lactam antibiotics, researchers have reported.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Ancient recipe that could be a modern cure - BBC News

A 1000 year old Anglo Saxon medical book has been found to contain a recipe which could help fight against MRSA  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago
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Show Contact Precautions the Door?

Healthcare workers hate them, and the evidence that they work is paltry. Could we really do away with contact precautions for MRSA and VRE? Oh, happy day…  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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USA300 MRSA, United States, 2000-2013

This study examines the geographic distribution of USA300, a strain type of MRSA that caused MRSA infections in the United States for approximately a decade.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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MSSA Mortality Similar to MRSA in Infants

Hospital infection control practices should broaden to include all S aureus infections, not just those that are methicillin resistant.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Is it possible to decrease MRSA carriage by putting antibiotics in your nose?

It is estimated that up to 15-30% of the human population in developed countries are colonized by the community acquired strains of methicillin resistant staph aureus. The risk of developing a skin infection in the year following discovery of colonized status is approximately 1-in-4. Autoinfection rates are between 76-86% – thus most people that get MRSA infections get it from themselves.  
pemcincinnati.com
almost 4 years ago
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Critical Care

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains an important pathogen in pneumonia. Bacteremia may secondarily complicate MRSA pneumonia. The epidemiology and outcomes associated with bacteremia in the setting of MRSA pneumonia are unknown. We sought to describe the prevalence of bacteremia in MRSA pneumonia and its impact on hospital mortality and length of stay (LOS).  
ccforum.com
about 4 years ago
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A common hospital soap may reduce MRSA spread

Researchers suggest patient care and reduction of MRSA and other hospital-acquired infections may both benefit from using the common hospital soap chlorhexidine to bathe patients.  
medicalnewstoday.com
about 4 years ago
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MRSA In Practice

Aimed at junior hospital doctors and general practitioners, the In Practice Series has been devised by RSM Press to present cutting-edge and clear-cut opinion leader advice and summary acts related to every day clinical practice.MRSA is an all too familiar acronym in use in most UK hospitals. MRSA was discovered in the 1960s however has not been a public cause for concern until the current pandemic started in the 1990s. It shows no signs of abating and the UK now has about the highest prevalence in Europe. It has captured the attention of the public and politicians but how important is it in clinical practice? How did it evolve, will it go away or get worse - will it really develop into the untreatable superbug? Is it more virulent than Staphylococcus aureus, what are its common clinical presentation and the best treatments? What are the best ways to control it if indeed we should bother? How much does it cost the NHS? Do we have any new strategies up our sleeves? These are just some of the intriguing questions that a distinguished panel of authors from around the world have tried to answer in this monograph.Some of the topics covered include:Historical perspectives - Ian Phillips (London)Immunology and pathogenesis of MRSA - Von Belkum (Rotterdam) Antibiotic resistance in MRSA - Giles Edwards (Glasgow)Evolution of MRSA - Mark Enright (London University)Epidemiology of MRSA - Vuopia-Varkila (Finland) Control of MRSA - Barry Cookson (London) Georgia Duckworth (London) & Hans Kolmos (Denmark) Treatment of MRSA - Ian Gould (Aberdeen)Decolonisation of MRSA patient - A Seaton (Glasgow)Laboratory aspects- developments in detection and AST - Donald Morrison (Glasgow) Alternative treatments - Tom Riley (Perth, Australia)MRSA in the home and on the farm - Vos + Vos (Nijmegen/Rotterdam)Mopping up MRSA - Stephanie Dancer (Glasgow)Guidance to control MRSA from the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh - D Baird (Glasgow)With its easily accessible approach, broken down into easy-to read chapters, the tips and useful advice of this text makes this a key text for all hospital practitioners. MRSA In Practice is a book that no health care professional can afford to be without.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole versus vancomycin for severe infections caused by meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: randomised controlled trial

Objective To show non-inferiority of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole compared with vancomycin for the treatment of severe infections due to meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole versus vancomycin for severe infections caused by meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: randomised controlled trial

Objective To show non-inferiority of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole compared with vancomycin for the treatment of severe infections due to meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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the short coat: Breadth and Length - Antibiotics in Uncomplicated Cellulitis

Interesting and very useful post, Lauren. In Australia we generally use flucloxacillin or dicloxacillin as first line in cellulitis, as per our Antibiotic Guidelines, although it is recommended for 7-10 days. Do you use it in North America? It's got good strep and non-MRSA staph coverage and narrower spectrum than cephalexin, although the kids don't like the taste as much. We would typically use cephalexin as an alternative, and clindamycin if penicillin allergic or for MRSA. After reading your post I'll be encouraged to use shorter duration. Admittedly, I quite often use a 5 day course anyway due to the pack size of flucloxacillin, but at least now I've got some useful references to back me up!  
shortcoatsinem.blogspot.com
over 4 years ago