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17

Myology - Skeletal Muscle (Sarcomere, Myosin and Actin)

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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4
128

Myology - Skeletal Muscle Contraction

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Image: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8Ss3-wJfHrpdnNrVFY5TVc1WGs/edit?usp=sharing  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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23

Myology - Skeletal Muscle (Structure)

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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13

Myology - Introduction (Skeletal, Cardiac, Smooth Muscles)

Brief Intro to the muscular System  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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4
38

Neuromuscular Junction

Talks about the space between a neuron and muscle, and describes with a bit of detail about this relationship. http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan PDF: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8Ss3-wJfHrpSE5NQThYR051UGc  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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20
619

Cardiac conduction system and its relationship with ECG

The heart's conductions system controls the generation and propagation of electric signals or action potentials causing the hearts muscles to contract and the heart to pump blood.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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3
108

Muscle Muscle Tissue and the Sarcomere

Covers the types and characteristics of muscular tissue and microscopic anatomy of skeletal muscle.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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21

Ophthalmology Lecture - Eye Anatomy Part 3

This lecture covers the retina, optic nerve, eye muscles, and the orbital bones.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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7

Superior Oblique Myokymia

This is an uncommon ophthalmology finding. With this disorder, the superior oblique muscle spasmically fires, and the eye rotates. Look closely at one of the conjunctival vessels and you can see it move. This is different than rotary nystagmus, as nystagmus are more rhythmic.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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14

Ophthalmology finding: Inclusion cyst on the eye

This is an inclusion cyst on the conjunctiva of the eye. These can occur after surgery (often after muscle surgery) and are simply fluid/oil filled cyst from trapped epithelial cells.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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9
347

Cranial Nerve 4 Palsy

This excerpt comes from a neuro-ophthalmology lecture from Ophthobook.com. Fourth nerve palsies effect the superior oblique muscle (trochlea).  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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4
115

Neuro-Ophthalmology Lecture

This is the first 10 minutes of the neuroophthalmology eye lecture from Ophthobook.com. This lecture covers eye-muscle and ocular movement including the direction of action for all the eye muscles and how to document your exam findings.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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654

An easy way to remember arm muscles

Dr Preddy teaching anatomy at Touro University Nevada.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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58

muscle and nerve pains

A helpful guide to know the source of the patient's complain during physiotherapy examination.  
Fatima Zahra
over 4 years ago
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4

burn persian

Anatomy & Physiology of the Skin • Layers – Epidermis – Dermis – Subcutaneous – Underlying Structures • Fascia • Nerves • Tendons • Ligaments • Muscles • Organ…  
rezachpi
almost 4 years ago
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3
74

The Precise Neurological Exam

Ptosis is the lagging of an eyelid. It has 2 distinct etiologies. Sympathetics going to the eye innervate Muller's muscle, a small muscle that elevates the eyelid. The III cranial nerve also innervates a much larger muscle that elevates the eye lid: the levator palpebrae. Thus, disruption of either will cause ptosis. The ptosis from a III nerve palsy is of greater severity than the ptosis due to a lesion of the sympathetic pathway, due to the size of the muscles innervated. As an aside, the parasympathetics run with the III cranial nerve and are usually affected with an abnormal III cranial nerve.  
informatics.med.nyu.edu
over 4 years ago
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4
220

Anatomy of the Shoulder and Rotator Cuff

The rotator cuff (rotor cuff) is a term given to the group of muscles and their tendons that act to stabilize the shoulder. The Rotator Cuff muscles are connected individually to a group of flat tendons, which fuse together and surround the front, the back, and the top of the shoulder joint. The Rotator Cuff ligaments attach bone to bone and provide stability to the shoulder joint bones.  
aidmyrotatorcuff.com
over 4 years ago
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422

Upper Extremity - Anatomy Ocsi with Willard at University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine - StudyBlue

Study online flashcards and notes for Upper Extremity including Superficial muscles (layer 1) of anterior compartment of forearm.: Pronator teres Flexor carpi radialis Palmaris longus Flexor carpi ulnaris ; Flexor Ca  
StudyBlue
over 4 years ago