New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In
view moderators

Neuroanatomy

Preview
135
11409

Draw the Brachial Plexus in 37.6 Seconds

Learn to draw the brachial plexus quickly and accurately. You will also learn the names of the 16 terminal branches and the muscles they innervate.  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
Preview 300x212
1157
36190

Cranial Nerves - Anatomy, Clinical Signs and Study Tips

This is a teaching resource that aids the student in memorisation of the Cranial Nerves, their anatomical path and function. Additionally, it stimulates a clinical approach to the functions of the Cranial Nerves, with some 'not to be missed' signs.  
Thomas Lemon
over 5 years ago
Img0
52
2691

A Brief Introduction to Neuroanatomy: Nerve Spotting

An introduction to the basic anatomy of the cranial nerves. This presentation covers the functions, paths and general anatomy of the 12 Cranial Nerves which I hope you will find useful. Just a note: I mention something to do with taste and Vb, please ignore this (the trigeminal nerve does not have any TASTE function). This branch merely supplies general sensation to the anterior 2/3rds of the tongue - apologies!  
Lucas Brammar
almost 5 years ago
Img0
45
2391

A Brief Introduction to Neuroanatomy: The Great Vessels (part 4)

An outline of the key arteries supplying the brain and brain stem is given with a brief description of the pathology of stroke. We then explore the venous sinuses and finally the ventricular system of the brain. ALL PARTS 1) https://meducation.net/resources/30404-A-Brief-Introduction-to-Neuro-Anatomy-The-Major-Cord-part1- 2[Part 2: Unlocking the Cranial Vault] https://www.meducation.net/media_files/30405 3 [Part 3: Nerve Spotting] https://www.meducation.net/resources/30459 4. https://meducation.net/resources/30473-A-Brief-Introduction-to-Neuroanatomy-The-Great-Vessels  
Lucas Brammar
almost 5 years ago
Img0
43
2147

A Brief Introduction to Neuroanatomy: Unlocking the Cranial Vault

Anatomy of the Skull and an overview of the brain, brainstem and meninges. Points of clinical relevance and medical imaging are referenced throughout.  
Lucas Brammar
about 5 years ago
65c83078c8cfd0806669161f3a2904fd69d65f618328381375920135
34
1686

Illustrated Anatomy of Upper-limb

An illustrated overview of the nerve supply ,muscles and important landmarks of the upper-limb  
Sarosh Kamal
over 1 year ago
236c1405d34dab31072b49c3f2b4a55655bda34a6482671256260284
32
5437

Ascending & Descending Pathways of the Spinal Cord

This is a tutorial on the ascending & descending pathways of the spinal cord covers some topics important for classes such as anatomy, neuroanatomy and histology.  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
Preview
23
1299

Funky Anatomy EXAM ANSWERS The Brachial Plexus Made Easy

http://www.thefunkyprofessor.com The Funky Professor introduces our new series of videos, designed to help you ace your exams. Our videos cover common exam q...  
YouTube
almost 4 years ago
F000e97aa13e2b7226d2615b5d4add5b
13
449

A 21st Century Map of the Brain

Can you imagine being able to search for locations in the human body in the same way you can on Google Maps? This thinking lead Programmer Rich Stoner to create this amazing video of a 21st Century Map of the Brain which was our most popular tweet last week. A 21st Century Map of the Brain http://t.co/tkojzJBW55 via @brianglanz #openscience— Meducation (@Meducation) October 18, 2013 Rich writes in his blog - “Now we can quickly search Google Maps for a location, ask what is nearby, and even see what it looks like using StreetView. Now, imagine if something like that existed for the human brain: an interactive environment to search, visualize, and explore layers upon layers of neuroanatomy. This is the dream of cortical cartographers (also known as neuroanatomists). 10 years ago, one of the largest brain mapping initiatives was founded by Paul Allen with a single goal: to build a 21st Century Map of the Brain.” Click here to read more. The mapping of the brain is a working progress and therefore not 100% accurate. Even so the video gives us an insight into the innovate ways we will be able to interact with science in the future. You can follow Meducation on twitter to see more tweets like this at twitter.com/meducation.  
Nicole Chalmers
about 4 years ago
Preview
11
521

Draw the Brachial Plexus in 10 seconds

An easy way to draw the basic components of the brachial plexus. On paper, it's pretty easy to draw the brachial plexus using this method in around 10 seconds. I know I fumbled on a few words here and there but that shouldn't distract from how easy it can be to draw the brachial plexus.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 3 years ago
Preview
9
1736

Neuroanatomy - Cranial Nerves

Anatomy of Cranial Nerves http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 4 years ago
Preview
9
466

Cerebellum Anatomy and Physiology

Clinical anatomy and physiology or cerebellum  
slideshare.net
about 2 years ago
Preview
8
761

NeuroAnatomy

NeuroAnatomy  
donsnotes.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
8
584

Coronal Section of Brain ( simplified)

 
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
7
1018

Netter atlas of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology

Complete Netter atlas of Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology  
SlideShare
over 2 years ago
Preview
7
618

Netter atlas de neuroanatomia

Atlas of Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology Selections from the Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations Illustrations by Frank H. Netter, MD John A. Craig, MD…  
SlideShare
over 2 years ago
Preview
6
2055

Facial Nerve 1/4 - Neuroanatomy

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
Preview
7
134

SCRUBS: Brain Stem and Cranial Nerves (Part 1/6) - Prof. T. Hope

SCRUBS Surgical Society (University of Nottingham) Presents: Prof Hope Neuroanatomy Series Podcast 2 - Brain Stem and Cranial Nerves This lecture covers the anatomy of the brain stem and cranial nerves, with key focus on clinical relevance. Prof Hope is a talented, and very entertaining consultant neurosurgeon based at QMC, Nottingham. He personally designed this lecture series for Nottingham Medical Students on behalf of SCRUBS to be packed full of important clinical neuroanatomy and surgery. This lecture is perfect for any final year medical students, or those studying for their pre-clinical neuroanatomy exams.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 4 years ago
Preview
3
131

Limbic System

From a talk I gave as a med student on the neuroanatomy of the Limbic System. Hope you enjoy these slides and find them helpful.  
BL MK
over 4 years ago
29747
3
441

Cerebellar Neuroanatomy

Introduction Examination of the cranial nerves allows one to "view" the brainstem all the way from its rostral to caudal extent. The brainstem can be divided into three levels, the midbrain, the pons and the medulla. The cranial nerves for each of these are: 2 for the midbrain (CN 3 & 4), 4 for the pons (CN 5-8), and 4 for the medulla (CN 9-12). It is important to remember that cranial nerves never cross (except for one exception, the 4th CN) and clinical findings are always on the same side as the cranial nerve involved. Cranial nerve findings when combined with long tract findings (corticospinal and somatosensory) are powerful for localizing lesions in the brainstem. Cranial Nerve 1 Olfaction is the only sensory modality with direct access to cerebral cortex without going through the thalamus. The olfactory tracts project mainly to the uncus of the temporal lobes. Cranial Nerve 2 This cranial nerve has important localizing value because of its "x" axis course from the eye to the occipital cortex. The pattern of a visual field deficit indicates whether an anatomical lesion is pre- or postchiasmal, optic tract, optic radiation or calcarine cortex. Cranial Nerve 3 and 4 These cranial nerves give us a view of the midbrain. The 3rd nerve in particular can give important anatomical localization because it exits the midbrain just medial to the cerebral peduncle. The 3rd nerve controls eye adduction (medial rectus), elevation (superior rectus), depression (inferior rectus), elevation of the eyelid (levator palpebrae superioris), and parasympathetics for the pupil. The 4th CN supplies the superior oblique muscle, which is important to looking down and in (towards the midline). Pontine Level Cranial nerves 5, 6, 7, and 8 are located in the pons and give us a view of this level of the brainstem. Cranial Nerve 6 This cranial nerve innervates the lateral rectus for eye abduction. Remember that cranial nerves 3, 4 and 6 must work in concert for conjugate eye movements; if they don't then diplopia (double vision) results. The medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) connects the 6th nerve nucleus to the 3rd nerve nucleus for conjugate movement. Major Oculomotor Gaze Systems Eye movements are controlled by 4 major oculomotor gaze systems, which are tested for on the neurological exam. They are briefly outlined here: Saccadic (frontal gaze center to PPRF (paramedian pontine reticular formation) for rapid eye movements to bring new objects being viewed on to the fovea. Smooth Pursuit (parietal-occipital gaze center via cerebellar and vestibular pathways) for eye movements to keep a moving image centered on the fovea. Vestibulo-ocular (vestibular input) keeps image steady on fovea during head movements. Vergence (optic pathways to oculomotor nuclei) to keep image on fovea predominantly when the viewed object is moved near (near triad- convergence, accommodation and pupillary constriction) Cranial Nerve 5 The entry zone for this cranial nerve is at the mid pons with the motor and main sensory (discriminatory touch) nucleus located at the same level. The axons for the descending tract of the 5th nerve (pain and temperature) descend to the level of the upper cervical spinal cord before they synapse with neurons of the nucleus of the descending tract of the 5th nerve. Second order neurons then cross over and ascend to the VPM of the thalamus. Cranial Nerve 7 This cranial nerve has a motor component for muscles of facial expression (and, don't forget, the strapedius muscle which is important for the acoustic reflex), parasympathetics for tear and salivary glands, and sensory for taste (anterior two-thirds of the tongue). Central (upper motor neuron-UMN) versus Peripheral (lower motor neuron-LMN) 7th nerve weakness- with a peripheral 7th nerve lesion all of the muscles ipsilateral to the affected nerve will be weak whereas with a "central 7th ", only the muscles of the lower half of the face contralateral to the lesion will be weak because the portion of the 7th nerve nucleus that supplies the upper face receives bilateral corticobulbar (UMN) input. Cranial Nerve 8 This nerve is a sensory nerve with two divisions- acoustic and vestibular. The acoustic division is tested by checking auditory acuity and with the Rinne and Weber tests. The vestibular division of this nerve is important for balance. Clinically it be tested with the oculocephalic reflex (Doll's eye maneuver) and oculovestibular reflex (ice water calorics). Medullary Level Cranial nerves 9,10,11, and 12 are located in the medulla and have localizing value for lesions in this most caudal part of the brainstem. Cranial nerves 9 and 10 These two nerves are clinically lumped together. Motor wise, they innervate pharyngeal and laryngeal muscles. Their sensory component is sensation for the pharynx and taste for the posterior one-third of the tongue. Cranial Nerve 11 This nerve is a motor nerve for the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. The UMN control for the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) is an exception to the rule of the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere controls the movement of the contralateral side of the body. Because of the crossing then recrossing of the corticobulbar tracts at the high cervical level, the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere controls the ipsilateral SCM muscle. This makes sense as far as coordinating head movement with body movement if you think about it (remember that the SCM turns the head to the opposite side). So if I want to work with the left side of my body I would want to turn my head to the left so the right SCM would be activated. Cranial Nerve 12 The last of the cranial nerves, CN 12 supplies motor innervation for the tongue. Traps A 6th nerve palsy may be a "false localizing sign". The reason for this is that it has the longest intracranial route of the cranial nerves, therefore it is the most susceptible to pressure that can occur with any cause of increased intracranial pressure.  
Neurologic Exam
over 6 years ago