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Language checks for nurses proposed - BBC News

Nurses, pharmacists, dentists and midwives could face language skills checks to make sure they are fluent in English, under plans being put out to consultation.  
BBC News
about 7 years ago
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Midwife abortion objection case heard at Supreme Court - BBC News

The UK's highest court will hear legal argument on whether midwives have a right to refuse to take any part in abortion procedures on moral grounds.  
BBC News
about 7 years ago
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FSRH Nurses Conference: Sue Capstick on the impact nurses can have on managing services

Stream FSRH Nurses Conference: Sue Capstick on the impact nurses can have on managing services by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 7 years ago
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FSRH Nurses Conference: Marg Bannerman on recommendations for SRH education

Stream FSRH Nurses Conference: Marg Bannerman on recommendations for SRH education by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 7 years ago
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FSRH Nurses Conference: Chris Wilkinson on having nurses as members of the faculty

Stream FSRH Nurses Conference: Chris Wilkinson on having nurses as members of the faculty by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 7 years ago
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FSRH Nurses Conference: Anne Connolly on the diploma and its influence on general practice

Stream FSRH Nurses Conference: Anne Connolly on the diploma and its influence on general practice by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 7 years ago
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FSRH Nurses conference: Wendy Moore on the nurses diploma

Stream FSRH Nurses conference: Wendy Moore on the nurses diploma by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 7 years ago
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Tutors don masks to boost nurse training - BBC News

Nursing tutors at the University of Surrey are planning to make themselves unrecognisable in a bid to boost students' bedside skills.  
BBC News
almost 7 years ago
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The Big Push: Call the Midwife in Bangladesh - BBC News

Taking inspiration from UK drama Call the Midwife, a new TV series is trying to break the taboo of childbirth in Bangladesh.  
BBC News
almost 7 years ago
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Patent Ductus Arteriosus

This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing lectures for students across the globe. Our lectures are oversimpli...  
YouTube
almost 7 years ago
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1
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Physician Assistants: Top Secrets to How to PASS the PANCE exam

www.CRUSHPANCE.COM to watch hundreds of medical videos lectures. This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing le...  
YouTube
almost 7 years ago
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Textbook of Basic Nursing

Now in its Ninth Edition, this comprehensive all-in-one textbook covers the basic LPN/LVN curriculum and all content areas of the NCLEX-PN®. Coverage includes anatomy and physiology, nursing process, growth and development, nursing skills, and pharmacology, as well as medical-surgical, maternal-neonatal, pediatric, and psychiatric-mental health nursing. The book is written in a student-friendly style and has an attractive full-color design, with numerous illustrations, tables, and boxes. Bound-in multimedia CD-ROMs include audio pronunciations, clinical simulations, videos, animations, and a simulated NCLEX-PN® exam. This edition's comprehensive ancillary package includes curriculum materials, PowerPoint slides, lesson plans, and a test generator of NCLEX-PN®-style questions.  
Google Books
almost 7 years ago
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Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Canadian Medical-surgical Nursing

This is the Second Edition of the popular Canadian adaptation of Brunner and Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing, by Day, Paul, and Williams. Woven throughout the content is new and updated material that reflects key practice differences in Canada, ranging from the healthcare system, to cultural considerations, epidemiology, pharmacology, Web resources, and more. Compatibility: BlackBerry(R) OS 4.1 or Higher / iPhone/iPod Touch 2.0 or Higher /Palm OS 3.5 or higher / Palm Pre Classic / Symbian S60, 3rd edition (Nokia) / Windows Mobile(TM) Pocket PC (all versions) / Windows Mobile Smartphone / Windows 98SE/2000/ME/XP/Vista/Tablet PC  
Google Books
almost 7 years ago
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Call the Midwife: I advise the BBC drama on midwifery

Terri Coates explains why it’s difficult to show the reality of birth of screen, and why she gets a hard time from admissions tutors on midwifery courses  
the Guardian
over 6 years ago
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Male Catheterisation OSCE Guide

There are generally two approaches to catheterisation, the two gloved technique and the clean hand / dirty hand technique. Please use the method taught at your medical school, this guide demonstrates the clean hand / dirty hand method.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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333

Medical Video Lectures: Anatomy Of Pharyngeal Arches (Branchial Arches) PART 1/2

Uploading ANATOMY Video lectures.Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us. Understand th...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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Medical Video Lectures: Anatomy Of Pharyngeal Arches (Branchial Arches) PART 2/2

Uploading ANATOMY Video Lectures. Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us. Understand t...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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A Humble NHS?

A Recap Last week in my personal blog I reflected on humility as defined by James Ryle: God given self-assurance that eliminates the need to prove to others the worth of who you are and the rightness of what you do. Ryle suggests, from 1 Peter 5:5-7, that central to humbling ourselves is throwing our cares on to God. Every concern, care and fear being hurled on to God who is faithful and powerful enough to handle them. When we know that we are loved by Him no matter what and that He is in control no matter what, then we remove the need to prove ourselves or protect ourselves. We become humble – secure enough to allow God to be in control and to serve others. Once our eyes are lifted from ourselves we are able to see others to love and serve them. Stafford Hospital Just before writing the last post I was reading an article about the report by Robert Francis QC on the appalling treatment of patients at Stafford Hospital. One of the recurring comments made by many different people is that the pressure of targets and incentives increasingly displaces focus on compassion and patient care. When doctors, nurses and managers alike are bombarded with ever increasing and regularly changes hoops to jump through and targets to meet, no wonder their attention and efforts are dragged from patient care. I’ve seen something of the effects of this in a family member who for many years worked as a Health Visitor. In their decades of service they saw an ever increasing and ever changing string of targets and goals alongside cost cutting moves that stripped resources and personnel. Their desire to be compassionate and offer the best care possible became more and more stressful until it finally proved too much. She recently changed jobs. Now I’m not trying to attack the NHS and I am well aware that so many people receive great care. But this is not a new concern that is being bandied around with fresh vigour in the light of Stafford Hospital. What struck me is that it demonstrates on an institutional level what also seems true at a personal level. Namely, that when we are forced to operate from a place of insecurity we begin to miss the most important things. NHS services have to meet targets to receive funding to simply keep operating – there will be no patient care if there is no hospital. Oftentimes, especially as a leader, we can live with a sense that, unless we meet expectations or make people like us or recognise our worth, then we’ll have no influence to do any of the things we know we are called to do. The secret of personal humility is to recognise that we are already loved by our Father before we even move our finger; to recognise that He is control and we can throw every care on Him. A person who can live from that place of security finds, free from the need to prove themselves or their actions, can begin to simply do what they are made and called to do. They are no longer pulled in different directions by a multiplicity of cares. What about an institution? It strikes me that a similar solution is needed for the NHS. Is there a way to give security for doctors, nurses and caring professionals so that they are able to do what they are called to do without constantly watching their back? Obviously there is a need for accountability for the safety of patients and to ensure a good standard of care, but the constant need to prove worth and achievement cannot be helpful for those who are called to compassionate care. I’m not a healthcare professional. I don’t know exactly what this would look like. But I recognise in the diagnosis of struggles in the NHS, God’s diagnosis of struggles in many people’s lives. The way He designed us to live with Him is often a good basis to begin to imagine a new way for every level of society to function. So, my question is this: what would a humble NHS look like? To whom could a National Health Service throw it’s concerns and cares?  
Rev Samuel Pollard
almost 9 years ago
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279

