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NoninvasiveVentilation

Category

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9

Weaning (Liberating) from the mechanical ventilator

<p>Don't wean people from their ventilators-- liberate them!!&nbsp; When are people ready to come off the ventilator?&nbsp; What are weaning parameters?&nbsp; How does one do a spontaneous weaning trial?&nbsp;&nbsp; What is the role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV)?</p>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
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Does non-invasive ventilation worsen or improve patients with concurrent heart failure?

I have heard that non-invasive ventilation can worsen heart failure. However I have also heard it can improve those with heart failure, I think because it redces the preload on the heart by reducing venous return as there is an increased intrathoracic pressure. Anyone know for certain?  
Semhar Abraha
almost 7 years ago
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144

CPAP and Non-Invasive Ventilation in 5 minutes

CPAP and non-invasive ventilation: a basic introduction to what it is in 5 minutes  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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CPAP and Non-Invasive Ventilation in 5 minutes - YouTube

CPAP and non-invasive ventilation: a basic introduction to what it is in 5 minutes  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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13

Apneic ventilation using pressure-limited ventilation

Introduction 0 Noninvasive ventilation (i.e. BiPAP) is arguably the most powerful approach to optimize oxygenation and ventilation before intubation, given  
pulmcrit.org
over 4 years ago
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1
51

Paediatric Respiratory Medicine

Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, second edition remains the first point of reference for those faced with treating acute or chronic respiratory problems. The handbook discusses the approach to clinical problems, specific conditions, supportive care and practical procedures, and includes vital appendices covering specific tests and statistics. Designed as a practical guide, it serves general and specialist paediatricians at both consultant and trainee level. The book is divided into five parts. Part I provides a practical approach to acute and non-acute clinical problems. Part II provides detailed information about common and more rare clinical conditions. Part III provides useful information on supportive care, including for example, use of non-invasive ventilation and the care of a child with a tracheotomy. Part IV gives details on how to perform several practical procedures, such as ciliary brush biopsy, flexible bronchoscopy, and inserting a chest drain. The appendices provide information on lung function testing and tables of age-corrected normal values for several respiratory parameters. Written by three consultants in paediatric respiratory medicine, their expertise in the subject provides all levels of paediatricians with practical guide on a subject that is increasingly relevant in paediatrics.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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7

Critical Care

Endotracheal intubation is frequently complicated by laryngeal edema, which may present as postextubation stridor or respiratory difficulty or both. Ultimately, postextubation laryngeal edema may result in respiratory failure with subsequent reintubation. Risk factors for postextubation laryngeal edema include female gender, large tube size, and prolonged intubation. Although patients at low risk for postextubation respiratory insufficiency due to laryngeal edema can be identified by the cuff leak test or laryngeal ultrasound, no reliable test for the identification of high-risk patients is currently available. If applied in a timely manner, intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids can prevent postextubation laryngeal edema; however, the inability to identify high-risk patients prevents the targeted pretreatment of these patients. Therefore, the decision to start corticosteroids should be made on an individual basis and on the basis of the outcome of the cuff leak test and additional risk factors. The preferential treatment of postextubation laryngeal edema consists of intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids combined with nebulized epinephrine, although no data on the optimal treatment algorithm are available. In the presence of respiratory failure, reintubation should be performed without delay. Application of noninvasive ventilation or inhalation of a helium/oxygen mixture is not indicated since it does not improve outcome and increases the delay to intubation.  
ccforum.com
almost 4 years ago
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landmark-article-of-the-week

NIPPV for COPD Thanks to Dr. Philippe Louissaint for writing this post and sharing the second weekly landmark article. An oldie but a goodie...   Brochard, L., Mancebo, J., Wysocki, M., Lofaso, F., Conti, G., Rauss, A., … Harf, A. (1995). Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. New England Journal of…  
tjuhem.wordpress.com
almost 4 years ago
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1

Noninvasive Ventilation in the Immune-compromised Patient

This randomized trial examined differences in 28-day mortality in patients with acute respiratory failure treated with noninvasive ventilation or oxygen therapy alone.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Respiratory Failure in Immunocompromised Patients

With uninspiring results using noninvasive ventilation, why not try high-flow oxygen to manage respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients?  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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4

Sedation for Noninvasive Ventilation in Agitated Patients

Learn about the benefits and risks of using sedatives to manage agitation during non-invasive ventilation.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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7

Noninvasive Ventilation Delivered by Helmet Cuts Intubation Rates in ARDS

Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) delivered by helmet reduces endotracheal intubation rates in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), compared with NIV delivered by facemask, according to a new trial.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago