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NervousSystem

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Recent Achievements in Stem Cell-mediated Myelin Repair

Regeneration of myelin presents a promising approach for treating multiple sclerosis. What's the current state of research on the application of stem cell-mediated myelin repair?  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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This is your brain. This is your brain on LSD

First scans of a brain on LSD show it lighting up like a pinball machine.  
miamiherald.com
over 3 years ago
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Brain Anatomy Live Painting - Lobes of the Brain

This video summarises the structure and function of the cerebral cortex (frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes), cerebellum and spinal cord.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Organization of the Nervous System

Learn about the central and peripheral systems, as well as the autonomic and somatic systems, with Professor Nilson of the University of British Columbia.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Daisy Brains Blog - Your Brain Deserves a Workout

Your Brain Deserves a Workout  
daisybrains.com
over 3 years ago
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The Human Brain

In this activity you will explore the human brain, the key element of the nervous system. You will learn about its main areas and their functions in regulating everyday life. Understanding the brain's role in all manner of human activity is a central topic in psychology.  
learner.org
over 3 years ago
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Program 3: The Behaving Brain

The Behaving Brain is the third program in the DISCOVERING PSYCHOLOGY series. This program looks at the structure and composition of the human brain: how neurons function, how information is collected and transmitted, and how chemical reactions relate to thought and behavior.  
learner.org
over 3 years ago
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Human brain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The human brain is the main organ of the human central nervous system. It is located in the head, protected by the skull. It has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but with a more developed cerebral cortex. Large animals such as whales and elephants have larger brains in absolute terms, but when measured using a measure of relative brain size, which compensates for body size, the quotient for the human brain is almost twice as large as that of a bottlenose dolphin, and three times as large as that of a chimpanzee, though the quotient for a treeshrew's brain is larger than that of a human's.[3] Much of the size of the human brain comes from the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal lobes, which are associated with executive functions such as self-control, planning, reasoning, and abstract thought. The area of the cerebral cortex devoted to vision, the visual cortex, is also greatly enlarged in humans compared to other animals.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Pesticide in Milk Linked to Lower Neuron Density

An autopsy study shows high intake of milk many years earlier was associated with lower neuron count in the substantia nigra of brains from people without Parkinson's.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Somatotype and constitutional psychology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Somatotype is a taxonomy developed in the 1940s, by American psychologist William Herbert Sheldon, to categorise the human physique according to the relative contribution of three fundamental elements, somatotypes, named after the three germ layers of embryonic development: the endoderm, (develops into the digestive tract), the mesoderm, (becomes muscle, heart and blood vessels), and the ectoderm (forms the skin and nervous system).[1] His initial visual methodology has been discounted as subjective, but later formulaic variations of the methodology, developed by his original research assistant Barbara Heath, and later Lindsay Carter and Rob Rempel are still in academic use.[2][3][4]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Emotion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Emotion, in everyday speech, is any relatively brief conscious experience characterized by intense mental activity and a high degree of pleasure or displeasure.[1][2] Scientific discourse has drifted to other meanings and there is no consensus on a definition. Emotion is often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation.[3] In some theories, cognition is an important aspect of emotion. Those acting primarily on emotion may seem as if they are not thinking, but mental processes are still essential, particularly in the interpretation of events. For example, the realization of danger and subsequent arousal of the nervous system (e.g. rapid heartbeat and breathing, sweating, muscle tension) is integral to the experience of fear. Other theories, however, claim that emotion is separate from and can precede cognition.  
en.wikipedia.org
almost 4 years ago
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James–Lange theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The James–Lange theory refers to a hypothesis on the origin and nature of emotions and is one of the earliest theories of emotion within modern psychology. It was developed independently by two 19th-century scholars, William James and Carl Lange. The basic premise of the theory is that physiological arousal instigates the experience of emotion.[1] Instead of feeling an emotion and subsequent physiological (bodily) response, the theory proposes that the physiological change is primary, and emotion is then experienced when the brain reacts to the information received via the body's nervous system.  
en.wikipedia.org
almost 4 years ago
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Direct Evidence for Viral Infection of Neurons

