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Hyena - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hyenas or hyaenas (from Greek ὕαινα hýaina[1]) are any feliform carnivoran mammals of the family Hyaenidae /haɪˈɛnᵻdiː/. With only four extant species, it is the fifth-smallest biological family in the Carnivora, and one of the smallest in the class Mammalia.[2] Despite their low diversity, hyenas are unique and vital components of most African ecosystems.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Harold Kelley - Alchetron, The Free Social Encyclopedia

Harold Kelley February 16 1921 January 29 2003 was an American social psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of California Los Ange  
alchetron.com
over 3 years ago
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American Association for the Advancement of Science - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an American international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity.[1] It is the world's largest general scientific society, with over 120,000 members,[2] and is the publisher of the well-known scientific journal Science, which had a weekly circulation of 138,549 in 2008.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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AAAS Prize for Behavioral Science Research - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The AAAS Prize for Behavioral Science Research was given by the American Association for the Advancement of Science to "further understanding of human psychological-social-cultural behavior". The award was presented starting in 1952 and last given in 1993.[1]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Stanley Schachter, Psychologist, 75. Columbia University Record, September 12, 1997

  "I don't think there was anybody who had as broad a palette or who allowed his imagination to range as freely," said Robert Krauss, professor of psychology at Columbia.  
columbia.edu
over 3 years ago
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Birth order - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Birth order refers to the order a child is born, for example first born, second born etc. Birth order is often believed to have a profound and lasting effect on psychological development. This assertion has been repeatedly challenged;[1] the largest multi-study research suggests zero or near-zero effects.[2] Birth-order theory has the characteristics of a zombie theory,[3] as despite disconfirmation,[2] it continues to have a strong presence in pop psychology and popular culture.[4][5]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Stanley Schachter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stanley Schachter (April 15, 1922 – June 7, 1997) was an American social psychologist, who is perhaps best known for his development of the two factor theory of emotion in 1962 along with Jerome E. Singer. In his theory he states that emotions have two ingredients: physiological arousal and a cognitive label. A person's experience of an emotion stems from the mental awareness of the body's physical arousal. Schachter also studied and published a large number of works on the subjects of obesity, group dynamics, birth order and smoking. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Schachter as the seventh most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[1]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Ethology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ethology is the scientific and objective study of animal behaviour, usually with a focus on behaviour under natural conditions, and viewing behaviour as an evolutionarily adaptive trait.[1] Behaviourism is a term that also describes the scientific and objective study of animal behaviour, usually referring to measured responses to stimuli or trained behavioural responses in a laboratory context, without a particular emphasis on evolutionary adaptivity.[2] Many naturalists have studied aspects of animal behaviour throughout history. Ethology has its scientific roots in the work of Charles Darwin and of American and German ornithologists of the late 19th and early 20th century, including Charles O. Whitman, Oskar Heinroth, and Wallace Craig. The modern discipline of ethology is generally considered to have begun during the 1930s with the work of Dutch biologist Nikolaas Tinbergen and by Austrian biologists Konrad Lorenz and Karl von Frisch, joint awardees of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.[3] Ethology is a combination of laboratory and field science, with a strong relation to some other disciplines such as neuroanatomy, ecology, and evolutionary biology. Ethologists are typically interested in a behavioural process rather than in a particular animal group, and often study one type of behaviour, such as aggression, in a number of unrelated animals.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Richard Herrnstein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Richard J. Herrnstein (May 20, 1930 – September 13, 1994) was an American researcher in animal learning in the Skinnerian tradition. He was one of the founders of the Society for Quantitative Analysis of Behavior.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Women in Psychology

1966-1979 Recieved numerous grants in two research areas (psychophysiology of autism and the development of parent training as a treatment for children with conduct disorder)  
psychology.okstate.edu
over 3 years ago
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IF YOU ARE AN EXPAT, AND ENGLISH IS NOT YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE , HAVE YOU HAD TROUBLE WITH IDIOMS?

TROUBLE WITH IDIOMS. After finishing medical school in Louvain Belgium, I came to Schenectady, NY in the US to do my internship. My knowledge of English was what I knew from my high school language classes. this translates into “very little practical knowledge”. At first I struggled but caught on fast (I had to). What did not come so fast was my understanding of the use of idioms. In earlier blogs I related my embarrassment with “pain in the neck” and “prick”. Here is an other one which at the time gave me a red face but now after so many years makes me chuckle. Anne and I lived in a small apartment close to the hospital and got by on a small, very small, salary (this was the late fifties). So did all the other interns. Therefore our entertainment consisted of pot-luck weekend evenings at each other’s apartments on a rotating basis. When it was our turn to host the get together we had told our friends to come around 8:00 pm. In Belgium this means arrival at the earliest around 8:15 or even later. Of course this is quite different in the punctual American culture. That evening the bell rang at 8:01 with the arrival of the first guests. I opened the door, sat them down, started the background music and offered them a drink, as other guests arrived. While they all were sipping their wine, whiskey, or soft drink, someone asked where Anne was. She was still getting ready, not expecting any one until sometime after 8 pm. I told them “Anne is taking a douche.” Now, a douche is actually the French word for shower and is also commonly used in the Dutch language, but of course in the English language that word has quite a different meaning. When I told everyone quite innocently, that Anne was taking a douche, people’s mouths fell open and I could see on their faces the disbelief and hidden thoughts …”what kind of party is this going to be?” A similar confusion occurred toward the end of our stay in Schenectady, when the student nurses, many of whom had befriended Anne, who was now in her first pregnancy, told me that they were planning to give her a baby shower. They asked me not to say anything and keep it as a surprise. However, I felt compelled to warn Anne that she was going to receive a gift of a shower for the baby, rather than a bath. I felt that I needed to prepare her for this unusual gift, as I knew that babies in Belgium are washed in a small bath and not in a shower. Of course we had a good laugh when we realized our misunderstanding. And so it goes!! If you want to read more and similar experiences you can read my book “Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path. You can download it for free from Smashwords at: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522. Our just google: Crosscultural Doctoring. I would love to hear about similar experiences from people, medical or non medical, around the world who have had difficulty with english idioms.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Time perception - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Time perception is a field of study within psychology and neuroscience that refers to the subjective experience of life: time, which is measured by someone's own perception of the duration of the indefinite and unfolding of events. The perceived time interval between two successive events is referred to as perceived duration. Another person's perception of time cannot be directly experienced or understood, but it can be objectively studied and inferred through a number of scientific experiments. Time perception is a construction of the brain that is manipulable and distortable under certain circumstances. These temporal illusions help to expose the underlying neural mechanisms of time perception.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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John Dewey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Dewey (/ˈduːi/; October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. Dewey is one of the primary figures associated with the philosophy of pragmatism and is considered one of the founders of functional psychology. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Dewey as the 93rd most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[2] A well-known public intellectual, he was also a major voice of progressive education and liberalism.[3][4] Although Dewey is known best for his publications about education, he also wrote about many other topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, art, logic, social theory, and ethics.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Home | European Association of Social Psychology

Official Website of the European Association of Social Psychology  
easp.eu
over 3 years ago
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Tinnitus severely affects person’s quality of life | PerfScience

A research paper published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery has unveiled that the rate of tinnitus is higher among Americans who are regularly exposed to noisy environments. Around one in 10 American adults face the problem of chronic tinnitus, a condition in which a person constantly have ringing or roaring in the ears or head.  
perfscience.com
over 3 years ago
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Edward de Bono - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edward de Bono (born 19 May 1933)[1] is a Maltese physician, psychologist, author, inventor and consultant. He originated the term lateral thinking, wrote the book Six Thinking Hats and is a proponent of the teaching of thinking as a subject in schools.[2]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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IEA: Home

Official Website of International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA)  
iea.nl
over 3 years ago
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Gilbert Austin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gilbert Austin (1753–1837) was an Irish educator, clergyman and author. Austin is best known for his 1806 book on chironomia, Chironomia, or a Treatise on Rhetorical Delivery. Heavily influenced by classical writers, Austin stressed the importance of voice and gesture to a successful oration.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Lee Cronbach, pioneer in education psychology, dead at 85 : 10/01

Lee J. Cronbach, an education professor who made major contributions in the fields of educational psychology and psychological testing during a career that spanned over five decades, died at age 85 on Oct. 1. Cronbach, who was the Vida Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus, passed away at his home in Palo Alto with his daughter, Janet, at his bedside. The cause of death was congestive heart failure.  
news.stanford.edu
over 3 years ago
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Robert M. Hauser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert Mason Hauser is an American sociologist. He is the Vilas Research and Samuel F. Stouffer professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where has served as director of the Institute for Research on Poverty and is director of the Center for Demography of Health and Aging.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago