New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview 300x388
2
47

INFLUENCE OF DIETARY FACTOR IN STUDENT PERFORMANCE

Introduction Nutrition during adolescence is of great importance in the quality of life and in school performance. In our society, eating habits are changing due to socio-cultural and family factors, new ideas about self-image and a global food culture. Data published in the National Health Survey (ENSANUT 2006), suggest that excess weight in adolescents between 12 and 19 years, has a national average of 31.9% in Mexico. One in 3 teens have excessive weight in our country. Several studies suggest that foods high in energy density and large portions of food, increase energy consumption and hence weight gain. Bottled soft drinks currently consumed, contribute to the epidemic of obesity and type II diabetes in Mexico. The intake of energy from these drink, represent 21% of the total energy consumption in Mexican adolescents. This, added to the energy from the diet, both contribute to these epidemics. Therefore, the adoption of patterns of consumption of healthy food and drinks for adolescents should be a priority for the population, since a well-balanced diet positively affects the physical and intellectual development of adolescents.  
katy torres
almost 10 years ago
Preview
2
36

Preventing Overweight & Obesity in Scotland

Scottish Government Obesity Strategy February 2010 Overweight and obesity cannot be tackled by just relying on individuals to change their behaviour as the factors that contribute to gaining weight have been interwoven into the very fabric of our lifestyles to such an extent that weight gain is almost inevitable in today’s society. The evidence also suggests that the provision of health information, although important, is not sufficient and that to make the changes necessary we have to reshape our living environment from one that promotes weight gain to one that supports healthy choices.  
Chris Oliver
over 9 years ago
Preview
8
158

Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity

Metabolic syndrome and obesity are attaining epidemic proportions worldwide. This PPT shows the link between the two, their aetiology, the pathophysiology and what simple measures could be used in managing the conditions.  
piyusha atapattu
almost 7 years ago
Preview
2
32

Obesity: How worried should we be? - BBC News

The obesity crisis may be worse than originally feared, according to campaigners. Are they right, asks Nick Triggle?  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
23

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Epidemiology and Aetiology More common in women Typical presentation at age 30-50 Associated with gout, pregnancy, the pill, premenstrual state, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, acromegaly, obesity, amyloidosis Some believe that jobs that involve repetitive flexing of the wrist may be involved.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
40

Causes of Hepatomegaly

Causes of hepatomegalyMassive = CRAM Cancer - primary and secondary Right heart failure Alcoholic liver disease with fatty infiltration Myeloproliferative diseases (ie Chronic myeloid laekaemia, PRubraVera,Essential Throbocythaemia) Moderate = FAILL  all of the above plus Fatty liver - from DM, obesity Amyloidosis  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
48

Dystocia

This means difficulty during labour. It occurs in about 1% of deliveries. Breech presentation can cause dystocia.   Aetiology Diabetes mellitus Fetal macrosomia -  - often caused by maternal diabetes Maternal obesity  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
94

Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD)

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is due to atherosclerosis of arteries in the limbs. The level of arterial occlusion present is proportional to the symptoms. The pathogenesis and risk factors are the same as for coronary artery disease (CAD), and include: Hypertension Dyslipidaemia High LDL and low LDL levels Diabetes Obesity FH of arterial disease Smoking Age Male gender   Epidemiology  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
34

What is the most effective operation for adults with severe and complex obesity?

Accessing, undergoing, and achieving a successful outcome from surgery for “severe and complex obesity” is difficult and requires determination and effort. Here, we consider “severe and complex obesity” to mean that an individual’s health is compromised by his or her weight to the extent that surgery can be considered to be an appropriate option.1 Surgery may be offered to adults with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥40, or a BMI of ≥35 with an obesity related disease, and it can be very successful. An average 50% of excess weight may be lost in the first few years after surgery, and if this is sustained it is associated with long term reduction in overall mortality and decreased incidences of diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer.1 2 This treatment, however, requires careful consideration and serious commitment, with the need to demonstrate full engagement in a structured weight loss programme, to have tried all appropriate non-invasive measures of weight loss, and persevered for referral to a specialist surgical team.1 Once surgery is approved it is necessary to choose which operation to undergo.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

Obesity, genetic risk, and environment

The alarming global rise in prevalence of obesity is caused by unhealthy obesogenic environments. In westernised societies we are all exposed to calorie dense food, sedentary lives, stress, and sleep deficit. Some people seem relatively insensitive to these environmental pressures, while others are severely affected and become obese.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
28

What is the most effective operation for adults with severe and complex obesity?

Accessing, undergoing, and achieving a successful outcome from surgery for “severe and complex obesity” is difficult and requires determination and effort. Here, we consider “severe and complex obesity” to mean that an individual’s health is compromised by his or her weight to the extent that surgery can be considered to be an appropriate option.1 Surgery may be offered to adults with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥40, or a BMI of ≥35 with an obesity related disease, and it can be very successful. An average 50% of excess weight may be lost in the first few years after surgery, and if this is sustained it is associated with long term reduction in overall mortality and decreased incidences of diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer.1 2 This treatment, however, requires careful consideration and serious commitment, with the need to demonstrate full engagement in a structured weight loss programme, to have tried all appropriate non-invasive measures of weight loss, and persevered for referral to a specialist surgical team.1 Once surgery is approved it is necessary to choose which operation to undergo.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

The impact of a bodyweight and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) initiated through a national colorectal cancer screening programme: randomised controlled trial

Objective To evaluate the impact of a diet and physical activity intervention (BeWEL) on weight change in people with a body mass index >25 weight (kg)/height (m)2 at increased risk of colorectal cancer and other obesity related comorbidities.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
30

Obesity, genetic risk, and environment

The alarming global rise in prevalence of obesity is caused by unhealthy obesogenic environments. In westernised societies we are all exposed to calorie dense food, sedentary lives, stress, and sleep deficit. Some people seem relatively insensitive to these environmental pressures, while others are severely affected and become obese.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
17

Curry cure | Mo Costandi

Mo Costandi: Understanding why mint tastes cool and chilli is hot could lead to new treatments for chronic pain, obesity and even cancer  
the Guardian
over 5 years ago
13
1
18

WHO | WHO opens public consultation on draft sugars guideline

WHO is launching a public consultation on its draft guideline on sugars intake. When finalized, the guideline will provide countries with recommendations on limiting the consumption of sugars to reduce public health problems like obesity and dental caries (commonly referred to as tooth decay).  
who.int
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
14

Recent advances in clinical practice challenges and opportunities in the management of obesity

Stream Recent advances in clinical practice challenges and opportunities in the management of obesity by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
24

Lack of exercise outweighs obesity among heart disease risk factors, says Australian study

Lack of exercise affects a woman’s risk of developing heart disease more than other known risk factors, including being overweight, new research has shown.1  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
12
1
12

WHO | Director-General announces new initiative to end childhood obesity

In her opening address to the Health Assembly, WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan voiced her deep concern about the increase worldwide of childhood obesity, with numbers climbing fastest in developing countries.  
who.int
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
15

Regulate unhealthy food like cigarettes, campaigners urge

The World Health Organization is being urged to introduce a “tobacco style” response to unhealthy food in a bid to curb the global epidemic of obesity.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
19

Recent advances in clinical practice challenges and opportunities in the management of obesity

Stream Recent advances in clinical practice challenges and opportunities in the management of obesity by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago