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121

Extolling the benefits of learning plans

“You’re a boring whore! Fix it.” The barked criticism came like a slap in the face. The director of Les Miserables was right, though. I was a boring whore. Actors need to immerse themselves in their roles, shed inhibitions and squelch embarrassment. I was not managing to do this while rehearsing the Lovely Ladies prostitute scene. My performance was overly self-conscious and restrained. Three days later I found myself at a medical education conference, attending a session discussing learning plans. A popular tool in adult education generally, and a training requirement for all GP registrars, learning plans are actively disliked by many. Done purposely and thoughtfully, they can be of great benefit; completed hastily or reluctantly because they are compulsory, they are next to useless. I have to confess that, as a registrar, my own learning plans were dashed off with little thought, submitted and then promptly forgotten. I’d never thought this technique would work for me. At the conference, the attending educators were instructed to each write a learning plan that addressed an aspect of their non-medical lives. We were asked to choose something that we genuinely wanted to improve. I instantly knew what I’d write about, and completed the task with seriousness and sincerity. The facilitator randomly picked a few participants to read out their learning plans. The topics were predictable: “I want to exercise each morning”, “I want to get at least seven hours of sleep a night” and the like. Yes, you can see where this is leading ... I should have anticipated being called upon, but when the “We have time for one more, how about you?” came, along with direct eye contact and a kindly smile, I momentarily panicked. Surveying the room of mostly middle-aged, male faces, many of whom I didn’t know, I considered making something up on the spot. Instead, I stood up, took a deep breath and read out: “I want to be a more exciting whore.” I then outlined my proposed methods for achieving this objective and how I intended to measure my progress. Without explanation, I then sat down. Silence. Not a sound. Most eyes were glued to me, the others looking anywhere but. The atmosphere was thick with shock, amusement, confusion, suspense and fascination. I didn’t leave them hanging for too long. After my disclosure as to why I chose the topic and the context in which I was “whoring”, there were audible sighs of relief and a sprinkling of laughter throughout the room. It was memorable for those present. Four years later, I still get the occasional question about my “whoring” when I run into certain educators at conferences. I am pleased to report that my learning plan well and truly achieved its aim. I enacted my plan exactly as written and practised diligently. I knew I had been successful when the director instructed me to “Tone it down a bit. This is a family show, you know!” I now feel a lot more comfortable extolling the benefits of learning plans to unconvinced registrars. I tell them: “I used to think that I wasn’t a learning plan-type person either but I’ve discovered that if you choose a relevant and important objective and spend time and effort working out how to achieve it, the technique can really work.” I tend to leave out: “It didn’t do much for my medicine, but it turned me into a fabulous whore.” This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor. Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
almost 8 years ago
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0
12

Chronic kidney Disease ?

Got any good methods of categorising /remembering causes and investigation findings?  
sarah fleming
almost 8 years ago
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4
54

Lumbar Puncture Procedure

A lumbar puncture procedure video which highlights techniques examined in both the MCEM & FCEM exam.  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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317

Socks, Kiwis and Surgical Removal

I’m a klutz. Always have been. Probably always will be. I blame my clumsiness on the fact that I didn’t crawl. Apparently I was sitting around one day and toddling on two feet the next. Whatever the cause, it’s a well-tested fact that I’m not good on icy footpaths. Various parts of my anatomy have gotten up close and personal with frozen ground on many an occasion. Not usually an issue for a born-and-bred Australian, except when said Australian goes to visit her Canadian family during the northern winter. During one such visit, I found myself unceremoniously plopped onto slick ice while my two-year-old niece frolicked around me with sure-footed abandon. I thought, “There has to be an easier way.” As freezing water seeped through my jeans, providing a useful cold pack for my screaming coccyx, my memory was jogged. I recalled that a lateral-thinking group of New Zealand researchers had won the Ignoble Prize for Physics for demonstrating that wearing socks on the outsides of shoes reduces the incidence of falls on icy footpaths. To the amusement of my niece, I tried out the theory for myself on the walk home. I don’t know if I had a more secure foothold or not, but I did manage to get blisters from wearing sneakers without socks. I love socks. They cover my large, ungainly clod-hoppers and keep my toes toasty warm almost all year round. You know the song ‘You can leave your hat on.’? Well for me, it is more a case of ‘You can leave your socks on, especially in winter. There’s nothing unromantic about that… is there? I’m not, however, as attached to my socks as a patient I once treated. As an intern doing a psychiatry rotation, one of my tasks was to do physical examinations on all admissions. Being a dot-the-i’s kinda girl, when an old homeless man declined to remove his socks so that I could examine his feet, I didn’t let it slide. “I haven’t taken off my socks for thirty years,” he pronounced. “It can’t be that long. Your socks aren’t thirty years old. In fact, they look quite new,” I countered. “When the old ones wear out, I just slip a new pair over the top.” I didn’t believe him. From his odour, I would have believed that he hadn’t showered in thirty years, but the sock story didn’t add up. He eventually agreed to let me take them off. The top two sock layers weren’t a problem but then I ran into trouble. Black remains of what used to be socks clung firmly to his feet, and my gentle attempts at their removal resulted in screams of agony. I tried soaking his feet. Still no luck. His skin had grown up into the fibres, and it was impossible to extract the old sock remnants without ripping off skin. In retrospect I probably should have left the old man alone, but instead got the psych registrar to have a peek, who then involved the emergency registrar, who called the surgeon and soon enough the patient and his socks were off to theatre. The ‘surgical removal of socks’ was not a commonly performed procedure, and it provided much staff amusement. It wasn’t so funny for Mr. Sock Man, who required several skin grafts! From my perspective here in Canada, while I thoroughly commend the Kiwis for their ground-breaking sock research, I think I’ll stick to the more traditional socks-in-shoes approach, change my socks regularly and work a bit on my coordination skills. References: PHYSICS PRIZE: Lianne Parkin, Sheila Williams, and Patricia Priest of the University of Otago, New Zealand, for demonstrating that, on icy footpaths in wintertime, people slip and fall less often if they wear socks on the outside of their shoes. "Preventing Winter Falls: A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Novel Intervention," Lianne Parkin, Sheila Williams, and Patricia Priest, New Zealand Medical Journal. vol. 122, no, 1298, July 3, 2009, pp. 31-8. (This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor http://www.australiandoctor.com.au/articles/58/0c06f058.asp) Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
almost 8 years ago
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5
135

Cannulation - Leicester Clinical Skills

Cannulation performed following official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) Guidelines Stage 1 - Consent 0:40 Stage 2 - Equipment 1:53 Stage 3 - Procedure; Treatment Room 3:25 Patient Area 8:01 Stage 4 - After Care 13:23 http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com/  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
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8
179

Venepuncture - Leicester Clinical Skills

Venepuncture performed following official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) Guidelines Stage 1 - Consent 0:39 Stage 2 - Equipment 1:54 Stage 3 - Procedure; Treatment Room 2:48 Patient Area 5:35 Stage 4 - After Care 8:59 http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com/  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
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3
19

Female Catheterisation - Procedure Only

Female catheterisation performed following the official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) guidelines. This video only covers the procedure part of this skill. View our video of the Full Process video for more information. Find more videos and resources at our website: www.leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
Preview
2
59

Blood Cultures - Full Process

Blood Cultures - Full Procedure The Blood Cultures procedure performed following official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) Guidelines Stage 1 - Consent 0:35 Stage 2 - Equipment 2:14 Stage 3 - Procedure 3:24 Stage 4 - After Care 9:59 http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
Preview
1
57

Blood Cultures - Procedure only

Blood Cultures performed following University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) guidelines. This video demonstrates how to perform the procedure only. If you want a more in depth video visit our website or youtube page. http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com/  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
Preview
4
45

Cannulation - Procedure Only

Cannulation Procedure performed following University Hospitals Leicester (UHL) guidelines. Gathering equipment 0:16 Performing procedure 2:59 http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com/  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
Preview
4
34

Male Catheterisation - Procedure Only

Male catheterisation performed following the official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) guidelines. This video only covers the procedure part of this skill. View our video of the Full Process for more information. Find more videos and resources at our website: www.leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 8 years ago
Preview
20
430

Diabetic Foot Examination - OSCE Guide

The ability to carry out a thorough and slick diabetic foot examination is something every medic needs to master. This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the OSCE and you can then customise the examination to suit your own personal style. Make sure to head over to http://geekymedics.com/2010/10/10/diabetic-foot-examination/ to see the written guide alongside the video. Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics You should always adhere to your medical schools / local hospital trusts guidelines when performing examinations or clinical procedures.  
OSCE Videos
almost 8 years ago
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2
122

Venepuncture - How to take blood - OSCE guide

Venepuncture is something every medic needs master, because you'll be required to perform this task frequently in clinical practice and it often appears as an OSCE station. This video takes you through the full procedure step by step. See the written guide alongside the video at http://www.geekymedics.com/osce/venepuncture-how-to-take-blood/ Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Also follow us on twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics Contact us at geekymedics@gmail.com with any questions or feedback. Always refer to your local medical school / hospital guidance before applying any of the steps demonstrated in this video guide.  
OSCE Videos
almost 8 years ago
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113

Biohacking - The Brighter Side of Health

2014 is already more than a month old (if you can believe it) and with each passing day, the world we live in is speeding towards breakthroughs in every sphere of life. We're running full tilt, wanting to be bigger and better than we were the day or the hour before. Every passing day reinvents the 'cutting edge' of technology, including medical progress and advancement. Gone are the medieval days when doctors were considered all knowing deities, while medicine consisted of leeches being used to drain 'bad blood'. Nowadays, health isn't just about waiting around until you pick up an infection, then going to your local GP to get treated; in today's world it's all about sustaining your wellbeing. And for that, the new kid on the block is biohacking. Biohacking is the art and science of maximizing your biological potential. As a hacker aims to gain complete control of the system he's trying to infiltrate, be it social or technological; similarly a biohacker aims to obtain full control of his own biology. Simply put, a biohacker looks for techniques to improve himself and his way of life. Before you let your imagination run away with you and start thinking of genetic experiments gone wrong, let me assure you that a biohack is really just about any activity you can do to increase your capabilities or advance your wellbeing. Exercising daily can be a biohack. So can doing the crossword or solving math sums, if it raises your IQ by a few points or improves your general knowledge. What characterizes biohacking is the end goal and the consequent modification of activities to achieve that goal. So what kind of goals would a biohacker have? World domination? Not quite. Adding more productive hours to the day and more productivity to those hours? Check. Eliminating stress and it's causes from their lives? Check. Improving mood, memory and recall, and general happiness? You bet. So the question arises; aren't we all biohackers of sorts? After all, the above mentioned objectives are what everyone aspires to achieve in their lives at one point or the other. unfortunately for all the lazy people out there (including yours truly), biohacking involves being just a tad bit more pro active than just scribbling down a list of such goals as New Year resolutions! There are two main approaches to selecting a biohack that works for you- the biggest aim and the biggest gain. The biggest aim would be targeting those capabilities, an improvement in which would greatly benefit you. This could be as specific as improving your public speaking skills or as general as working upon your diet so you feel more fit and alert. In today's competitive, cut throat world, even the slightest edge can ensure that you reach the finish line first. The biggest gain would be to choose a technique that is low cost- in other words, one that is beneficial yet doesn't burn a hole through your pocket! It isn't possible to give a detailed description of all the methods pioneering biohackers have initiated, but here are some general areas that you can try to upgrade in your life: Hack your diet- They say you are what you eat. Your energy levels are related to what you eat, when you take your meals, the quantity you consume etc. your mood and mental wellbeing is greatly affected by your diet. I could go on and on, but this point is self expanatory. You need to hack your diet! Eat healthier and live longer. Hack your brain- Our minds are capable of incredible things when they're trained to function productively. Had this not been the case, you and I would still be sitting in our respective caves, shivering and waiting for someone to think long enough to discover fire. You don't have to be a neuroscientist to improve your mental performance-studies show that simply knowing you have the power to improve your intelligence is the first step to doing it. Hack your abilities- Your mindset often determines your capacity to rise to a challenge and your ability to achieve. For instance, if you're told that you can't achieve a certain goal because you're a woman, or because you're black or you're too fat or too short, well obviously you're bound to restrict yourself in a mental prison of your own shortcomings. But it's a brave new world so push yourself further. Try something new, be that tacking on an extra lap to your daily exercise routine or squeezing out the extra time to do some volunteer work. Your talents should keep growing right along with you. Hack your age- You might not be able to do much about those birthday candles that just keep adding up...but you can certainly hack how 'old' you feel. Instead of buying in on the notion that you decline as you grow older, look around you. Even simple things such as breathing and stamina building exercises can change the way you age. We have a responsibility to ourselves and to those around us to live our lives to the fullest. So maximise your potential, push against your boundaries, build the learning curve as you go along. After all, health isn't just the absence of disease but complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and biohacking seems to be Yellow Brick Road leading right to it!  
Huda Qadir
almost 8 years ago
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6
133

What is the Whipple Procedure?

In this video, Washington University surgeon William Hawkins, MD, explains the Whipple procedure, which is performed to remove cancer from the head of the pancreas. Hawkins and his colleagues complete about 125 Whipples a year, making the Siteman Cancer Center one of the highest-volume centers for this type of surgery nationwide. These surgeons pioneered a modification to the Whipple procedure that has resulted in the lowest fistula rate any large group (1.5 percent compared to 15 percent).  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 8 years ago
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0
24

Childhood liver transplant: the transplant

In this first episode of a video series about childhood liver transplant, five adults talk about why they received liver transplants and their memories of the procedure. Find out more at http://www.nhs.uk/childhoodlivertransplant  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 8 years ago
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NEJM Procedure: Deployment of an Endovascular Graft in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

Aneurysm repair is a mechanical solution to the problem of progressive expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the risk of rupture. Although open surgical repair, which has been the established approach, is very effective, it carries substantial risks from the extensive surgical procedure. Endovascular repair was developed to reduce the risks associated with open surgery and to provide a treatment option for patients who are not deemed to be surgical candidates.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 8 years ago