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Pregnancy Wheel -- Demonstration & Training Video

Pregnancy Wheel demonstration and training video. Good for nurses or other medical personnel in training, clinicians at pregnancy centers or planned parentho...  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
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Renal Function Tests Useful in Gauging Preeclampsia Risk

Early pregnancy elevations in urine protein-to-creatinine ratios and serum creatinine may be useful markers for preeclampsia risk.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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9

Why I wrote about my wife's miscarriage - BBC News

A husband's online account about the heartbreak involved with starting a family has struck a chord with many couples.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago
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12

UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

Pick a category... Airway Management Cardiology Critical Care Critical Care Literature Update Dermatology Endocrine ENT Financial & Investing Gastrointestional Geriatrics Hematology/Oncology Infectious Disease International EM Med-Legal Medical Education Misc Neurology Obstetrics & Gynecology Ophthamology Orthopedics Pediatrics Pharmacology & Therapeutics Procedures Pulmonary Toxicology Trauma Urology Vascular Visual Diagnosis $('#pearl_categories').change(function(){ window.location = "/educational_pearls/search/?category=" + $(this).val() });  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

Pick a category... Airway Management Cardiology Critical Care Critical Care Literature Update Dermatology Endocrine ENT Financial & Investing Gastrointestional Geriatrics Hematology/Oncology Infectious Disease International EM Med-Legal Medical Education Misc Neurology Obstetrics & Gynecology Ophthamology Orthopedics Pediatrics Pharmacology & Therapeutics Procedures Pulmonary Toxicology Trauma Urology Vascular Visual Diagnosis $('#pearl_categories').change(function(){ window.location = "/educational_pearls/search/?category=" + $(this).val() });  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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10

Cesarean Section by Maternal Age Group

Does advanced maternal age significantly increase the risk for cesarean section, and is intrapartum cesarean section a higher risk in an older age group of women?  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Low hCG Levels Can Indicate Preeclampsia Risk

Measuring hCG levels in pregnant women helps identify those at risk of preeclampsia due to underlying abnormal thyroid function rather than simply pregnancy-raised thyroid activity.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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6

Johnson and Johnson faces lawsuit over vaginal mesh devices

The US states of California and Washington have filed a suit against the drug and device maker Johnson and Johnson, alleging that the company hid its knowledge about potential adverse effects, some of which were permanent, associated with its vaginal mesh devices used to treat pelvic prolapse and stress incontinence.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Johnson and Johnson faces lawsuit over vaginal mesh devices

The US states of California and Washington have filed a suit against the drug and device maker Johnson and Johnson, alleging that the company hid its knowledge about potential adverse effects, some of which were permanent, associated with its vaginal mesh devices used to treat pelvic prolapse and stress incontinence.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Johnson and Johnson faces lawsuit over vaginal mesh devices

The US states of California and Washington have filed a suit against the drug and device maker Johnson and Johnson, alleging that the company hid its knowledge about potential adverse effects, some of which were permanent, associated with its vaginal mesh devices used to treat pelvic prolapse and stress incontinence.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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SHOULD THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH REMOVE ITS BAN ON ARTIFICIAL METHODS OF FAMILY PLANNING?

This is a question faced by many catholic health care providers throughout the world. The Roman Catholic Church officially opposes any artificial method of family planning. When Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church (Church from here on) in February 2013 as Pope Francis, catholics all over the world were encouraged by the idea that they might see some changes in the teachings of the Church as it relates to many issues pertaining to the “family”. These issues include divorce, remarriage, homosexuality, family planning and a number of other topics. I want to focus in this discussion on the longstanding opposition by the Church to the use of artificial methods of family planning (contraception). This ban on contraception affects catholic medical practitioners on a daily basis and this includes, family doctors, RNs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and any medical care giver involved with counseling clients about methods for planning their families and implementing the chosen methods. As we know, the Church allows only “natural methods” of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods”. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. The hope for a change in this official position of the Church has been fostered by the observation that Pope Francis seemed to be willing to listen and has made a number conciliatory remarks on issues like women’s equality, divorced and remarried couples and homosexuality, while continuing to accept only the natural methods of family planning. Then came the most recent publication by Pope Francis, “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This is a beautifully written document about issues related to the family, in which the Pope makes again conciliatory remarks about a number of issues, but reaffirms the position of the Church in regards to family planning. No artificial methods are condoned. This seems to close the door on this issue, at least for the foreseeable future. What a pity and what a missed opportunity for the Pope to bring the teachings of the Church as it pertains to contraception in line with the thinking and practice of the 21st century. It is well known, and adequate statistics are available to show that worldwide a large percentage of catholics are ignoring the teaching of the church as it pertains to family planning and availing themselves of contraception to plan their families. On a personal note I have spoken to a number of priests and asked them about my practice as a catholic obstetrician and gynecologist of prescribing and implementing artificial contraception for my catholic clients. Some of them have told me to following my conscience and continue what I am doing. That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. In this regard the recent publication from the Wiingaards Institute for Catholic Research might be of interest: http://www.catholicsandcontraception.com William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Why I wrote about my wife's miscarriage - BBC News

A husband's online account about the heartbreak involved with starting a family has struck a chord with many couples.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago
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8

Quick Rupture of Membranes and Miscarriage Tests on Horizon

Potentially practice-changing tests could provide immediate and definitive diagnoses of premature rupture of membranes or miscarriage. The developer is in talks to bring them to market.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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2

Clinical risk factors for pre-eclampsia early pregnancy: problems with systematic review

We read Bartsch and colleagues’ review on clinical risk factors for pre-eclampsia with interest.1 This timely topic is of great clinical interest because it reworks the established institutional guidelines for using maternal characteristics to screen for pre-eclampsia risk in pregnancy. Although we applaud their diligent and meticulous approach, we have some reservations about this study.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Clinical risk factors for pre-eclampsia early pregnancy: problems with systematic review

We read Bartsch and colleagues’ review on clinical risk factors for pre-eclampsia with interest.1 This timely topic is of great clinical interest because it reworks the established institutional guidelines for using maternal characteristics to screen for pre-eclampsia risk in pregnancy. Although we applaud their diligent and meticulous approach, we have some reservations about this study.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Fetal Alcohol Syndrome – Don't Forget the Bubbles

Alcohol use is common in Australian women with surveys suggesting that around 90% of 18-45 year olds have had a drink in the last year and that around 39% of these are unaware of the health implications of drinking on the developing fetus. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a leading cause of preventable intellectual disability. An Australian diagnostic guide has recently been developed by the Telethon Kids Institute to help clinicians make the diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders. In this post we cover some of the basics of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and provide some resources for those who want to learn more.  
dontforgetthebubbles.com
over 3 years ago
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2

Mothers With Gestational Diabetes Have Fatter Babies at 2 Months

A study finds that babies of mothers with gestational diabetes are fatter at age 2 months than those born to healthy mothers, despite no differences in adiposity at birth or rates of breastfeeding.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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ARTIFICIAL CONTRACEPTION STILL BANNED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

WHAT A PITTY AND A MISSED OPPORTUNITY. POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMS IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN ON CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics and to catholic medical care givers. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Some of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Abortion rates show regional variations - BBC News

Abortion rates among women in London are higher than the rest of England, as figures reveal wide variations across the country.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago