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Foo20151013 2023 1ecatpw?1444774000
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17920

My transition from medical student to patient

I started medical school in 2007 wanting to 'making people better'. I stopped medical school in 2010 facing the reality of not being able to get better myself, being ill and later to be diagnosed with several long term health conditions. This post is about my transition from being a medical student, to the other side - being a patient. There are many things I wish I knew about long-term health conditions and patients when I was a medical student. I hope that through this post, current medical students can become aware of some of theses things and put them into practice as doctors themselves. I went to medical school because I wanted to help people and make them better. I admired doctors up on their pedestals for their knowledge and skills and expertise to 'fix things'. The hardest thing for me was accepting that doctors can't always make people better - they couldn't make me better. Holding doctors so highly meant it was very difficult for me to accept their limitations when it came to incurable long-term conditions and then to accept that as a patient I had capacity myself to help my conditions and situation. Having studied medicine at a very academic university, I had a very strict perception of knowledge. Knowledge was hard and fast medical facts that were taught in a formal setting. I worked all day and night learning the anatomical names for all the muscles in the eye, the cranial nerves and citric acid cycle, not to mention the pharmacology in second year. Being immersed in that academic scientific environment, I correlated expertise with PhDs and papers. It was a real challenge to realise that knowledge doesn't always have to be acquired through a formal educational but that it can be acquired through experience. Importantly, knowledge acquired through experience is equally valid! This means the knowledge my clinicians have developed through studying and working is as valid as my knowledge of my conditions, symptoms and triggers, developed through experiencing it day in day out. I used to feel cross about 'expert patients' - I have spent all these hours in a library learning the biochemistry and pharmacology and 'Joe Bloggs' walks in and knows it all! That wasn't the right attitude, and wasn't fair on patients. As an expert patient myself now, I have come to understood that we are experts through different means, and in different fields. My clinicians remain experts in the biological aspects on disease, but that's not the full picture. I am an expert in the psychological and social impact of my conditions. All aspects need to be taken into account if I am going to have holistic integrated care - the biopsychosocial model in practice - and that's where shared-decision making comes in. The other concept which is has been shattered since making the transition from medical student to patient is that of routine. In my first rotation, orthopaedics and rheumatology, I lost track within the first week of how many outpatient appointments I sat in on. I didn't really think anything of them - they are just another 15 minute slot of time filled with learning in a very busy day. As a patient, my perspective couldn't be more different. I have one appointment with my consultant a year, and spend weeks planning and preparing, then a month recovering emotionally. Earlier this year I wrote a whole post just about this - The Anatomy of an Appointment. Appointments are routine for you - they are not for us! The concept of routine applies to symptoms too. After my first relapse, I had an emergency appointment with my consultant, and presented with very blurred vision and almost total loss of movement in my hands. That very fact I had requested an urgent appointment suggest how worried I was. My consultants response in the appointment was "there is nothing alarming about your symptoms". I fully appreciate that my symptoms may not have meant I was going to drop dead there and then, and that in comparison to his patients in ICU, I was not as serious. But loosing vision and all use of ones hands at the age of 23 (or any age for that matter) is alarming in my books! I guess he was trying to reassure me, but it didn't come across like that! I have a Chiari malformation (in addition to Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Elhers-Danlos Syndrome) and have been referred to a neurosurgeon to discuss the possibility of neurosurgery. It is stating the obvious to say that for a neurosurgeon, brain surgery is routine - it's their job! For me, the prospect of even being referred to a neurosurgeon was terrifying, before I even got to the stage of discussing the operation. It is not a routine experience at all! At the moment, surgery is not needed (phew!) but the initial experience of this contact with neurosurgeons illustrates the concept of routines and how much our perspectives differ. As someone with three quite rare and complex conditions, I am invariable met in A&E with comments like "you are so interesting!". I remember sitting in the hospital cafeteria at lunch as a student and literally feasting on the 'fascinating' cases we had seen on upstairs on the wards that morning. "oh you must go and see that really interesting patient with X, Y and Z!" I am so thankful that you all find medicine so interesting - you need that passion and fascination to help you with the ongoing learning and drive to be a doctor. I found it fascinating too! But I no longer find neurology that interesting - it is too close to home. Nothing is "interesting" if you live with it day in day out. No matter what funky things my autonomic nervous may be doing, there is nothing interesting or fascinating about temporary paralysis, headaches and the day to day grind of my symptoms. This post was inspired by NHS Change Day (13th March 2013) - as a patient, I wanted to share these few things with medical students, what I wish I knew when I was where you are now, to help the next generation of doctors become the very best doctors they can. I wish you all the very best for the rest of your studies, and thank you very much for reading! Anya de Iongh www.thepatientpatient2011.blogspot.co.uk @anyadei  
Anya de Iongh
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1nh0xw?1444774170
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307

A Comedy of Errors

Great people make mistakes. Unfortunately, medicine is a subject where mistakes are not tolerated. Doctors are supposed to be infallible; or, at least, that is the present dogma. Medical students regularly fall victim to expecting too much of themselves, but this is perhaps not a bad trait when enlisting as a doctor. If it weren’t for mistakes in our understanding, then we wouldn’t progress. Studying a BSc in Anatomy has exposed me to the real world of science – where the negative is just as important as the positive. What isn’t there is just as important as what is. If you look into the history of Anatomy, it truly is a comedy of errors. So, here are three top mistakes by three incredibly influential figures who still managed to be remembered for the right reasons. 3. A Fiery Stare Culprit: Alcmaeon of Croton Go back far enough and you’ll bump into someone called Alcmaeon. Around the 5th century, he was one of the first dissectors – but not an anatomist. Alcmaeon was concerned with human intellect and was desperately searching for the seat of the soul. He made a number of major errors - quite understandable for his time! Alcmaeon insisted that sleep occurs when the blood vessels filled and we wake when they empty. Perhaps the most outrageous today is the fact that he insisted the eyes contained water both fire and water… Don’t be quick to mock. Alcmaeon identified the optic tract, the brain as the seat of the mind (along with Herophilus) and the Eustachian tubes. 2. Heart to Heart Culprit: Claudius Galen Legend has it that Galen’s father had a dream in which an angel/deity visited him and told him that his son would be a great physician. That would have to make for a pretty impressive opening line in a personal statement by today’s standards. Galen was highly influential on modern day medicine and his treatise of Anatomy and healing lasted for over a thousand years. Many of Galen’s mistakes were due to his dissections of animals rather than humans. Unfortunately, dissection was banned in Galen’s day and where his job as physician to the gladiators provided some nice exposed viscera to study, it did not allow him to develop a solid foundation. Galen’s biggest mistake lay in the circulation. He was convinced that blood flowed in a back and forth, ebb-like motion between the chambers of the heart and that it was burnt by muscle for fuel. Many years later, great physician William Harvey proposed our modern understanding of circulation. 1. The Da Vinci Code Culprit: Leonardo Da Vinci If you had chance to see the Royal Collection’s latest exhibition then you were in for a treat. It showcased the somewhat overlooked anatomical sketches of Leonardo Da Vinci. A man renowned for his intelligence and creativity, Da Vinci also turns out to be a pretty impressive anatomist. In his sketches he produces some of the most advanced 3D representations of the human skeleton, muscles and various organs. One theory of his is, however, perplexing. In his sketches is a diagram of the spinal cord……linked to penis. That’s right, Da Vinci was convinced the two were connected (no sexist comments please) and that semen production occurred inside the brain and spinal cord, being stored and released at will. He can be forgiven for the fact that he remarkably corrected himself some years later. His contributions to human physiology are astounding for their time including identification of a ‘hierarchal’ nervous system, the concept of equal ‘inheritence’ and identification of the retina as a ‘light sensing organ’. The list of errors is endless. However, they’re not really errors. They’re signposts that people were thinking. All great people fail, otherwise they wouldn’t be great.  
Lucas Brammar
about 6 years ago
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9
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Gross Anatomy - Brachial Plexus - Nerves and Muscles of the Upper Limb

This video will help you understand the components of the brachial plexus and the problems that arise when one or several of the nerves to the upper limb are...  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
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8
529

Muscle relaxant drugs

Overview of muscle relaxant drugs used during anaesthesia.  
Nigel Harper
almost 9 years ago
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8
761

An easy way to remember arm muscles

Dr Preddy teaching anatomy at Touro University Nevada.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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Upper Extremity - Anatomy Ocsi with Willard at University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine - StudyBlue

Study online flashcards and notes for Upper Extremity including Superficial muscles (layer 1) of anterior compartment of forearm.: Pronator teres Flexor carpi radialis Palmaris longus Flexor carpi ulnaris ; Flexor Ca  
StudyBlue
almost 6 years ago
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Myology - Skeletal Muscle (Sarcomere, Myosin and Actin)

http://armandoh.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan ...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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An easy way to remember arm muscles PART 1

Dr Preddy teaching anatomy at Touro University Nevada  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
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7
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Biochemistry Help: The Cori Cycle

The Cori Cycle is responsible for removing excess Lactic acid or Lactate from the muscle. It is then uptaken by the Liver where it is converted back into Pyruvate, then into Glucose again. This video explains how!  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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6
306

Abdominal X-Ray - Small bowel obstruction

Small bowel obstruction can be identified by the dilated loops of centrally placed bowel with the venae commitantes (circular bands of muscle) that span the entire width of the bowel as opposed to tenae coli in the large bowel which only span part of it.  
Rhys Clement
about 10 years ago
29972
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Ophthalmology Vodcast

This vodcast is one in a series developed by Dundee PRN, a student lead initiative providing an online medical student network for Dundee. This vodcast provides an overview of the muscles of the eye, for example, how the superior rectus moves the eye down and in via the trochlear and relevant pathology. This video serves as a stand alone piece of learning but can also be re-used in a number of learning contexts and embedded into other learning resources.  
Joshua Scales
over 8 years ago
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6
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Obliquus capitis inferior muscle - Dorsal View

This image is part of our online anatomy trainer. We are happy to share it with the meducation community. Stop worrying about learning anatomy and start doing it the efficient way. Sign up at [www.kenhub.com](https://www.kenhub.com "www.kenhub.com") to pass your next anatomy exam with ease.  
Niels Hapke
over 6 years ago
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6
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muscle and nerve pains

A helpful guide to know the source of the patient's complain during physiotherapy examination.  
Fatima Zahra
almost 6 years ago
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Cardiac conduction system and its relationship with ECG‬

The heart's conductions system controls the generation and propagation of electric signals or action potentials causing the hearts muscles to contract and th...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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6
478

Histology Tutor

text/html; charset=windows-1252; Tutorials on Histology. How to identify tissues (Epithelium, Connective Tissue, Nervous Tissue, Muscle). Includes links to the histology zoomer.  
www2.yvcc.edu
about 5 years ago
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230

The Extraocular Muscles - Study Resource

Described are extraocular muscles and how they move the human eye.  
tedmontgomery.com
over 4 years ago
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6
269

Brains, Bodies, and Behavior

The nervous system is composed of more than 100 billion cells known as neurons . A neuron is a cell in the nervous system whose function it is to receive and transmit information . As you can see in Figure3.2, “Components of the Neuron” , neurons are made up of three major parts: a cell body, or soma , which contains the nucleus of the cell and keeps the cell alive ; a branching treelike fiber known as the dendrite , which collects information from other cells and sends the information to the soma ; and a long, segmented fiber known as the axon , which transmits information away from the cell body toward other neurons or to the muscles and glands .  
peoi.org
about 4 years ago
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Rotator Cuff Tendonitis

Having shoulder pain or problems lifting your arms over your head? You may have tendonitis or a tear in the muscles and tendons that hold your shoulder in pl...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Sternocleidomastoid

This is a song listing all of the muscles in the upper and lower limbs that we developed to the tune of 'the element song' to help people with revision!  
Adam Bonfield
almost 9 years ago