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4
14

Foreign Body Obstruction - CRASH! Medical Review Series

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
Preview
4
56

Hyperadrenalism - CRASH! Medical Review Series

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
Preview
4
78

Endocrine Physiology Review - CRASH! Medical Review Series

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
Preview
4
131

Changes in Burnout and Satisfaction With Work-Life Balance in Physicians and the General US Working Population Between 2011 and 2014 - Mayo Clinic Proceedings

To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or purchase a subscription. Click here to view the full text on ScienceDirect.  
mayoclinicproceedings.org
over 3 years ago
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3
145

ECG Interpretation - Atrio-Ventricular Block

http://www.acadoodle.com Atrial depolarisation is transmitted to the ventricular myocardium by the AV node and intraventricular conducting system. The time between the onset of atrial depolarisation and the release of depolarisation into the ventricular myocardium from the terminal branches of the conducting system is represented by the PR interval on the ECG. Dysfunction of the AV node or diffuse damage to components of the ventricular conducting system can result in a delay or even failure of transmission of atrial depolarisation into the ventricular muscle mass. This situation is referred to as atrioventricular or AV block. Three degrees of AV block are recognised. First degree AV block is defined by transmission of all P waves to the ventricular myocardium but with prolongation of the PR interval beyond the upper limit of normal on the ECG. Second degree AV block is defined by failure of conduction of some P waves into the ventricles. In third degree or 'complete' AV block, no P waves are transmitted to the ventricular myocardium. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 5 years ago
Preview
3
132

Acadoodle.com - Time and the ECG (Section 1.5, Part 1)

http://www.acadoodle.com Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 5 years ago
12
3
16

Time and the ECG (Section 1.5, Part 2)

http://www.acadoodle.com Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 5 years ago
13
3
233

ECG Interpretation - Bundle Branch Block

http://www.acadoodle.com Isolated dysfunction or damage of either of the main branches of the bundle of His is commonly observed in clinical practice. The pattern of ECG changes associated with right and left bundle branch block are predictable and you must be able to recognise them on the ECG. Complete right bundle branch block (RBBB) and complete left bundle branch block (LBBB) produce prolongation of the qrs complex and predictable morphological changes on the ECG. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1njk26?1444774138
3
131

Doctor or a scientist?

"One special advantage of the skeptical attitude of mind is that a man is never vexed to find that after all he has been in the wrong" Sir William Osler Well, it's almost Christmas. I know it's Christmas because the animal skeleton situated in the reception of my University's Anatomy School has finally been re-united with his (or her?) Christmas hat, has baubles for eyes and tinsel on its ribcage. This doesn't help with my trying to identify it (oh the irony if it is indeed a reindeer). This term has probably been one of the toughest academic terms I've had, but then when you intercalate that is sort of what you choose to let yourself in for. I used to think that regular readings were a chore in the pre-clinical years. I had ample amounts of ethics, sociology and epidemiology readings to do but this is nothing compared to the world of scientific papers. The first paper I had to read this term related to Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) integrity in articular cartilage and its possible role in the pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis. Well, I know that now. When I first started reading it felt very much like a game of boggle and highly reminiscent of high school spanish lessons where I just sat and nodded my head. This wasn't the end. Every seminar has come with its own prescribed reading list. The typical dose is around 4-5 papers. This got me thinking. We don't really spend all that much time understanding how to read scientific papers nor do we really explore our roles as 'scientists' as well as future clinicians. Training programmes inevitably seem to create false divides between the 'clinicans' and the 'academics' and sometimes this has negative consequences - one simply criticises the other: Doctors don't know enough about science, academics are out of touch with the real world etc... Doctors as scientists... The origins of medicine itself lie with some of the greatest scientists of all time - Herophilus, Galen, Da Vinci, William Harvey (the list is endless). As well as being physicians, all of these people were also respected scientists who regularly made contributions to our understanding of the body's mechanics. Albeit, the concept of ethics was somewhat thrown to the wind (Herophilus, though dead for thousands of years, is regularly accused of performing vivisections on prisoners in his discovery of the duodenum). Original sketches by William Harvey which proved a continuous circuit of blood being supplied and leaving the upper limb. He used his observations to explain the circulatory system as we know it today What was unique about these people? The ability to challenge what they saw. They made observations, tested them against their own knowledge and asked more questions - they wanted to know more. As well as being doctors, we have the unique opportunity to make observations and question what we see. What's causing x to turn into y? What trends do we see in patients presenting with x? The most simple question can lead to the biggest shift in understanding. It only took Semmelweiss to ask why women were dying in a maternity ward to give rise to our concept of modern infection control. Bad Science... Anyone who has read the ranting tweets, ranting books and ranting YouTube TED videos of academic/GP Ben Goldacre will be familiar with this somewhat over used term. Pseudoscience (coined by the late great Karl Popper) is a much more sensible and meaningful term. Science is about gathering evidence which supports your hypothesis. Pseudoscience is a field which makes claims that cannot be tested by a study. In truth, there's lots and lots of relatively useless information in print. It's fine knowing about biomarker/receptor/cytokine/antibody/gene/transcription factor (insert meaningless acronym here) but how is it relevant and how does it fit into the bigger picture? Science has become reductionist. We're at the gene level and new reducing levels of study (pharmacogenetics) break this down even further and sometimes, this is at an expense of providing anything useful to your clinicial toolbox. Increasing job competition and post-graduate 'scoring' systems has also meant there's lots of rushed research in order to get publications and citations. This runs the danger of further undermining the doctors role as a true contributor to science. Most of it is wrong... I read an article recently that told me at least 50% of what I learn in medical school will be proven wrong in my lifetime. That might seem disheartening since I may have pointlessly consumed ample coffee to revise erroneous material. However, it's also exciting. What if you prove it wrong? What if you contributed to changing our understanding? As a doctor, there's no reason why you can't. If we're going to practice evidence-based medicine then we need to understand that evidence and doing this requires us to wear our scientist hat. It would be nice to see a whole generation of doctors not just willing to accept our understanding but to challenge that which is tentative. That's what science is all about. Here's hoping you don't find any meta-analyses in your stockings. Merry Christmas.  
Lucas Brammar
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 e7fpn8?1444774293
3
331

The Importance Of Clinical Skills

In the USA the issue of indiscriminate use of expensive, sophisticated, and time consuming test in lieu of, rather than in addition to, the clinical exam is being much discussed. The cause of this problem is of course multifactorial. One of the factors is the decline of the teaching of clinical skills to our medical students and trainees. Such problems seem to have taken hold in developing countries as well. Two personal anecdotes will illustrate this. In the early nineties I worked for two years as a faculty member in the department of ob & gyn at the Aga Khan University Medical School in Karachi, Pakistan. One day, I received a call from the resident in the emergency room about a woman who had come in because of some abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. While the resident told me these two symptoms her next sentence was: “… and the pelvic ultrasound showed…” I stopped her right in her tracks before she could tell me the result of the ultrasound scan. I told her: “First tell me more about this patient. Does she look ill? Is she bleeding heavily? Is she in a lot of pain and where is the pain? What are her blood pressure and pulse rate? How long has she been having these symptoms? When was her last menstrual period? What are your findings when you examined her ? What is the result of the pregnancy test?”. The resident could not answer most of these basic clinical questions and findings. She had proceeded straight to a test which might or might not have been necessary or even indicated and she was not using her clinical skills or judgment. In another example, the resident, also in Karachi, called me to the emergency room about a patient with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. He told me that the patient was pale, and obviously bleeding inside her abdomen and on the verge of going into shock. The resident had accurately made the diagnosis, based on the patient’s history, examination, and a few basic laboratory tests. But when I ran down to see the patient, he was wheeling the patient into the radiology department for an ultrasound. "Why an ultrasound?" I asked. “You already have made the correct diagnosis and she needs an urgent operation not another diagnostic procedure that will take up precious time before we can stop the internal bleeding.” Instead of having the needless ultrasound, the patient was wheeled into the operating room. What I am trying to emphasize is that advances in technology are great but they need to be used judiciously and young medical students and trainees need to be taught to use their clinical skills first and then apply new technologies, if needed, to help them to come to the right diagnosis and treatment. And of course we, practicing physicians need to set the example. Or am I old fashioned and not with it? Medico legal and other issues may come to play here and I am fully aware of these. However the basic issue of clinical exam is still important. Those wanting to read more similar stories can download a free e book from Smashwords. The title is: "CROSSCULTURAL DOCTORING. ON AND OFF THE BEATEN PATH." You can access the e book here.  
DR William LeMaire
about 5 years ago
Preview
3
92

Acute Bronchitis - CRASH! Medical Review Series

(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnos...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
5
2
59

Focus On: Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

With approximately 600,000 cases and 50,000 deaths per year, this condition challenges emergency physicians to be diligent in their patient evaluation and knowledgeable in their interpretation of nonspecific tests.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
almost 9 years ago
5
2
82

Climbing Everest

Terry OConnor talks with ercast about climbing Mt Everest and being an expedition physician<br><br>An experience with delayed sequence intubation<br><br>Rob is interviewed on <a href="http://www.skepreview.com/2010/06/interview-with-dogma-free-americas-dr.html">The Skeptical Review</a> website<br><br>A letter from Dr. Ken Walker about the international emergency medicine and the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pfid.net/">Partners for International Development</a>  
Rob Orman, MD
almost 9 years ago
0
2
105

Early Surgery Improves Outcomes Following Critical Burns

<p>Early surgical excision is likely to be the most significant individual variable to imporve the outcome of a patient (adult or child) with a critical burn.&nbsp; Nevertheless, many nonburn physicians still want to apply to 1970 treatment paradigms to this population of injured patients.&nbsp;&nbsp; This episode will hopefull replace these falsehoods with fact supported in the literature.&nbsp; </p>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
almost 9 years ago
1
2
68

Child Sexual Abuse

This podcast deals with the child sexual abuse.This podcast outlines the physicians’ role and management in acute and historic child sexual assault cases. In addition, the physical findings associated with sexual assault are described. In general, very few physicians are comfortable managing child sexual assaults. This podcast was written by Dr. Melanie Lewis. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician at the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton. She is also the Program Director of the Pediatric Forensics fellowship program and the Year 3 Clerkship Director for Pediatrics at the University of Alberta. These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content on www.pedscases.com.  
Pedscases.Com
almost 9 years ago
Preview
2
109

Arterial Blood Gas primer- Clinical Respiratory Diseases & Critical Care Medicine, Seattle - Med 610 - University of Washington School of Medicine

Arterial blood gases play an important role in the work-up and management of critically ill patients and patients with a variety of pulmonary complaints and disorders. For example, they are used to guide the adjustment of ventilator parameters on mechanically ventilated patients and are also a standard part of the work-up of patients who present with unexplained hypoxemia or dyspnea. It is, therefore, important that students and physicians be able to interpret the results of arterial blood gas sampling, determine the patient's acid-base status and assess the adequacy of oxygenation.  
courses.washington.edu
over 4 years ago
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2
44

Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip - American Family Physician

Screening programs relying primarily on physical examination techniques for the early detection and treatment of congenital hip abnormalities have not been as consistently successful as expected. Since the 1980s, increased attention has been given to ultrasound imaging of the hip in young infants (less than five months of age) as a possible tool for improving patient outcomes. Although ultrasound examination may not provide advantages over careful repeated physician examination for universal screening, a growing body of evidence indicates that ultrasound surveillance of mild abnormalities can reduce the need for bracing without worsening outcomes. Radiographic documentation of hip normality after the femoral nucleus of ossification has appeared (at three to five month of age) is still appropriate to rule out hip dysplasia.  
aafp.org
about 4 years ago
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2
35

Microbial Pathogenesis

The fact that infectious diseases claim over 17 million victims worldwide each year, along with the regular emergence of new drug resistance pathogens, signals that infectious diseases will continue to be a daily concern of the Physician well into the future. This reality requires that today's medical students develop a solid foundation in medical microbiology -- a foundation they can achieved by using IMS: Microbial Pathogenesis. This book is developed in response to the changing field of medical microbiology. The number of diseases and the diversity of microbial pathogens that cause these diseases are far too many for simple taxonomic organization. As a result, IMS Microbial Pathogenesis focuses on the common principles of infection rather than the old taxonomic organization, enabling a better long term retention of relevant material, and minimizing the short-term memorization of specific "factoids," many of which may become out-dated in a short time.  
books.google.co.uk
about 4 years ago
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2
25

Why I became an occupational physician…

We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more  
occmed.oxfordjournals.org
about 4 years ago
Preview
2
163

What is Intestinal Malrotation? | Pediatric Surgical Associates

We are here to better serve our patients, their families and the physicians who help treat them. This site is yet one more tool to aid in patient treatment and to provide knowledge to families, physicians, and caregivers.  
rileypediatricsurgery.com
about 4 years ago