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Immune Evasion of Cancer

This diagram was created to summarise my dissertation. It shows numerous methods of immune evasion methods of a cancer cell. I did a lot of research around this subject and never found a diagram that brought this number of methods together, so created one.  
Deleted User
about 8 years ago
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335

Comprehensive Notes on the Molecular Basis of Cancer

Molecular Basis of Cancer Rate of Growth Most benign tumours grow slowly, and most cancers grow much faster, eventually spreading locally and to distant sites …  
Stephen McAleer
over 7 years ago
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Cancer notes

Some useful notes on cancer and principles of oncology.  
Aoibhin McGarrity
over 7 years ago
Edce3e87bdda2e7f4f453f0fe2fbc6ba48a9c75e5951743973610464
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200 Years of Medicine

A short documentary that explores three remarkable stories of medical progress in Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Surgery.  
youtube.com
over 5 years ago
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305

Neoplasia nomenclature poster

The basics of nomenclature concerning Neoplasia are covered concisely and succinctly in one A3 size poster. Being able to correctly name tumours of differing origin can be a challenging task for new medical students, this teaching poster aims to aid the process.  
Aagash Vadera
over 9 years ago
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286

Biomarkers in cancer

Biomarkers in cancer “A characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, pathological processes, or re…  
Stephen McAleer
over 7 years ago
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440

HPV and Cervical Cancer

CANCER FOCUS - CERVICAL CANCER IN A REGION OF THE UK: NORTHERN IRELAND  
Stephen McAleer
over 7 years ago
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269

New research helps explain why a deadly blood cancer often affects children with malaria | Newswire

In equatorial Africa, a region of the globe known as the “lymphoma belt,” children are ten times more likely than in other parts of the world to develop Burkitt’s lymphoma, a highly aggressive blood cancer that can be fatal if left untreated. That area is also plagued by high rates of malaria, and scientists have spent the last 50 years trying to understand how the two diseases are connected.  
newswire.rockefeller.edu
almost 5 years ago
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121

Palliative Symptom Management

Comprehensive notes on the management of breathlessness, nausea and vomiting in terminal cancer.  
Stephen McAleer
over 7 years ago
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Disorders of the Posterior Pituitary

Be aware that any posterior pituitary disease (DI, SIADH) may also present with sx of *anterior* hypopituitarism as well (amenorrhea, gynecomastia, low libido, dry skin, cold intolerance, weight gain, poor appetite, etc.). This happens if the underlying cause is tumor or trauma.  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer Testicular cancers, 95 percent of which are germ cell tumours, have become one of the most curable solid neoplasms because of remarkable trea…  
Stephen McAleer
over 7 years ago
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132

What is the Whipple Procedure?

In this video, Washington University surgeon William Hawkins, MD, explains the Whipple procedure, which is performed to remove cancer from the head of the pancreas. Hawkins and his colleagues complete about 125 Whipples a year, making the Siteman Cancer Center one of the highest-volume centers for this type of surgery nationwide. These surgeons pioneered a modification to the Whipple procedure that has resulted in the lowest fistula rate any large group (1.5 percent compared to 15 percent).  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
Canceroverview
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The Biology of Cancer

The oldest descriptions of cancer were written in Egypt as early as 3000 B.C., as part of an ancient Egyptian textbook on surgery. The name, "cancer" comes from the Greek word carcinos, which means crab. Hippocrates used this term to describe the disease because of the projections of a cancer invading nearby tissues. During the 16th century, when the theory of bodily humors prevailed, it was believed that an excess of black bile caused cancer. The renowned anatomist Andreas Vesalius searched diligently for this black bile and ultimately discarded the this theory when he was unable to find it. In 1838 a botanist named Matthias Schleiden and Theodor Schwann, a physiologist, proposed that all living things were composed of fundamental units called cells. Shortly after the introduction of this idea, Virchow (the "father" of pathology) proposed that cells only arose from other cells and that growth could only occur as a result of hypertrophy or hyperplasia. Virchow studied cancers under with a microscope and recognized that they represented hyperplasia in an extreme form that he dubbed "neoplasia."  
sphweb.bumc.bu.edu
over 5 years ago
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662

PSA To Test or Not To Test

A popular early screening test for the 2nd deadliest cancer in men is falling out of favor. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has concluded there is ve...  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
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5
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Palliative Pain Management

Comprehensive notes on the management of pain, particularly in terminal cancer.  
Stephen McAleer
over 7 years ago
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What it means to be an Australian with skin cancer

Each year on the 26th of January, Australia Day, Australians of all shapes, sizes and political persuasions are encouraged to reflect on what it means to be living in this big, brown, sunny land of ours. It is a time to acknowledge past wrongs, honour outstanding Australians, welcome new citizens, and perhaps toss a lamb chop on the barbie (barbecue), enjoying the great Australian summer. It is also a time to count our blessings. Australians whinge a lot about our health system. While I am certainly not suggesting the model we have is anywhere near perfect, it could be a whole lot worse. I recently read this NY times article which talks about the astronomical and ever-rising health care costs in the US and suggests that this, at least sometimes, involves a lack of informed consent (re: costs and alternative treatment options). The US is certainly not the “land of the free” when it comes to health care. There are many factors involved, not least being the trend in the US to provide specialised care for conditions that are competently and cost-effectively dealt with in primary care (by GPs) in Australia. The article gives examples such as a five minute consult conducted by a dermatologist, during which liquid nitrogen was applied to a wart, costing the patient $500. In Australia, (if bulk billed by a GP) it would have cost the patient nothing and the taxpayer $16.60 (slightly higher if the patient was a pensioner). It describes a benign mole shaved off by a nurse practitioner (with a scalpel, no stitches) costing the patient $914.56. In Australia, it could be done for under $50. The most staggering example of all was the description of the treatment of a small facial Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) which cost over $25000 (no, that is not a typo – twenty five THOUSAND dollars). In Australia, it would probably have cost the taxpayer less than $200 for its removal (depending on exact size, location and method of closure). The patient interviewed for the article was sent for Mohs surgery (and claims she was not given a choice in the matter). Mohs (pronounced “Moe’s” as in Moe’s Tavern from The Simpsons) is a highly effective technique for treating skin cancer and minimises the loss of non-cancerous tissue (in traditional skin cancer surgery you deliberately remove some of the surrounding normal skin to ensure you’ve excised all of the cancerous cells) . Wikipedia entry on Mohs. This can be of great benefit in a small minority of cancers. However, this super-specialised technique is very expensive and time/ labour intensive. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it has become extremely popular in the US. ”Moh’s for everything” seems to be the new catch cry when it comes to skin cancer treatment in the US. In the past two years, working very part time in skin cancer medicine in Australia, I have diagnosed literally hundreds of BCCs (Basal Cell Carcinomas). The vast majority of these I successfully treated (ie cured) in our practice without needing any specialist help. A handful were referred to general or plastic surgeons and one, only one, was referred for Mohs surgery. The nearest Mohs surgeon being 200 kilometres away from our clinic may have something to do with the low referral rate, but the fact remains, most BCCs (facial or otherwise), can be cured and have a good cosmetic outcome, without the need for Mohs surgery. To my mind, using Mohs on garden variety BCCs is like employing a team of chefs to come into your kitchen each morning to place bread in your toaster and then butter it for you. Overkill. Those soaking up some fine Aussie sunshine on the beach or at a backyard barbie with friends this Australia Day, gifting their skin with perfect skin-cancer-growing conditions, may wish to give thanks that when their BCCs bloom, affordable (relative to costs in the US, at least) treatment is right under their cancerous noses. Being the skin cancer capital of the world is perhaps not a title of which Australians should be proud, but the way we can treat them effectively, without breaking the bank, should be. Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
over 6 years ago
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EHealthStar | Evidence Based Health Articles

A list of causes with symptoms; constipation, anxiety, enlarged prostate, pregnancy, overactive bladder, UTI, STD, drugs, diabetes mellitus/insipidus, cancer  
ehealthstar.com
about 5 years ago
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Refocusing Cancer Drug Approval on Patients

On July 10th, the House approved health legislation, known as the 21st Century Cures Act, to streamline how the government approves drugs and medical dev...  
huffingtonpost.com
almost 5 years ago