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Will the NMC force occupational health to split from other nurses? - Personnel Today

The clock is ticking for occupational health (OH) practitioners to make their voice heard on the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) plans for three-yearly checks, or “revalidation”, of practitioners’ fitness to continue to practise and its proposals to revise the NMC Code of Conduct. Nic Paton reports.  
personneltoday.com
over 4 years ago
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131

Blessed | Babycatcher Blog

I am setting up this blog to chronicle my adventures of babycatching in Africa. This site is for all of you who have loved, encouraged, and supported me over the past 29 years. This is my evolving story of stepping out into the unknown and meeting life as it first makes its way into the world.  
babycatching.blogspot.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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5
70

Second Stage of Labour: Clinical Skills Tutorial for Student Midwives

This tutorial was made to help prepare you for your second stage clinical skills lab  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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5
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Polydactyl extra thumb

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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148

The controversial Nursing perception of Electro convulsive Therapy: A true Experience from Egypt

This is my true experience with Electro convulsive therapy in Egypt  
Mahmoud Agiza
almost 6 years ago
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4
306

Medical Video Lectures: Anatomy Of Pharyngeal Arches (Branchial Arches) PART 2/2

Uploading ANATOMY Video Lectures. Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us. Understand t...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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4
33

A day in the life of a neonatal nurse advisor

Julia Hodges is a Neonatal Nurse Advisor at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). She lives in Wimbledon and has been working at the hospital since April this  
blog.gosh.org
over 4 years ago
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Introduction of hemopoietic system

Introduction  
Sandeep Maurya
over 4 years ago
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4
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25 Secrets Nurses Will Never Tell You

Just be patient...  
buzzfeed.com
over 4 years ago
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4
38

Arnold Chiari syndrome Saggital MRI

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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4
171

Bedside handoffs by nurses boost patient satisfaction

Nursing experts who have studied the concept of the bedside shift-change handoff, in which the departing nurse and the nurse coming on duty meet to discuss the patient's care with each other and with the patient and the patient's family, say it helps patients feel more a part of the healing process.  
modernhealthcare.com
over 4 years ago
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3
251

Heart Murmurs: Easy Cardiac Auscultation Tutorial: Intro Aortic Stenosis, Regurgitation (3 of 5)

Audio Flashcards to practice cardiac murmur auscultation: http://www.helphippo.com/flash/flashcards.html Cardiac murmurs for nursing and medical students to learn auscultation of abnormal heart sounds for regurgitation and stenosis of aortic, pulmonary, mitral and tricuspid valves. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: More cool stuff coming as we get more Hippo Helpers! Visit: http:// helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year. Cardiac/Respiratory Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR0QD_IsxkMTRA0LxdOcwJN6 Part 1 of our introductory cardiac auscultation series at: http://youtu.be/qd1FhUJ8y7c Playlist to listen to recorded heart sounds (with HelpHippo's mnemonic notes beneath the uploader's description) is at http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4A5E9A37522CB42E Visit: http://helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year.  
HelpHippo.com
about 6 years ago
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3
107

USMLE- PHARM- AMINOGLYCOSIDE ANTIBIOTICS

This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing lectures for students across the globe. Our lectures are oversimpli...  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago
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Dr. Najeeb Lectures - World's Most Popular Medical Lectures

World's Most Popular Medical Lectures on Basic Medical Sciences. Great for Medical, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy Students! Try us for FREE!  
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over 5 years ago
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Mr Tim Smart “Learning to Lead” - Birmingham Medical Leadership Society Lecture 2

Last Wednesday (27/11/13) was Birmingham Medical Leadership Society’s second lecture in its autumn series on why healthcare professionals should become involved in management and leadership. Firstly, a really big thank you to Mr Smart for travelling all the way to Birmingham for free (!) to speak to us. It was a brilliant event and certainly sparked some debate. A second big thank you to Michelle and Angie – the University of Birmingham Alumni and marketing team who helped organise this event and recorded it – a video will hopefully be available online soon. Mr Tim Smart is the CEO of King’s NHS Foundation Trust and has been for the last few years – a period in which King’s has had some of the most successive hospital statistics in the UK. Is there a secret to managing such a successful hospital? “It’s a people business. Patients are what we are here for and we must never forget that” Mr Smart doesn’t enjoy giving lectures, so instead he had an “intimate chat” covering his personal philosophy of why we as medical students and junior doctors should consider a career in management at some point. Good managers should be people persons. Doctors are selected for being good at talking to and listening to people – these are directly translatable skills. Good managers should be team leaders. Medicine is becoming more and more a team occupation, we are all trained to work, think and act as a team and especially doctors are expected to know how to lead this team. Again, a directly transferable skill. Good managers need to know how to make decisions based on incomplete knowledge and basic statistics. Doctors make life-altering clinical decisions every day based statistics and incomplete knowledge. A very important directly transferable skill. Good managers get out of their offices, meet the staff and walk around their empires. Doctors, whether surgeons, GP’s or radiologists have to walk around the hospitals on their routine business and have to deal with a huge variety of staff from every level. To be a great doctor you need to know how to get the best out of the staff around you, to get the tasks done that your patients’ need. Directly transferable skills. Good managers are quick on the up-take and are always looking for new ways to improve their departments. Doctors have to stay on top of the literature and are committed to a life-time of learning new and complex topics. Directly transferable. Good managers are honest and put in place systems that try to prevent bad situations occurring again. Good doctors are honest and own up when they make a mistake, they then try to ensure that that mistake isn’t made again. Directly Transferable. Even good managers sometimes have difficulties getting doctors to do what they want – because the managers are not doctors. Doctors that become managers still have the professional reputation of a doctor. A very transferable asset that can be used to encourage their colleagues to do what should be done. A good manager values their staff – especially the nurses. A good doctor knows just how important the nurses, ODP, physio’s and other healthcare professionals and hospital staff are. This is one of the best reasons why doctors should get involved with management. We understand the front line. We know the troops. We know the problems. We are more than capable of thinking of some of the solutions! “Project management isn’t magic” “Everything done within a hospital should be to benefit patients – therefore everything in the hospital should be answerable to patients, including the hospital shop!” “Reward excellence, otherwise you get mediocrity” At the present The University of Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society is in contact with the FMLM and other similar groups at the Universities of Bristol, Barts and Oxford. We are looking to get in contact with every other society in the country. If you are a new or old MLS then please do get in touch, we would love to hear from you and are happy to help your societies in any way we can – we would also love to attend your events so please do send us an invite. Email us at med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @UoBMedLeaders Find us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Come along to our up coming events… Thursday 5th December LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Why should doctors get involved in management’ By Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of BHH NHS Trust Wednesday 22nd January 2014 LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Has the NHS lost the ability to care?’ – responding to the Mid Staffs inquiry’ By Prof Jon Glasby, Director of the Health Services Management Centre , UoB Thursday 20th February LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Creating a Major Trauma Unit at the UHB Trust’ By Sir Prof Keith Porter, Professor of Traumatology, UHB Saturday 8th March LT3 Medical School, 1pm ‘Applying the Theory of Constraints to Healthcare By Mr A Dinham and J Nieboer ,QFI Consulting  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
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Going to work in a different country? Different culture? Different language? Avoid getting tripped up as I did!

I grew up in Belgium and went to medical school in Louvain, Belgium. I came to the USA for my internship and selected a small hospital in upstate New York. What an initial culture shock that was! The first problem was the language. I knew enough "school" English to get by, or so I thought. Talking on the phone was the hardest. Initially, the nurses in the hospital thought that I was the most conscientious intern they had ever worked with. When I was on duty and the nurses called me on the phone at night, I would always go to the ward, look over the chart, see the patient and then write a note and orders, rather than just handle things over the phone like all the other interns did when called for rather minor matters. Little did the nurses realize that the reason I would get up in the middle of the night and physically go to the ward was due to the fact that I had no idea what they were talking about. I did not understand a word of what the nurses were telling or asking me on the telephone, especially not when they were using even common American abbreviations, like PRN, QID, LMP etc. [PRN (Latin) means as needed; QID (Latin) means four times a day and LMP means last menstrual period]. That problem rapidly resolved as I began to understand more and more of the English medical terms. However, there is a major difference between understanding day-to-day common English and grasping all the idioms and sayings. A rather amusing anecdote will illustrate that. About two months into my internship, I was on call at night when one of the nurses telephoned me in the early evening. A patient (Mrs X) was having a bad headache and wanted something for it. I was proud that I had understood the problem over the phone and was even more proud that I managed to order something for her headache without having to walk over to the ward. An hour or so later, the same nurse called me for the same patient because she had been constipated and wanted something for it. Again I understood and again I was able to prescribe a laxative over the phone without having to go to see the patient. A while later the same nurse called to let me know that Mrs X was agitated and wanted something for sleep. I understood again and prescribed a sleeping pill. Close to the 11pm shift change the same nurse called me once more: "Dr. LeMaire, I am so sorry to keep bothering you about Mrs X, but she is really a pain in the neck…" Immediately some horrible thought occurred to me. Here is a patient who has a bad headache, is constipated and agitated and now has a pain in her neck. These could all be symptoms of meningitis and here I have been ordering medications over the phone for a potentially serious condition. I broke out in a cold sweat and I told the nurse "I am coming." I ran over to the ward where that patient was hospitalized, went to her room and after introducing myself said "Mrs. X, the nurse tells me that you have a pain in your neck." The rest is history. The patient lodged a complaint about the nurse and me, but we both got off with a minor reprimand and in fact somewhat of a chuckle by the administrator handling the complaint. Such tripping up by the idioms and sayings can of course happen in any language. Be aware! Dr. William LeMaire  
DR William LeMaire
almost 5 years ago
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25 Truths All Nurses Know

We have the BIGGEST bladders in the world… Check out more awesome BuzzFeedYellow videos! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedyellow MUSIC Old School Cool Licensed via Wa...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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4 Ways To Improve Intensive Care

Hi, and welcome to my blog! I'm Susan E. Mazer -- a knowledge expert and thought leader on how the environment of care impacts the patient experience. Topics I write about include safety, satisfaction, hospital noise, nursing, care at the bedside, and much more. Subscribe below to get email notices so you won't miss any great content.  
healinghealth.com
about 4 years ago