The first direct evidence that viruses can infect neuronal cells has been reported, giving more weight to the idea that viral infections may contribute to certain neurologic diseases.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Brains, Bodies, and Behavior

The nervous system is composed of more than 100 billion cells known as neurons . A neuron is a cell in the nervous system whose function it is to receive and transmit information . As you can see in Figure3.2, “Components of the Neuron” , neurons are made up of three major parts: a cell body, or soma , which contains the nucleus of the cell and keeps the cell alive ; a branching treelike fiber known as the dendrite , which collects information from other cells and sends the information to the soma ; and a long, segmented fiber known as the axon , which transmits information away from the cell body toward other neurons or to the muscles and glands .  
peoi.org
almost 4 years ago
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Tumors of the Central Nervous System - CRASH! Medical Review Series

*Erratum (24:18): Meningioma is associated w/ NF-2, not NF-1. (Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensi...  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - Causes, Treatment & Therapies - Gold Canyon AZ

The Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is an unceasing pain condition that often affects one of the limbs (that can be arms, legs, hands, or feet), generally after an injury or trauma to that particular limb. Complex regional pain syndrome is believed to be caused due to damage, or malfunctioning of the peripheral and central nervous systems. The central nervous system encompasses the brain and spinal cord; whereas the peripheral nervous system includes the nerve signaling from the brain and the spinal cord to the other parts of the body. The Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is exemplified by prolonged or a chronic pain and mild or dramatic changes in the color of the skin, temperature or even swelling in the affecting area.  
calmareaz.com
almost 4 years ago
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index.html

     Activities Index Chapter Activity Names 1 Levels of Biological Organization Dorsal and Ventral Cavities Body Planes Anatomical Terminology:Orientation and Directional Terms 2 The Structure of Atoms Common Elements in Living Organisms Electron Arrangement Ionic Bonds Covalent Bonds Characteristics of Acids, Bases, and Salts 3 Parts of the Cell: Structure Structure of the Plasma Membrane Membrane Transport Selective Permeability Passive Transport Identifying Connective Tissue 4 Structure of the Skin 5 Microscopic Structure of Compact Bone Common Types of Fractures Facial Bones Typical Vertebra Classification of Bones Types of Synovial Joints 6 Connective Tissue Wrappings of Skeletal Muscle Microscopic Anatomy of Skeletal Fiber Organizational Level of Skeletal Muscles Graded Muscle Responses Muscles of the Body Posterior Surface Musclulature 7 Glial Cells and Their Functions Classification of Neurons The Human Brain: Sagittal Section Parts of the Brain Meninges of the Brain Anatomy of the Spinal Cord Cranial Nerves Structure of a Nerve Descriptions of Cranial Nerves Distribution of Spinal Nerves 8 Internal Structures of the Eye Optics of the Eye Internal Structures of the Ear 9 Hormones and Their Target Cells Ionic Calcium Levels in Blood Regulation of Blood Sugar Levels by Insulin and Glycogen 10 Formed Elements 11 External Anatomy of the Heart Frontal Section of the Heart Intrinsic Conduction System of the Heart Arterial Circulation Veins of the Systemic Circulation 12 Lymphatic Collecting Vessels and Regional Lymph Nodes Events in Allergic Reactions 13 Anatomy of the Upper Respiratory Tract Gas Transport 14 Digestive System Basic Structure of the Alimentary Wall Gastrointestinal Tract Activities Overview of Cellular Respiration 15 Anatomy and Function of the Nephron Nephron Activity Early Filtrate Processing 16 Male Reproductive Anatomy: Sagittal View The Female Menstrual Cycle  
media.pearsoncmg.com
almost 4 years ago
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Improving outcomes for people with brain and other central nervous system tumours | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

NICE has developed guidance on the healthcare that should be provided for people with brain tumours and other central nervous system tumours. It recommends which healthcare professionals should be involved in treatment and care, and the types of hospital or cancer centre best suited to that care.  
nice.org.uk
almost 4 years ago
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MIT discovers the location of memories: Individual neurons | ExtremeTech

y triggering a single neuron, the researchers were able to force the subject to recall a specific memory. By removing ...  
extremetech.com
almost 4 years ago