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27
2291

Personality disorders, Eating disorders and Addictions

Revision of these psychiatric conditions.  
Aoibhin McGarrity
almost 7 years ago
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24
1601

Proton Pump Inhibitors

Revision notes on PPIs  
Sarah Wagstaffe
almost 9 years ago
29822
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517

Therapeutic Drug Monitoring: An e-learning Resource

I created this e-learning resource during my first Undergraduate Pharmacology BSc degree and it was used as a teaching aid to explain fundamental Pharmacokinetic principles to scientists carrying out Therapeutic Drug Monitoring. Having studied aspects of Pharmacology during the first year of my Graduate Entry Medical Degree at the University of Leicester, myself and my colleagues have found this interactive learning tool a valuable resource. The easy to use and interactive nature of learning allows the user to navigate around the resource and also test their knowledge on questions at the end. The effectiveness of the resource and feedback received from users is published in the journal Bioscience Horizons and can be found at http://biohorizons.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/2/113.full.pdf+html.  
Krupa Samani
over 8 years ago
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20
1068

Pharmacology - Diuretics

http://armandoh.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan ...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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16
306

The Drugs Song (Amateur Transplants)

Drs Adam Kay and Suman Biswas (aka the Amateur Transplants) have created a parody of Tom Lehrer's comic song "The Elements".  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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16
572

General Anesthetics Lecture

This is a tutorial/lecture on General Anesthetics. We cover some topics important for classes such as Pharmacology and Biochemistry.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
3880993fec67d7ba86196879992e413508fca60a3387878945929791
16
986

Time Dependent Beta Lactam Mind Map

I made this. I spent a lot of time on it, so I hope it's useful.  
Christina
about 4 years ago
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15
365

Asthma: nebuliser and inhaler use

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to use a nebuliser and explain correct inhaler technique to a patient. It is part of a series of videos covering Respiratory Medicine skills.  
Hussam Rostom
about 7 years ago
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15
753

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

An overview of ADHD  
Harriet Blundell
over 6 years ago
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15
328

Good Prescribing Guide - Prescribing guide for medical staff and students

Hello all. Just thought I would post this online resource that I have found, seeing as the paper copy is no longer being distributed by my medical school anymore. Its been promoted by Dr Thompson who said: "It is all you need to pass the prescribing exam". Anyway - its a bit wordy, but hope it helps!!  
Laila Hasan
over 5 years ago
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15
1143

Diabetes Drugs

A overview of the main groups of drugs used in diabetes with some side effects  
David Fish
over 4 years ago
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13
1030

Mnemonics for Microbiology - USMLE Forums

Mnemonics for Microbiology USMLE Step 1 Mnemonics  
usmle-forums.com
over 5 years ago
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1359

Alpha & Beta Receptors

Great notes from Tumblr.  
mynotes4usmle.tumblr.com
about 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 m4u3lk?1444774141
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I can't get my head around pharmacology

Maybe it’s just me, but I cannot get my head around pharmacology and antibiotics are certainly doing their best to finish me off! My group at uni decided that this was one area that we needed to revise, and the task fell on my hands to provide the material for a revision session. So, the night before the session I began to panic about how to come up with any useful tips for my group, or indeed anyone at all, to try to remember anything useful about antibiotics at all. If only Paracetamoxyfrusebendroneomycin was a real drug, it would make our lives so much easier. Come on Adam Kay and Suman Biswas, get the trials started and create your wonderful super drug. For the mean time I guess I will just have to keep blissfully singing along to your song. However, that is not going to help me with my task in hand. After a lot of research that even took me beyond the realms of Wikipedia (something I do not often like to do), I found various sources suggesting remembering these Top 10 Rules (and their exceptions) All cell wall inhibitors are ?-lactams (except vancomycin) All penicillins are water soluble (nafcillin) All protein synthesis inhibitors are bacteriostatic (aminoglycosides) All cocci are Gram positive (Neisseria spp.) All bacilli are Gram negative (anthrax, tetanus, botulism, diptheria) All spirochetes are Gram negative Tetracyclines and macrolides are used for intracellular bacteria Pregnant women should not take tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, fluroquinolones, or sulfonamides Antibiotics beginning with a ‘C’ are particularly associated with pseudomembranous colitis While the penicillins are the most famous for causing allergies, people may also react to cephalosporins If those work for you, then I guess you can stop reading now… If they don’t, I can’t promise that I have anything better, but give these other tips that I found a whirl… Alternatively, I have created a Page on my own blog called Rang and Dale’s answer to Antibiotics, which summarises their information, so please take a look at that. Most people will suggest that you can categorise antibiotics in three ways, and it’s best to pick one and learn examples of them. Mode of action: bactericidal (kill) bacteriostatic (stop multiplying) 2 mnemonics to potentially help you remember examples: We’re ECSTaTiC about bacteriostatics? Erythromycin Clindamycin Sulphonamides Tetracyclines Trimethoprim Chloramphenicol Very Finely Proficient At Cell Murder (bactericidal) - Vancomycin Fluroquinolones Penicillins Aminoglycosides Cephalosporins Metranidazole Spectrum of activity: broad-spectrum (gram positive AND negative) narrow (gram positive OR negative) Mechanism of action Inhibit cell wall synthesis Inhibit nucleic acid synthesis Inhibit protein synthesis Inhibit cell membrane synthesis If you have any more weird and wonderful ways to remember antibiotics, let me know and I will add them! As always, thank you for reading.  
Mrs Malaika Smith
over 5 years ago
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12
763

Why are placebos getting more effective?

Over the years the placebos used in drug trials have been getting more effective, especially in the US. Why?  
bbc.co.uk
almost 4 years ago
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11
225

Drugs: From Molecules to Man

Revision notes from First Year at The University of Manchester Faculty of Life Sciences. There may be blocks of text copied from such books as Rang and Dale, if there are any issues with copyright or plagiarism please inform me and I'll remove this resource immediately.  
Daniel Sapier
about 8 years ago
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434

Autonomic Nervous system Pharmacology

This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing lectures for students across the globe. Our lectures are oversimplified for adequate learning, less memorization and proper understanding of difficult concept in clinical medicine.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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191

Pharmacology - Glucocorticoids

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Aracidonic Acid: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSc9U8JaWYg Osteoporosis: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2cz2rkBy2rg  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 113s0nw?1444773969
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378

The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

As the days are slowly getting longer, and spring looms in the near future, it can only be the deep inhale of the medical student ready to embrace the months of revision that lies ahead. Books are dusted off the shelves and Gray's anatomy wrenched open with an immense sigh of distain. But which book should we be pulling off the shelves? If you're anything like me then you're a medical book hoarder. Now let me "Google define" this geeky lexis lingo - a person who collects medical books (lots of medical books) and believes by having the book they will automatically do better!... I wish with a deep sigh! So when I do actually open the page of one, as they are usually thrown across the bed-room floor always closed, it is important to know which one really is the best to choose?!? These are all the crazy thoughts of the medical book hoarder, however, there is some sanity amongst the madness. That is to say, when you find a really good medical book and get into the topic you start to learn stuff thick and fast, and before you know it you’ll be drawing out neuronal pathways and cardiac myocyte action potentials. Yet, the trick is not picking up the shiniest and most expensive book, oh no, otherwise we would all be walking around with the 130 something pounds gray’s anatomy atlas. The trick is to pick a book that speaks to you, and one in which you can get your head around – It’s as if the books each have their own personality. Here are a list of books that I would highly recommend: Tortora – Principles of anatomy and physiology Tortora is a fantastic book for year 1 medical students, it is the only book I found that truly bridges the gap between A levels and medical students without going off on a ridiculous and confusing tangent. While it lacks subtle detail, it is impressive in how simplified it can make topics appear, and really helps build a foundation to anatomy and physiology knowledge The whole book is easy to follow and numerous pretty pictures and diagrams, which make learning a whole lot easier. Tortora scores a whopping 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Sherwood – From cells to systems Sherwood is the marmite of the medical book field, you either love this book or your hate it. For me, Sherwood used to be my bible in year two. It goes into intricate physiological detail in every area of the body. It has great explanations and really pushes your learning to a greater level than tortora in year one. The book doesn’t just regurgitate facts it really explores concepts. However: I cannot be bias, and I must say that I know a number of people who hate this book in every sense of the word. A lot of people think there is too much block text without distractions such as pictures or tables. They think the text is very waffly, not getting straight to the point and sometimes discusses very advanced concepts that do not appear relevant The truth be told, if you want to study from Sherwood you need to a very good attention span and be prepared to put in the long-hours of work so it’s not for everyone. Nonetheless, if you manage to put the effort in, you will reap the rewards! Sherwood scores a fair 5-6/10 by the medical book hoarder Moore & Dalley – Clinical anatomy At first glance Moore & Dalley can be an absolute mindfield with an array of pastel colours that all amalgamate into one! It’s also full of table after table of muscle and blood vessels with complicated diagrams mixed throughout. This is not a medical book for the faint hearted, and if your foundation of anatomy is a little shakey you’ll fall further down the rabbit hole than Alice ever did. That being said, for those who have mastered the simplistic anatomy of tortora and spent hours pondering anatomy flash cards, this may be the book for you. Moore & Dalley does not skimp on the detail and thus if you’re willing to learn the ins and out of the muscles of the neck then look no further. Its sections are actually broken down nicely into superficial and deep structures and then into muscles, vessels, nerves and lymph, with big sections on organs. This is a book for any budding surgeon! Moore & Dalley scores a 6/10 by the medical book hoarder Macleod’s clinical examination Clinical examination is something that involves practical skills and seeing patients, using your hands to manipulate the body in ways you never realised you could. Many people will argue that the day of the examination book is over, and it’s all about learning while on the job and leaving the theory on the book shelf. I would like to oppose this theory, with claims that a little understanding of theory can hugely improve your clinical practice. Macleod’s takes you through basic history and examination skills within each of the main specialties, discussing examination sequences and giving detailed explanations surrounding examination findings. It is a book that you can truly relate to what you have seen or what you will see on the wards. My personal opinion is that preparation is the key, and macleod’s is the ultimate book to give you that added confidence become you tackle clinical medicine on the wards Macleod’s clinical examination scores a 7/10 by the medical book hoarder Oxford textbook of clinical pathology When it comes to learning pathology there are a whole host of medical books on the market from underwood to robbins. Each book has its own price range and delves into varying degrees of complexity. Robbins is expensive and a complex of mix of cellular biology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Underwood is cheap, but lacking in certain areas and quite difficult to understand certain topics. The Oxford textbook of clinical pathology trumps them all. The book is fantastic for any second year or third year attempting to learn pathology and classify disease. It is the only book that I have found that neatly categories diseases in a way in which you can follow, helping you to understand complications of certain diseases, while providing you with an insight into pathology. After reading this book you’ll be sure to be able to classify all the glomerulonephritis’s while having at least some hang of the pink and purples of the histological slide. Oxford textbook of clinical pathology scores a 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Medical Pharmacology at glance Pharmacology is the arch nemesis of the Peninsula student (well maybe if we discount anatomy!!), hours of time is spent avoiding the topic followed immediately by hours of complaining we are never taught any of it. Truth be told, we are taught pharmacology, it just comes in drips and drabs. By the time we’ve learnt the whole of the clotting cascade and the intrinsic mechanisms of the P450 pathway, were back on to ICE’ing the hell out of patients and forget what we learned in less than a day. Medical pharmacology at a glance however, is the saviour of the day. I am not usually a fan of the at a glance books. I find that they are just a book of facts in a completely random order that don’t really help unless you’re an expert in the subject. The pharmacology version is different: It goes into just the right amount of detail without throwing you off the cliff with discussion about bioavailability and complex half-life curves relating to titration and renal function. This book has the essential drugs, it has the essential facts, and it is the essential length, meaning you don’t have to spend ours reading just to learn a few facts! In my opinion, this is one of those books that deserves the mantel piece! Medical Pharmacology at a glance scores a whopping 9/10 by the medical book hoarder. Anatomy colouring book This is the last book in our discussion, but by far the greatest. After the passing comments about this book by my housemates, limited to the sluggish boy description of “it’s terrible” or “its S**t”, I feel I need to hold my own and defend this books corner. If your description of a good book is one which is engaging, interesting, fun, interaction, and actually useful to your medical learning then this book has it all. While it may be a colouring book and allows your autistic side to run wild, the book actually covers a lot of in depth anatomy with some superb pictures that would rival any of the big anatomical textbooks. There is knowledge I have gained from this book that I still reel off during the question time onslaught of surgery. Without a doubt my one piece of advice to all 1st and 2nd years would be BUY THIS BOOK and you will not regret it! Anatomy colouring book scores a tremendous 10/10 by the medical book hoarder Let the inner GEEK run free and get buying:)!!  
Benjamin Norton
over 6 years ago
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158

Digoxin Revision

 
Sarah Wagstaffe
almost 9 years ago