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73

Osteoporosis (Part I)

PART I The video describes the recent Prevalence, Risk Factors, Parthogenesis/Pathophysiology and Treatment options for Osteoporosis. I am only a Student (this is from my essay), Please comment and provide feedback~  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
E5b1099c7894a4783f2639a4069d6412c0c3b09e11976273255695069
10
2110

Osteoporosis Tutorial

The video describes the recent prevalence, risk factors, parthogenesis and treatment options for Osteoporosis.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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0
15

References that anyone can edit: review of Wikipedia citations in peer reviewed health science literature

Objectives To examine indexed health science journals to evaluate the prevalence of Wikipedia citations, identify the journals that publish articles with Wikipedia citations, and determine how Wikipedia is being cited.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
26

Paget's Disease of the Bone

Along with osteoporosis, this is a common degenerative bone disease   Epidemiology and Aetiology This is the second most common bone disorder (after osteoporosis), and affects >5% of the over 55’s in the UK. The prevalence varies between countries and races. The UK has the highest incidence. It is rare in Scandinavia, China and Japan. Increased incidence in Pet Owners Genetic susceptibility  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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1
21

Bullous Pemphigus

Bullous PemphiguS (superficial) Aetiology  Middle aged (40-60yrs)  High prevalence in Jewish regions  Lifelong condition   Pathophysiology  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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1
29

Haemophilia A

X-linked recessive condition, deficiency of factor VIII, prevalence 1 in 10,000 Range of possible mutations, 30% of cases due to sporadic mutation Low factor VIII levels predispose to bleeding – risk proportional to factor VIII level Mild disease (11-30 units/dl) risk after significant trauma/surgery Moderate disease (2-10 units) - minor trauma  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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2
42

Anxiety and Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) Epidemiology Very common. Prevalence: Men – 2-4% Women 3-4.5% Accounts for 1/3 of all psychiatric diagnosis Accounts for 10% of all GP consultations Closely related to depression – and many patients move between the two states. Often patients satisfy the criteria for both anxiety and depression  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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1
18

Giardiasis

Organism Giardia lamblia Flagellate protozoan – lives in duodenum or jejunum. Incubation= 7days-3months   Transmission Faecal-oral/ from pets or birds (humans are main reservoir of infection)   Typically from drinking water contaminated with giardia cysts (killed by boiling but NOT chlorination)   Epidemiology Prevalence approx. 20-30% in developing countries  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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9
214

COPD (Emphysema) Explained Clearly

Understand COPD (Emphysema) with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult. Includes discussion on the prevalence, symptoms, incentive spirometry, and diag...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
19

Prevention and management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care: summary of NICE guidance

Pressure ulcers are serious and distressing, and they can affect people of any age. Not only do they increase mortality, result in extended hospital stays, and consume substantial healthcare resources, they are often an example of avoidable harm. Reported prevalence rates range from 4.7% to 32.1% in hospital populations and as much as 22% in nursing home populations.1 Prevention of this devastating condition must be a priority for the NHS. Stage 1 pressure ulcers (see box for definition of stages) can be reversible if identified promptly, and most stage 2 and 3 ulcers can be healed with appropriate care, but all require a multidisciplinary approach for effective management. It is hoped that this guideline will help reduce pressure ulcers nationally and improve care when pressure ulcers do occur.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

Obesity, genetic risk, and environment

The alarming global rise in prevalence of obesity is caused by unhealthy obesogenic environments. In westernised societies we are all exposed to calorie dense food, sedentary lives, stress, and sleep deficit. Some people seem relatively insensitive to these environmental pressures, while others are severely affected and become obese.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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0
31

The Prevalence and Impact of Depression Among Medical Studen... : Academic Medicine

Purpose: This nationwide cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence, possible risk factors, and i  
journals.lww.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
30

Obesity, genetic risk, and environment

The alarming global rise in prevalence of obesity is caused by unhealthy obesogenic environments. In westernised societies we are all exposed to calorie dense food, sedentary lives, stress, and sleep deficit. Some people seem relatively insensitive to these environmental pressures, while others are severely affected and become obese.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
22

Prevention and management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care: summary of NICE guidance

Pressure ulcers are serious and distressing, and they can affect people of any age. Not only do they increase mortality, result in extended hospital stays, and consume substantial healthcare resources, they are often an example of avoidable harm. Reported prevalence rates range from 4.7% to 32.1% in hospital populations and as much as 22% in nursing home populations.1 Prevention of this devastating condition must be a priority for the NHS. Stage 1 pressure ulcers (see box for definition of stages) can be reversible if identified promptly, and most stage 2 and 3 ulcers can be healed with appropriate care, but all require a multidisciplinary approach for effective management. It is hoped that this guideline will help reduce pressure ulcers nationally and improve care when pressure ulcers do occur.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
36

Prevention and management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care: summary of NICE guidance

Pressure ulcers are serious and distressing, and they can affect people of any age. Not only do they increase mortality, result in extended hospital stays, and consume substantial healthcare resources, they are often an example of avoidable harm. Reported prevalence rates range from 4.7% to 32.1% in hospital populations and as much as 22% in nursing home populations.1 Prevention of this devastating condition must be a priority for the NHS. Stage 1 pressure ulcers (see box for definition of stages) can be reversible if identified promptly, and most stage 2 and 3 ulcers can be healed with appropriate care, but all require a multidisciplinary approach for effective management. It is hoped that this guideline will help reduce pressure ulcers nationally and improve care when pressure ulcers do occur.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
24

Prevention and management of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care: summary of NICE guidance

Pressure ulcers are serious and distressing, and they can affect people of any age. Not only do they increase mortality, result in extended hospital stays, and consume substantial healthcare resources, they are often an example of avoidable harm. Reported prevalence rates range from 4.7% to 32.1% in hospital populations and as much as 22% in nursing home populations.1 Prevention of this devastating condition must be a priority for the NHS. Stage 1 pressure ulcers (see box for definition of stages) can be reversible if identified promptly, and most stage 2 and 3 ulcers can be healed with appropriate care, but all require a multidisciplinary approach for effective management. It is hoped that this guideline will help reduce pressure ulcers nationally and improve care when pressure ulcers do occur.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
32

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
22

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
19

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
54

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago