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Nephron Function Tutorial

This tutorial explores the function of the nephron, in particular: Filtration, Reabsorption, Secretion and Excretion.  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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7
467

Heart Physiology Tutorial

Covering Cardiac Myocyte and Membrane Potential.  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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15
440

Bilirubin Pathway

This tutorial explains the Bilirubin Pathway from the destruction of Red Blood Cells to the excretion of Bilirubin in the Bile, Faeces and Urine.  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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1
27

Spinal Cord Compression

Physiology and anatomy The spinal cord runs from C1 (junction with the medulla), to about L1, where it becomes the cauda equina. Note that it terminates lower down in children – the spinal cord cannot grow as well as the rest of the body! The spinal cord gets its blood supply mainly from the vertebral arteries.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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3
95

Basic Adrenal Physiology | almostadoctor

Basic Adrenal Physiology outlined on almostadoctor.co.uk  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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4
56

Basic Physiology of Metabolism

Only 1% of pancreatic tissue is endocrine. This tissue is found in the Islets of langerhans. Surrounding the islets are adipose tissue deposits. The older you get, the more adipose tissue you have. There are four types of cell in the islets of langerhans, alpha, beta, delta and F. Alpha and beta secreted substances involved with control of glucose, delta and F cells control the level of action of the gastrointestinal tract.     
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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2
136

Basic Liver Physiology

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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4
56

Basic Gastric Physiology

There are basically two regions in the stomach, which contain two different lots of cells, which have different functions: Oxyntic glandular area – this contains oxyntic (parietal cells) that secrete gastric juice and intrinsic factor, as well as chief (peptic cells) that secrete pepsinogen Antral (lower) region – this contains G cells that secrete gastrin. G cells are also found in the duodenum.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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3
89

Normal Physiology of Pregnancy

In pregnancy almost all of the mother’s organ systems need to adapt, and several factors, such as age, ethnicity, and genetic factors all affect how well she adapts to being pregnant. There are four reasons why the mother’s body needs to adapt.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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1
71

Basic Renal Physiology

Cortical nephrons make up 85% of nephrons. Juxtamedullary nephrons make up 15% of nephrons.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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1
24

GCS, Coma and Impaired Consciousness

Pathophysiology Consciousness is closely related to the reticular activating system. This means that many focal brain lesions above the level of the RAS will not affect consciousness – unless the lesion causes downward pressure   Intracranial causes of altered consciousness Trauma Head Injury 2000 per 100 000 per year  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 8 years ago
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2
28

Perinatal Physiology

Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis of Perinatal Physiology from the Professional Version of the Merck Manuals.  
merckmanuals.com
almost 8 years ago
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26
1908

Ear Anatomy & Physiology

Ms. Klemme discusses basic ear anatomy and an introduction to the hearing pathway.  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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14
636

Atrial Fibrillation Symptoms & Treatments

NorthShore University HealthSystem Cardiac Electrophysiologists Wes Fisher, M.D., Jose Nazari, M.D. and Alex Ro, M.D. discuss atrial fibrillation.  
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almost 8 years ago
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1
28

Physiology Tutorial - Blood Flow

The task of maintaining an adequate interstitial homeostasis (the proper nutritional environment surrounding all cells in your body) requires that blood flows almost continuously through each of the millions of capillaries in the body. The following is a brief description of the parameters that govern flow through a given vessel. All bloods vessels have certain lengths (L) and internal radii (r) through which blood flows when the pressure in the inlet and outlet are unequal (Pi and Po respectively); in other words there is a pressure difference (ΔP) between the vessel ends, which supplies the driving force for flow. Because friction develops between moving blood and the stationary vessels walls, this fluid movement has a given resistance (vascular), which is the measure of how difficult it is to move blood through a vessel. One can then describe a relative relationship between vascular flow, the pressure difference, and resistance (i.e., the basic flow equation):  
vhlab.umn.edu
almost 8 years ago
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2
54

Human Physiology - Respiration 1/6 - Best Explanation!

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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1
28

Human Physiology - Respiration 2/6 - Best Explanation!

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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1
23

Human Physiology - Respiration 3/6 - Best Explanation!

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago
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1
18

Human Physiology - Respiration 4/6 - Best Explanation!

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
YouTube
almost 8 years ago