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John Green on how he deals with obsessive-compulsive disorder and 'thought spirals'

Best-selling author John Green opens up to 60 Minutes about living with mental illness and how he copes with it. Sunday at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CBS. Subscribe to ...  
youtube.com
about 1 year ago
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Edward T. Hall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edward Twitchell Hall, Jr. (May 16, 1914 – July 20, 2009) was an American anthropologist and cross-cultural researcher. He is remembered for developing the concept of proxemics and exploring cultural and social cohesion, a and describing how people behave and react in different types of culturally defined personal space. Hall was an influential colleague of Marshall McLuhan and Buckminster Fuller.[1]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Franz Boas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Franz Uri Boas (/ˈfrɑːnz ˈboʊ.æz/; German: [ˈboːas]; July 9, 1858 – December 21, 1942)[2] was a German-American[3] anthropologist and a pioneer of modern anthropology who has been called the "Father of American Anthropology".[4][5] His work is associated with the movement of anthropological historicism.[6]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Joseph Conrad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Joseph Conrad (Polish pronunciation: [ˈjuz̪ɛf ˌkɔn.rad]; born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the greatest novelists to write in the English language.[1] He joined the British merchant marine in 1878, and was granted British nationality in 1886. Though he did not speak English fluently until he was in his twenties, he was a master prose stylist who brought a non-English sensibility into English literature.[note 1] He wrote stories and novels, many with a nautical setting, that depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of an impassive, inscrutable universe.[note 2]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) is an American interdisciplinary research organization at Stanford University, California, that offers a residential postdoctoral fellowship program for scientists and scholars—from the United States and abroad—studying "the five core social and behavioral disciplines of anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology".[1][2] It is one of the nine members of Some Institutes for Advanced Study (SIAS).  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Pain management - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pain management, pain medicine, pain control or algiatry, is a branch of medicine employing an interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those living with chronic pain[1] The typical pain management team includes medical practitioners, pharmacists, clinical psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurse specialists.[2] The team may also include other mental health specialists and massage therapists. Pain sometimes resolves promptly once the underlying trauma or pathology has healed, and is treated by one practitioner, with drugs such as analgesics and (occasionally) anxiolytics. Effective management of chronic (long-term) pain, however, frequently requires the coordinated efforts of the management team.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP)

Please note: Six unsuccessful login attempts will disable access to your account. In case of a lockout contact IASP by phone (+1-202-524-5300) or by email at iaspdesk@iasp-pain.org.  
iasp-pain.org
about 3 years ago
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International Association for the Study of Pain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) is an international learned society promoting research, education, and policies for the knowledge and management of pain. The IASP was founded in 1973 under the leadership of John Bonica.[1] Its secretariat, formerly based in Seattle, Washington is now located in Washington, DC. It publishes the scientific journal Pain.[2] IASP currently has more than 7,900 members from 133 countries and in 90 chapters.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Five Equity Questions Every Parent Must Ask During Back-to-School Night

Parents should understand what their child’s teacher and principal thinks about issues of educational equity in order to address the racial achievement gap.  
news.utexas.edu
about 3 years ago
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Dr. William B. Swann –

Bill Swann is a Professor of Social and Personality Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. His primary appointment is in the Social-Personality area of the Psychology Department, but he also has appointments in Clinical Psychology and in the School of Business. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and undergraduate degree from Gettysburg College. Bill has been a Fellow at Princeton University and at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He has also been elected a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. He has received multiple research scientist development awards from the National Institutes of Mental Health and research awards from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Mental Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. In 2010, he served as President of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. In 2016, he received the Distinguished Lifetime Career Award from the International Society for Self and Identity.  
labs.la.utexas.edu
about 3 years ago
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Scientists Engineer An Opioid That May Reduce Pain With Less Risk

Opioids lock to a receptor in the brain that controls pain relief, pleasure and need. A new compound may offer relief without as much risk of addiction or overdose. But it's only been tested in mice.  
npr.org
about 3 years ago
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Ayn Rand Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Ayn Rand Institute (ARI) is a nonprofit think tank in Irvine, California that promotes Objectivism, a philosophical system developed by author Ayn Rand. Its stated goal is to "spearhead a cultural renaissance that will reverse the anti-reason, anti-individualism, anti-freedom, anti-capitalist trends in today's culture".[2] The organization was established in 1985, three years after Rand's death, by Leonard Peikoff, Rand's legal heir. Its executive director is Yaron Brook.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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EXPERIENCE OF A MALE OB & GYN IN A MUSLIM CULTURE IN PAKISTAN.

As part of my post retirement ob & gyn activities, I spent two years in the early nineties, working at the Aga Kahn Medical School in Karachi, Pakistan. That is a most modern facility with excellent staff and resources and great medical students. One can imagine that the majority of obstetricians and gynecologists in a muslim country, like Pakistan, are female and that male ob & gyn might encounter some difficulties It was my distinct impression that often it is not the woman herself who objects to being examined and treated by a male, but rather the husband. An anecdote of a real situation which I encountered will illustrate this. One day I was sitting in my office next to the labor and delivery suite as one of the more junior female residents came running into my office, quite excited. “Doctor Le Maire, could you please come quickly? One of the laboring patients has some very major drop in the baby’s heartbeat. I am worried but cannot reach her private doctor and the doctor on call is in the operating room.” I ran over to the delivery suite with the resident and into the patient’s room. She was obviously in much discomfort and her husband was at her side. One of the first things an obstetrician may do when a woman in labor shows signs of some problem with the undelivered baby as evidenced by a drop in the baby’s heart rate, is to examine the woman vaginally. In doing so, the he or she can determine if the baby can be quickly delivered or if there is a reason for the drop in the baby’s heart rate, such as a loop of the umbilical cord being compressed by the head, in which case an immediate C- Section might be necessary. So I immediately put on a pair of sterile gloves and got ready to examine the woman. She herself was perfectly ready to let me do this, but her husband stopped me and told me that he objected to his wife being examined by a male. This was even in the face of a serious situation with potential for harm to his unborn baby. There was no time to be lost trying to reach one of the female attendings, so I did the next best thing and told the very junior resident to take the patient into the operating room and examine her there and let me know the findings, while I was getting the operating room organized to do a C-Section, if called for. The strange thing is that the husband would have let me do a C- Section on his wife, but not a vaginal exam. As it turned out, by the time the patient ended up in the operating room, her private doctor had been located and was in attendance. The outcome was good and a healthy baby was delivered soon after. However the situation could have been quite different and catastrophic. Even stranger to me was that the woman’s husband was not a lay person but actually a chief resident in anesthesiology in the same hospital, with whom I had worked together in the operating room on a number of occasions. I would never have thought that an educated person and a medically educated person at that, would jeopardize the well being of his unborn child and wife, based on cultural and religious beliefs. Later on in the year this same anesthesiology resident came to ask me for a letter of recommendation as he wanted to apply for a specialized fellowship in the USA. I hope that the reader can understand why I politely (perhaps not so politely) refused. Those interested can read more about my experiences in an e book, entitled "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path." One can down load it for free to the reader device of your choice from Smashwords at: http://smashwords.com/books/view/161522. Or just Google Crooscultural Doctoring.  
DR William LeMaire
about 3 years ago
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Getting blackout drunk: how alcohol can leave you with no memory of the night before

Blacking out from alcohol is a bit more complicated than you might think.  
zmescience.com
about 3 years ago
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We've finally discovered how birds can sleep and fly at the same time without crashing

Frigatebirds spend weeks at a time flying over oceans in search for food -- here's how they sleep during this time.  
zmescience.com
about 3 years ago
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List of psychiatric medications by condition treated - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of psychiatric medications used by psychiatrists to treat mental illness or distress. It is ordered alphabetically according to the condition or conditions each drug is used to treat, then by the generic name of each drug. The list is not exhaustive and not all drugs are used regularly in all countries.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Journal of Experimental Social Psychology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Journal of Experimental Social Psychology is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering social psychology. It is published by Elsevier on behalf of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology (SESP). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2012 impact factor of 2.219.[1]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Authoritarian personality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Authoritarian personality is a state of mind or attitude characterized by belief in absolute obedience or submission to one's own authority, as well as the administration of that belief through the oppression of one's subordinates. It usually applies to individuals who are known or viewed as having an authoritative, strict, or oppressive personality towards subordinates.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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Julian B. Rotter's Obituary on Hartford Courant

Julian B. Rotter, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Connecticut, died in his home on January 6, 2014. He was 97 years old. He is survived by his wife Doffie Hochreich Rotter,  
legacy.com
about 3 years ago
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UCL Press on the App Store

Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots, and learn more about UCL Press. Download UCL Press and enjoy it on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  
itunes.apple.com
about 3 years ago