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Resuscitative Hysterotomy by Dr Rob Bryant

Resuscitative Hysterotomy from Rob Bryant on Vimeo.  
prehospitalmed.com
about 4 years ago
Preview
1
71

Histerectomia Vaginal, a música - Caroline Reis

Olá, pessoal! Esta é uma música baseada no glorioso castelo Rá-Tim-Bum. Tema - Técnica operatória da Histerectomia Vaginal Pra quem ficou curioso, Paola é mi...  
youtu.be
about 4 years ago
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Antenatal administration of corticosteroids for women at risk of preterm birth

The administration of certain corticosteroids to women at risk of preterm birth causes a considerable reduction in the risks of complications of prematurity such as respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular haemorrhage and perinatal death. Corticosteroid therapy should be incorporated into comprehensive maternal health care services and official guidelines for maternity care.  
apps.who.int
almost 4 years ago
4554a1c65ac4be3d327d757761944db7abff5ad28059458921785515
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Histology of the Cervix - Spanish

Aspectos histológicos y anatómicos del cuello uterino  
Mariana Arango
over 3 years ago
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ARTIFICIAL CONTRACEPTION STILL BANNED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

WHAT A PITTY AND A MISSED OPPORTUNITY. POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMS IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN ON CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics and to catholic medical care givers. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Some of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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SHOULD THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH REMOVE ITS BAN ON ARTIFICIAL METHODS OF FAMILY PLANNING?

This is a question faced by many catholic health care providers throughout the world. The Roman Catholic Church officially opposes any artificial method of family planning. When Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church (Church from here on) in February 2013 as Pope Francis, catholics all over the world were encouraged by the idea that they might see some changes in the teachings of the Church as it relates to many issues pertaining to the “family”. These issues include divorce, remarriage, homosexuality, family planning and a number of other topics. I want to focus in this discussion on the longstanding opposition by the Church to the use of artificial methods of family planning (contraception). This ban on contraception affects catholic medical practitioners on a daily basis and this includes, family doctors, RNs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and any medical care giver involved with counseling clients about methods for planning their families and implementing the chosen methods. As we know, the Church allows only “natural methods” of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods”. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. The hope for a change in this official position of the Church has been fostered by the observation that Pope Francis seemed to be willing to listen and has made a number conciliatory remarks on issues like women’s equality, divorced and remarried couples and homosexuality, while continuing to accept only the natural methods of family planning. Then came the most recent publication by Pope Francis, “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This is a beautifully written document about issues related to the family, in which the Pope makes again conciliatory remarks about a number of issues, but reaffirms the position of the Church in regards to family planning. No artificial methods are condoned. This seems to close the door on this issue, at least for the foreseeable future. What a pity and what a missed opportunity for the Pope to bring the teachings of the Church as it pertains to contraception in line with the thinking and practice of the 21st century. It is well known, and adequate statistics are available to show that worldwide a large percentage of catholics are ignoring the teaching of the church as it pertains to family planning and availing themselves of contraception to plan their families. On a personal note I have spoken to a number of priests and asked them about my practice as a catholic obstetrician and gynecologist of prescribing and implementing artificial contraception for my catholic clients. Some of them have told me to following my conscience and continue what I am doing. That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. In this regard the recent publication from the Wiingaards Institute for Catholic Research might be of interest: http://www.catholicsandcontraception.com William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Pregnancy Wheel -- Demonstration & Training Video

Pregnancy Wheel demonstration and training video. Good for nurses or other medical personnel in training, clinicians at pregnancy centers or planned parentho...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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0
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Shotgun Histology Ovary

Shotgun Histology Ovary  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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Missed ectopic pregnancy

Medical Protection Society Website  
medicalprotection.org
over 5 years ago
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High caesarean section figures in Northern Ireland questioned - BBC News

Stormont's spending watchdog questions whether the high number of caesarean sections in Northern Ireland's hospitals is to save time rather than money.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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Dilated vein

UpToDate, electronic clinical resource tool for physicians and patients that provides information on Adult Primary Care and Internal Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, Cardiovascular Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hematology, Infectious Diseases, Nephrology and Hypertension, Neurology, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, Oncology, Pediatrics, Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep Medicine, Rheumatology, Surgery, and more.  
uptodate.com
about 5 years ago
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In the case of severe postpartum haemorrhage, is it always necessary to give packed red cells?

In the case of severe postpartum haemorrhage, is it always necessary to give packed red cells?  
fathima mohideen
almost 8 years ago
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WHO | Caesarean sections should only be performed when medically necessary

​​10 APRIL 2015 | GENEVA - Caesarean section is one of the most common surgeries in the world, with rates continuing to rise, particularly in high- and middle-income countries. Although it can save lives, caesarean section is often performed without medical need, putting women and their babies at-risk of short- and long-term health problems. A new statement from the World Health Organization (WHO) underscores the importance of focusing on the needs of the patient, on a case by case basis, and discourages the practice of aiming for “target rates”.  
who.int
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
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Is early induction or expectant management more beneficial in women with late preterm pre-eclampsia?

This is one of a series of occasional articles that highlight areas of practice where management lacks convincing supporting evidence. The series adviser is David Tovey, editor in chief, the Cochrane Library. This paper is based on a research priority identified and commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research’s Health Technology Assessment programme on an important clinical uncertainty. To suggest a topic for this series, please email us at uncertainties@bmj.com.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
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Lifestyle changes or metformin reduce type 2 diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes, US study shows

Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes for years after giving birth, but intensive lifestyle changes or metformin therapy reduce this risk by more than a third, a US study has found.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
14

Is early induction or expectant management more beneficial in women with late preterm pre-eclampsia?

This is one of a series of occasional articles that highlight areas of practice where management lacks convincing supporting evidence. The series adviser is David Tovey, editor in chief, the Cochrane Library. This paper is based on a research priority identified and commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research’s Health Technology Assessment programme on an important clinical uncertainty. To suggest a topic for this series, please email us at uncertainties@bmj.com.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
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Pre surgery preparation for diabetic pregnant woman for Elective Caesarean section

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
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QUICK OBGYN: Contraindications to External Cephalic Version (ECV)

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
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Research on medical abortion and miscarriage may change international routines

Two scientific studies led by researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet are expected to form the basis of new international recommendations for the treatment of medical abortions and...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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New research shows a statistical significant association between increased LARC usage and reduction in teenage pregnancy and abortion rates in England

New findings, published in the International Journal of Women's Health, show increased long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) usage in England was significantly associated with...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago