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Methicillin-ResistantStaphylococcusAureus

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USA300 MRSA, United States, 2000-2013

This study examines the geographic distribution of USA300, a strain type of MRSA that caused MRSA infections in the United States for approximately a decade.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Show Contact Precautions the Door?

Healthcare workers hate them, and the evidence that they work is paltry. Could we really do away with contact precautions for MRSA and VRE? Oh, happy day…  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Ancient recipe that could be a modern cure - BBC News

A 1000 year old Anglo Saxon medical book has been found to contain a recipe which could help fight against MRSA  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago
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Bacterial Wall Teichoic Acid Inhibitors and MRSA Susceptibility

Inhibitors of bacterial wall teichoic acid biosynthesis can restore the susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to beta-lactam antibiotics, researchers have reported.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Impact of Universal ICU Staphylococcus Aureus Decolonization

Is ICU decolonization coordinated across hospitals in a region enough to eradicate MRSA completely in that region? This new study investigates.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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New Therapeutic Options for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

Read about the new approved drugs for the treatment of MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Acinetobacter baumannii -- The New MRSA?

Infections caused by this bacteria are commonly multi-drug resistant and can be difficult to treat. Find out what there is to know.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Zorro Swab Detects 20% More MRSA in Nursing Homes

The use of nasal swabs alone can lead to the underdetection of multidrug-resistant organisms, a study of nursing-home residents shows, but comprehensive swabbing can improve detection rates.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Diagnosis and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults - American Family Physician

Community-acquired pneumonia is diagnosed by clinical features (e.g., cough, fever, pleuritic chest pain) and by lung imaging, usually an infiltrate seen on chest radiography. Initial evaluation should determine the need for hospitalization versus outpatient management using validated mortality or severity prediction scores. Selected diagnostic laboratory testing, such as sputum and blood cultures, is indicated for inpatients with severe illness but is rarely useful for outpatients. Initial outpatient therapy should include a macrolide or doxycycline. For outpatients with comorbidities or who have used antibiotics within the previous three months, a respiratory fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, or moxifloxacin), or an oral beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide should be used. Inpatients not admitted to an intensive care unit should receive a respiratory fluoroquinolone, or a beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide. Patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia or who are admitted to the intensive care unit should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic, plus azithromycin or a respiratory fluoroquinolone. Those with risk factors for Pseudomonas should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic (piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem, doripenem, or cefepime), plus an aminoglycoside and azithromycin or an antipseudomonal fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin). Those with risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be given vancomycin or linezolid. Hospitalized patients may be switched from intravenous to oral antibiotics after they have clinical improvement and are able to tolerate oral medications, typically in the first three days. Adherence to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Physicians should promote pneumococcal and influenza vaccination as a means to prevent community-acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal bacteremia.  
aafp.org
over 3 years ago