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1402

Medical Student Apps: Chest X-ray Interpretation (for beginners)

This video tutorial has been made for use with Medical Student Apps: Chest Xrays, an application for the iPhone and iPad. Download the app here for free: htt...  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
2
13
639

watch

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
Preview
11
1239

Physiology and Mechanics of Breathing

The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only.  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
11
289

ECG Interpretation - ECG Lead Perspectives

http://www.acadoodle.com The different leads of the ECG examine cardiac electrical activity from different perspectives. In this video we teach you the perspectives of the 12 ECG leads on cardiac depolarosiation and repolarisation. We consider the 12 leads in two groups of six, with the six chest leads (V1-V6, also referred to as the precordial leads) examining the flow of cardiac depolarisation and repolarisation in the horizontal plan and a second group of six leads (the standard leads and augmented leads) which examine these events in the vertical plane. For the experienced practitioner, looking at different areas on the ECG readout is like looking at different anatomical regions of the heart. Also, understanding the lead perspectives is crucial in the interpretation of cardiac arrhythmias. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 3 years ago
Preview
8
442

What is afterload?

Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy.  
khanacademy.org
over 1 year ago
13
6
249

Diuretics and Antihypertensives - USMLE Step 2 and 3

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
13
6
245

watch

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
2
6
382

ECG Interpretation - ECG Nomenclature

http://www.acadoodle.com In this video we review the nomenclature of the ECG readout. You will learn that the deflection produced by atrial depolarisation is termed a P wave while ventricular depolarisation produces the qrs complex. You will also learn the correct nomenclature of individual deflections within the qrs complex and some important terms used in ECG analysis. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 3 years ago
Preview
5
144

ECG Interpretation - Cardiac Electrical Activity

http://www.acadoodle.com Contraction of the atria and ventricles is tightly coordinated by a wave of depolarisation spreading through the muscular walls of these chambers. The depolarisation wave reflects movement of charge across cardiomyocyte membranes and is in effect an electrical current spreading through the heart. Following contraction, cardiac muscle returns to a resting state and this is associated with reversal of the movement of charge across the myocyte membranes, this second wave of electrical activity is termed cardiac repolarisation. The leads of the ECG machine are designed to detect and record these two waves of cardiac electrical activity. The depolarisation and repolarisation waves spread through the heart in a highly predictable pattern and to understand the ECG readout, the pattern of spread of cardiac electrical activity needs to be understood. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 3 years ago
F8cf5a809a660bb4600433b264abd6e0
10
483

The NHS needs to learn a lesson from the Military MDT approach

I have recently spent a few days following around registrars on military ward rounds. It has been a fantastic experience for learning about trauma care and rehab, but more importantly it has shown me just how vital team spirit is to modern health care! The military ward round is done once a week. It starts with a huge MDT of almost 40 people, including nurses, physios, registrars and consultants from all of the specialities involved in trauma and rehab. The main trauma ward round team then go to speak to all of the patients in the hospital. The team normally consists of at least one T+O consultant, one plastics, two physios, two nurses, 3 registrars and a few others. This ward round team is huge, unweildly and probably very costly, but those military patients receive a phenomenal level of care that is very quick and efficient. Having then compared this level of care with what I have experience on my 4th year speciality medicine placement, I now feel the NHS has a lot to learn about team work. I am sure that everyone working in healthcare can relate to situations where patients have been admitted under the care of one team, who don’t really know what to do with the patient but struggle on bravely until they are really lost and then look around to see who they can beg for help. The patient then gets ping-ponged around for a few days while management plans are made separately. All of the junior doctors are stressed because they keep having to contact multiple teams to ask what should be done next. The patient is left feeling that their care wasn’t handled very well and is probably less than happy with the delay to their definite treatment. The patient, thankfully, normally ends up getting the correct treatment eventually, but there is often a massive prolongation of their stay in hospital. These prolonged stays are not good for the patient due to increasing risks of complications, side effects, hospital acquired infections etc. They are not good for the health care staff, who get stressed that their patients aren’t receiving the optimum care. The delays are very bad for the NHS managers, who might miss targerts, lose funding and have to juggle beds even more than normal. Finally, it is not good for the NHS as a hole, which has to stump up the very expensive fees these delays cause (approximately £500 a night). There is a simple solution to this which would save a huge amount of time, energy and money. TEAM WORK! Every upper-GI ward round should be done with the consultant surgeon team and a gastroenterologist (even a trainee would probably do) and vice versa, every Gastroenterology ward round should have a surgeon attached. Every orthopaedic ward round should be done with an elderly care physician, physio/rehab specialist and a social worker. Every diabetic foot clinic should have a diabetologist, podiatrist, vascular surgeon and/or orthopaedic surgeon (even trainees). Etc. etc. etc. A more multi-disciplinary team approach will make patient care quicker, more appropriate and less stressful for everyone involved. It would benefit the patients, the staff and the NHS. To begin with it might not seem like an easy situation to arrange. Everyone is over worked, no one has free time, no one has much of a spare budget and everyone has an ego. But... Team work will be essential to improving the NHS. Many MDTs already exist as meetings. MDTs already exist as ED trauma teams, ED resus teams and Military trauma teams. There is no reason why lessons can’t be learnt from these examples and applied to every other field of medicine. I know that as medical students (and probably every other health care student) the theory of how MDTs should work is rammed down our throats time after time, but I personally still think the NHS has a long way to go to live up to the whole team work ethos and that we as the younger, idealist generation of future healthcare professionals should make this one of our key aims for our future careers. When we finally become senior health care professionals we should try our best to make all clinical encounters an MDT approach.  
jacob matthews
almost 4 years ago
Preview
3
79

