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Cranial Nerve Examination - OSCE Guide

The ability to carry out a thorough and slick cranial nerve examination is something every medic needs to master. This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the OSCE and you can then customise the examination to suit your own personal style. We spend a lot of time and effort both filming and editing these videos, so we hope you find them useful! This video is part of a series of OSCE video guides which can be found at www.geekymedics.com or alternatively at http://www.youtube.com/user/geekymedics123 Remember that what these exams involve and how they are carried out differs between medical schools, so always follow your local guidance.  
Lewis Potter
about 7 years ago
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22
2510

Gross Anatomy - Drawing the Lumbosacral Plexus

While there are several videos about drawing the brachial plexus, the lumbosacral plexus gets no love. Hopefully this makes it slightly easier to draw and recognise...  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
Img0
21
697

Acute Abdominal Pain in Children

This tutorial covers the key facts in a child presenting with acute abdominal pain.  
Mr Raymond Buick
over 10 years ago
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21
6492

Anatomy - Brain (Circle of Willis and Stroke)

http://armandoh.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan ...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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20
642

Overview of Cranial Nerve Examinations

Guide for beginning a cranial exam by the clinical skills tutors at the University of Liverpool  
Mary
almost 7 years ago
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20
437

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interpreting lumbar puncture

A short presentation on the anatomy of CSF circulation and lumbar puncture interpretation.  
Phil Byass
almost 7 years ago
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20
671

Psychiatry Presentation

This is a powerpoint presentation I created on Psychiatry recently. All information is taken from NICE guidelines and MIMs guides. If any information is incorrect let me know! Pictures are from google. This was a bit of a slog to make truth be told and it is a LONG presentation, but I feel most of the information that is relevant to sitting final written exams is in there. I hope it helps!  
Conrad Hayes
over 6 years ago
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20
417

Diabetic Foot Examination - OSCE Guide

The ability to carry out a thorough and slick diabetic foot examination is something every medic needs to master. This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the OSCE and you can then customise the examination to suit your own personal style. Make sure to head over to http://geekymedics.com/2010/10/10/diabetic-foot-examination/ to see the written guide alongside the video. Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics You should always adhere to your medical schools / local hospital trusts guidelines when performing examinations or clinical procedures.  
OSCE Videos
over 5 years ago
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18
780

Back Pain

A short presentation looking at the epidemiology, pathology and treatment of back pain.  
James Harper
almost 11 years ago
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18
2152

Cerebellum Anatomy and Physiology

Clinical anatomy and physiology or cerebellum  
slideshare.net
almost 4 years ago
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18
1693

Quick Neurological Screening Examination

A demonstration of a CNS screening examination.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
5dd63712a701fb5579ebaf1e8de64d1cf8e36e10042528707704908686
18
3350

Adrenal Disorders Tutorial

Adrenal disorders by Dr Stephen Winters. In this lecture he will talk about disorders like adrenal insufficiency and Cushing disease.  
youtu.be
over 3 years ago
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17
929

Brain Anatomy Overview - Lobes, Diencephalon, Brain Stem & Limbic System

Four Major Lober Diencephalon - Homeostasis Brain stem - Relay Station Limic System - Memory and Emotion Image: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8Ss3-wJfHrpejFtSkdLWHlNdWs Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
4aaf19634eca65b7ebe32540d65de44e54a0414710018954957056114
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Recognising and treating fibromyalgia

In this podcast Anisur Rahman, professor of rheumatology at University College London, joins us to discuss diagnosis and management of the condition.  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1dytm0m?1444773998
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216

Brain: Friend or Foe?

 
Lucas Brammar
over 6 years ago
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17
902

How to Approach Chest Pain

Ahmed Zaafran MD presents clinical aspects of the chest pain including how to approach the chief complaint of chest pain.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
A7f360866572ba4e7b239633282a10022888300d547029324980259
16
3316

An Introduction to Endocrinology

William Peterson and Tom McFadden introduce the field of endocrinology. They explore at the contextual basis of the endocrine system, peptide vs. steroid hormones, the processes by which the brain controls hormones, and hormonal influence on the brain.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
Preview
16
668

An Introduction to Pain [Nociceptors]

Hand drawn tutorial on Nociceptors.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 w5wmg1?1444774074
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720

Exam Survival Guide

1. Sleep (I realize I’m posting this at 12:30 am…) (http://www.helpguide.org/life/sleep_tips.htm) I know there’s a popular perception of sleep deprivation going hand in hand with working hard or succeeding academically. However, that is only true if you’re working very last minute, and don’t care about retaining the information–you basically just want to get through your upcoming test/assignment. I would like to clarify that, although learning about 10 months of material in 2 weeks is overwhelming, it is NOT last minute because whatever you’re working on right now, you’ll have to remember in 2 weeks for your exam. Besides the exam, if you’re studying medicine, you need to remember most of these things for the rest of your life. In order to retain that information, you need to stay alert, well rested and motivated. Prolonged sleep deprivation can make you feel very ‘CBA’ very fast. 2. Stay Energized Sleep is only one factor in staying motivated and alert; another is staying energized¬–in a healthy way. Simply put: if you feel well, you’ll work well. Eat well: difficult, I know, when you’ve got so little time to spare; but as much as you can, try to eat more whole foods (aka things that don’t come in wrappers or have their own commercial) and keep a balanced diet (too much of anything is usually not good). Everyone snacks while they’re doing exams, but try to find a vice that won’t put you in a sugar coma (some good examples include berries and other fruits, nuts, carrots with hummus to dip in, granola bars, etc). Note: drinking tea is also an excellent way to stay energized! Stay active: Again, I know something like this is difficult to keep up in normal everyday life, let alone during exam stress. Even if it is just for 15-20 minutes, some cardio (note: the more strenuous the workout in a short period of time, the more benefit you’ll get) is a fantastic ‘eye-opener’ (I learned that phrase while learning how to take an alcohol history and now I really like it)! No one wants to go for a run in the morning, but after you get past the first 2-3 minutes of wanting to collapse, your body starts to feel really grateful. This is the BEST way to stimulate your senses and wake yourself up. I promise it’s better than any energy drink or cup of coffee you could have. Take small breaks: SMALL breaks!!! About 10 minutes. Every once in a while, you need to get up and walk around to give yourself a break, have some fresh air, grab a snack, but try not to get carried away; try to avoid having a short attention span. 3. Make Lists I cannot stress enough how counterproductive it is to overwhelm yourself with the amount of work you have. Whether you think about it or not, that pile is not going anywhere. Thinking about it won’t wish it away. Stop psyching yourself out and just get on with it– step by step. Making a list of objectives you need to accomplish that day or week is a great way to start; then, cross them out as you go along (such a satisfying feeling). Being able to visualize your progress will be a great motivator. Remember: it is important to be systematic with your studying approach; if you jump around between modules because they’re boring you’re just going to confuse yourself and make it hard to remember things when that exam comes Note: I have a white board in my room where I write my objectives for the week. Some days it motivates, some days it I want to throw it out the window (but I can't reach the latch)… 4. Practice Questions Practice questions are excellent for monitoring your progress; they’re also excellent at scaring you. Do not fear! This is a good thing, because now you know what you’re missing, go back and read up on what you forgot to take a look at, and come back and do the questions later. Then give yourself a sticker for getting it right ? Practice questions are also great for last minute studying too because they can help you do what I call “backwards studying”–which is what I just described: figuring out what you need to learn based on what the questions look like. 5. Be realistic Set realistic goals for yourself; most importantly, set realistic daily goals for yourself so that when you get all or most or even some of them done you can go to sleep with a level of satisfaction. Also, you need to pick your battles. Example: if you suck at neuro, then one module’s loss is another’s gain. Don’t spend too much time trying to get through one thing, just keep moving forward, and come back to it later 6. ‘Do not disturb’ Facebook, twitter, instagram, youtube, whatsapp, texting, pinterest, meme websites, so many fantastic ways to kill your time… Do yourself a favor, save them for your breaks. If someone is dying or on fire, they will most likely call you, not text you or write on your wall; you do not need to check your phone that often unless you're expecting something time sensitive. 7.Don’t Compare Everyone studying in your program is going to be stressed about things; do NOT let it rub off on you. You know those moments when you hear a peer or a prof/tutor describing something you have never even heard of, then you start panicking? Yeah, don’t do that. It happens to everyone. Instead of worrying so much, just go read about it! Simple solution right? What else are you going to do? Plus, a lot of the time other students seem to know more than they need to about certain things (which I can tell you right now, doesn’t always mean they’re doing better than you; knowing random, very specific factoids doesn’t mean they can bring it in clinic. Everyone can pull a Hermione and know a book inside out, but this is not necessarily the hallmark of a good doctor), what’s it to you? Worry about yourself, be confident in your abilities, and don’t trouble yourself with comparing to other people 8.Practice for Practicals Everyone is afraid of practical exams, like the OSCE (at any rest station you're likely to find me with my head in my hands trying to stabilize my breathing pattern and trying not to cry). The best way to be ready is to practice and practice and practice and practice. It’s like learning to drive a car. At first you’re too aware of your foot on the gas, the position of your hand on the wheel, etc; but, after driving for a little while, these things become subconscious. In the same way, when you walk into a station, you could be so worried about how you’ll do your introduction and gain consent, and remembering to wash your hands, and getting equipment and and and and and; the anxiety affects your confidence and your competence. If you practice enough, then no matter what they throw at you, you will get most of the points because the process will be second nature to you. Practice on your roommates, friends, family members, patients with a doctor's help...when appropriate... Even your stuffed animals if you're really desperate. DO NOT leave practicing for these practicals to the last minute; and if you do, make sure you go through every thing over and over again until you’re explaining examinations in your sleep. NOTE: When I'm practicing for OSCE alone, I record myself over and over again and play it back to myself and criticize it, and then practice againn. 9.Consistency You don’t necessarily have to study in the same place every day; however, it is always good to have some level of routine. Some examples include: waking up/sleeping at the same time everyday, going for a run at the same time every day, having the same study routine, etc. Repetition is a good way to keep your brain focused on new activities because, like I said before, the more you repeat things, the more they become second nature to you. Hope these tips are of some use to you; if not, feel free to sound off in the comments some alternate ways to get through exams. Remember that while exams are stressful, this is the time where you build your character and find out what you’re truly capable of. When you drop your pen after that final exam, you want to feel satisfied and relieved, not regretful. Happy Studying ?  
Mary
over 6 years ago