Worst Medical Experience Ever

Worst experience ever? - this is pretty difficult as I've worked in some of the poorest countries in the world and seen some things that should never happen like children dying of dehydration and malaria. But this recent experience was definitely the worst. It was midnight and I was trying to get my 16 month old to sleep having woken up after vomiting in his cot. Despite paracetamol, ibuprofen, stripping to nappy, damp sponging and having the window open he went rigid and started fitting. It only lasted a minute or two yet felt like an eternity as he was unable to breathe and became progressively blue as my mind raced ahead to brain damage or some other horrible sequalae. The fitting stopped and my mind turned to whether I was going to have to start CPR. I lay him on the floor and put my ear to his chest and was glad to hear a strong heartbeat but he was floppy with a compromised airway so I quickly got him in the recovery position. The ambulance arrived in 8 minutes and after some oxygen and some observations he was strapped in and ready to go. He had been unconscious for about 15 minutes but was starting to come round, much to my relief. The ambulance crew were great and their quick response made all the difference but then they took nearly half an hour to get to A&E in the middle of the night because they took the most awkward route imaginable. I don't know if it was a deliberate delaying tactic or just a lack of local knowledge but even without a blue light I could have done it in half the time! Why do ambulances not have GPS - ideally with local traffic info built in? We arrived in A&E and were ushered to a miserable receptionist who took our details and told us to have a seat. I noticed above her head that the wait time was 3.5 hours, though we did see a junior nurse who took his observations again. Not long after the screen changed to a 5 hour wait and a bit later to a 6 hour wait! I am glad to say that by about 3 hours my little man was back to his usual self (as evidenced by his attempts at destroying the department) and so after getting the nurse to repeat his obs (all normal) we decided to take him home, knowing we had a few more hours to wait for the doctor, and that the doctor was now unlikely to do anything as he was now well. I tell the story in such detail in part for catharsis, in part to share my brief insight into being on the other side of the consultation, but also because it illustrated a number of system failures. It was a horrible experience but made a lot worse by those system failures. And I couldn't help but feel even more sorry for those around me who didn't have the medical experience that I had to contextualise it all. Sickness, in ourselves or our loved ones, is bad enough without the system making it worse. I had 3 hours of walking around the department with my son in my arms which gave me plenty of time to observe what was going on around me and consider whether it could be improved. I did of course not have access to all areas and so couldn't see what was happening behind the scenes so things may have been busier than I was aware of. Also it was only one evening so not necessarily representative. There were about 15 children in the department and for the 3 hours we were there only a handful of new patients that arrived so no obvious reason for the increasing delay. As I walked around it was clear to me that at least half of the children didn't need to be there. Some were fast asleep on the benches, arguably suggesting they didn't need emergency treatment. One lad had a minor head injury that just needed a clean and some advice. Whilst I didn't ask anyone what was wrong with people talk and so you hear what some of the problems were. Some were definately far more appropriate for general practice. So how could things have been improved and could technology have helped as well? One thing that struck me is that the 'triage' nurse would have been much better as a senior doctor. Not necessarily a consultant but certainly someone with the experience to make decisions. Had this been the case I think a good number could have been sent home very quickly, maybe with some basic treatment or maybe just with advice. Even if it was more complex it may have been that an urgent outpatient in a few days time would have been a much more satisfactory way of dealing with the problem. Even in our case where immediate discharge wouldn't have been appropriate a senior doctor could have made a quick assessment and said "let's observe him for a couple of hours and then repeat is obs - if he is well, the obs are normal and you are happy then you can go home". This would have made the world of difference to us. So where does the technology come in? I've already mentioned Sat Nav for the ambulance but there are a number of other points where technology could have played a part in improving patient experience. Starting with the ambulance if they had access to real time data on hospital A&E waiting times they may have been able to divert us to a hospital with a much shorter time. This is even more important for adult hospitals were the turnover of patients is much higher. Such information could help staff and patients make more informed decisions. The ambulance took us to hospital which was probably appropriate for us but not for everyone. Unfortunately many of the other services like GP out of hours are not always prepared to accept such patients and again the ambulance crews need to know where is available and what access and waiting times they have. Walk-in patients are often also totally inappropriate and an easy method of redirection would be beneficial for all concerned. But this requires change and may even require such radical ideas as paying for transport to take patients to alternative locations if they are more appropraite. The reasons patient's choose A&E when other services would be far more appropriate are many and complex. It can be about transport and convenience and past experiences and many other things. It is likely that at least some of it is that patients often struggle to get an appointment to see their own GP within a reasonable time frame or just that their impression is that it will be difficult to get an appointment so they don't even try. But imagine a system where the waiting times for appointments for all GPs and out of hours services were readily available to hospitals, ambulances, NHS direct etc. Even better imagine that authorised people could book appointments directly, even when the practice was closed. How many patients would be happy to avoid a long wait in A&E if they had the reassurance of a GP appointment the next day? And the technology already exists to do some of this and it wouldn't be that hard to adapt current technology to provide this functionality. Yet it still doesn't happen. I have my theories as to why but this is enough for one post. In case you were wondering my son appears to have made a full recovery with no obvious ongoing problems. I think I have recovered and then he makes the same breathing noises he made just before the fit and I am transported back to that fateful night. I think it will take time for the feelings to fade.  
Dr Damian Williams
over 8 years ago