Acute Bronchitis - CRASH! Medical Review Series

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
1
7
361

watch

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
5
4
42

ECG Interpretation - Predicted Normal ECG - Chest Leads

Using the basic principles outlined in our previous videos we can easily predict the morphology of the ECG read-out in the 6 chest leads. http://www.acadoodle.com Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 3 years ago
8c68f084791aaf5f4475d6c9c0266737
10
906

Problem based learning - Friend or Foe?

What is Problem Based Learning? During my time at medical school, I enjoyed (at times) a curriculum delivered through the traditional model. As the name suggests, this is an approach experienced by the majority of doctors to date. The traditional model was first implemented by the American Medical College Association and American Academy of Medicine in 1894 (Barr, 2010) and has been used by the majority of medical schools. It traditionally consists of didactic lectures in the initial years covering the basic sciences followed by clinical years, where students learn clinical medicine while attending hospital placements. Is It Better? A few years after my graduation I found myself teaching at a university which had fully adopted the use of problem based learning (PBL) in the delivery of their curriculum. PBL is a philosophy of teaching that has increasingly been used in medical education over the past 40 years. It has rapidly been replaced or supplemented in medical education as opposed to the traditional model. PBL seeks to promote a more integrated and active approach to learning right from the first year with less reliance on didactic lectures. Having been involved in these two different approaches to medical education, I was interested to explore what the evidence was for and against each. For the purposes of this blog, I have looked at four specific areas. These include student attitudes, academic achievement, the academic process of learning and clinical functioning and skills. Student Attitudes Student attitudes to PBL have been highly featured in studies and many show that there is a clear favourability towards this philosophy of teaching. Blumberg and Eckenfel (1988) found that students in a problem based preclinical curriculum rated this three times higher than those in the a traditional group in terms of what they expect to experience, what they would like, and what they actually experienced. Heale et al (1988) found physicians in the problem-solving sessions rated a Continuing Medical Education short course higher compared to others who attended traditional lectures and large-group sessions. Vernon and Black (1993) performed a Meta analysis on 12 studies that looked at attitudes and towards PBL and found PBL was favored in some way by all studies. PBL appears to be preferred by the majority of students at a range of academic levels. However, Trappler (2006) found that converting a conventional curriculum to a problem based learning model for part of a psychopathology course did not show complete favourability. Students preferred the conventional lectures given by experts, rather than PBL groups run by mentors and not experts. They did however show preference towards PBL small group sessions run by experts Academic Achievement Academic achievement is an important factor to assess. Vernon and Blake (1993) compared a number of studies and found that those, which could be compared, showed a significant trend favouring traditional teaching methods. However, it was felt this might not be reliable. When looking at the heterogeneity of the studies there was significant variation that could not be accounted for by chance alone. Interestingly, they found that there was significant geographical variation across the United States such that New Mexico showed consistently negative effects and Michigan State showed consistently positive. Other studies have shown that the traditional method may show a slightly better outcome when assessing academic achievement. Schmidt et al (1987) looked at the same progress test taken among students in six different Universities in the Netherlands and found that those taught by a traditional approach showed slightly better outcomes. Baca et al (1990) compared performances of medical students in two separate tracks, one PBL the other a traditional model. Baca et al found that PBL students scored slightly lower in the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) examinations. Dochy et al (2003) conducted a meta analysis comparing 43 studies and found that when considering the effect of PBL on the knowledge of students the combined effect size is slightly negative. The academic process of learning It is important in medical education to enable people to continue life long learning, to overcome problems and fill in knowledge gaps. Coles (1990) and Entwistle (1983) found that PBL students would place more emphasis on understanding and meaning compared to just rote learning, seen more in those taught by a traditional approach. Students on a PBL course also place more focus on using resources such as the library and online sources rather than those taught in a traditional approach (Rankin, 1992). Students taught by a traditional model place more emphasis on the resources supplied by the faculty itself. It has also been shown that students who learn through a process of problem solving, are more likely to use this spontaneously to solve new problems in the future compared with those taught in a traditional way (Bransford et al, 1989). Clinical functioning and skills Clinical competence is an important aspect in medical education and has been measured in studies comparing PBL and traditional methods. The traditional model focuses acquisition of clinical competence in the final years of a program with hospital placements. In a PBL course it may be more integrated early on. There are however, only a few studies that look at clinical competence gained in undergraduate PBL courses. Vernon and Blake (1993) compared some of these studies and found that students obtained better clinical functioning in a PBL setting compared to a traditional approach. This was statistically significant, however there was still significant heterogeneity amongst studies and for conclusive results to be made 110 studies would have to be compared, rather that the 16 samples they were able to use. They also found that in contrast to the NBME I giving better results in the traditional model, PBL students score slightly higher in NBME II and federation licensing examination which related more on clinical functioning than basic sciences. On reflection, this evidence has indicated to me that PBL is a very valuable approach and it has a number of benefits. The traditional model in which I was taught has provided a good level of academic education. However, it may not have supported me as well as a PBL course in other areas of medical education such as academic process, clinical functioning and satisfaction. On reflection and current recommendations are for a hybridisation of the PBL and traditional approach to be used (Albanese, 2010) and I would support this view in light of the evidence. References Baca, E., Mennin, S. P., Kaufman, A., and Moore-West, M. A Comparison between a Problem-Based, Community Orientated track and Traditional track Within One Medical school. In Innovation in Medical Education; An Evaluation of Its Present Status. New York: Springer publishing Barr D. (2010) Revolution or evolution? Putting the Flexner Report in context. Medical Education; 45: 17–22 Blumberg P, Eckenfels E. (1988) A comparison of student satisfaction with their preclinical environment in a traditional and a problem based curriculum. Research in Medical Education: Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh Annual Conference, pp. 60- 65 Bransford, J. D., Franks, J. J., Vye, N. J., & Sherwood, R. D. (1989). New Approaches to Instruction: Because Wisdom Can't Be Told. In S. Vosiadou & A. Ortony (Eds.), Similarity and Analogical Reasoning (pp. 470 297). New York: Cambridge University Press. Coles CR. (1990) Evaluating the effects curricula have on student learning: toward a more competent theory for medical education. In: Innovation in medical education: an evaluation of its present status. New York: Springer publishing; 1990;76-93. Dochy F., Segersb M., Van den Bosscheb P., Gijbelsb D., (2003) Effects of problem-based learning: a meta-analysis. Learning and Instruction. 13:5, 533-568 Entwistle NJ, Ramsden P. Understanding student learning. London: Croom Helm; 1983 Heale J, Davis D, Norman G, Woodward C, Neufeld V, Dodd P. (1988) A randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of problem-based versus didactic teaching methods in CME. Research in Medical Education.;27:72-7. Trappler B., (2006) Integrated problem-based learning in the neuroscience curriculum - the SUNY Downstate experience. BMC Medical Education 6: 47. Rankin JA. Problem-based medical education: effect on library use. Bull Med Libr Assoc 1992;80:36-43. Schmidt, H G; Dauphinee, W D; Patel, V L (1987) Comparing the effects of problem-based and conventional curricula in an international sample Journal of Medical Education. 62(4): 305-15 Vernon D. T., Blake R. L., (1993) Does Problem-based learning work? A meta-analysis of evaluated research. Academic Medicine.  
Dr Alastair Buick
over 4 years ago
1
5
183

watch

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
2
82

COPD - CRASH! Medical Review Series

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
7
158

Dr. Kman - Why Emergency Medicine?

Nicholas Kman, MD, is a physician in the Emergency Department at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Dr. Kman explains why he chose to specializ...  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
13
3
192

ECG Interpretation - Bundle Branch Block

http://www.acadoodle.com Isolated dysfunction or damage of either of the main branches of the bundle of His is commonly observed in clinical practice. The pattern of ECG changes associated with right and left bundle branch block are predictable and you must be able to recognise them on the ECG. Complete right bundle branch block (RBBB) and complete left bundle branch block (LBBB) produce prolongation of the qrs complex and predictable morphological changes on the ECG. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 3 years ago
11
4
53

ECG Interpretation - AV Nodal Re-entrant Tachycardia

http://www.acadoodle.com The combination of an unfortunately timed atrial ectopic and the existence of two strands of conducting tissue with opposite electrical properties in the junctional region of the heart can establish a rapidly discharging, self sustaining, re-entrant loop of depolarising current. This current will be discharged distally into the ventricles and also in a retrograde fashion into the atria. This is the mechanism underlying a common paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT); AVNRT. We will explain the mechanism underlying AVNRT in this video. Understanding the underlying mechanism generating this tachycardia will help you identify this common arrhythmia on the ECG. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 3 years ago
1
2
36

Child Sexual Abuse

This podcast deals with the child sexual abuse.This podcast outlines the physicians’ role and management in acute and historic child sexual assault cases. In addition, the physical findings associated with sexual assault are described. In general, very few physicians are comfortable managing child sexual assaults. This podcast was written by Dr. Melanie Lewis. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician at the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton. She is also the Program Director of the Pediatric Forensics fellowship program and the Year 3 Clerkship Director for Pediatrics at the University of Alberta. These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content on www.pedscases.com.  
Pedscases.Com
about 7 years ago