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24
493

Gastroenterology Lecture

Gastrointestinal Disease Normal Anatomy and Physiology.  
SlideShare
over 5 years ago
Img0
21
697

Acute Abdominal Pain in Children

This tutorial covers the key facts in a child presenting with acute abdominal pain.  
Mr Raymond Buick
almost 11 years ago
29822
21
519

Therapeutic Drug Monitoring: An e-learning Resource

I created this e-learning resource during my first Undergraduate Pharmacology BSc degree and it was used as a teaching aid to explain fundamental Pharmacokinetic principles to scientists carrying out Therapeutic Drug Monitoring. Having studied aspects of Pharmacology during the first year of my Graduate Entry Medical Degree at the University of Leicester, myself and my colleagues have found this interactive learning tool a valuable resource. The easy to use and interactive nature of learning allows the user to navigate around the resource and also test their knowledge on questions at the end. The effectiveness of the resource and feedback received from users is published in the journal Bioscience Horizons and can be found at http://biohorizons.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/2/113.full.pdf+html.  
Krupa Samani
over 8 years ago
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21
1688

Trust Me, I'm a PA Student: Anatomy Tips and Tricks for Physician Assistant Students

So just a friendly fyi, most of this material was actually compiled/created by medical students from the Class of 2015 while they were TAing the PA and PT students. Many of these mnemonics and tips were handed down to them from prior years as well. I'm glad you found them helpful!  
doseofpa.blogspot.co.uk
almost 4 years ago
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20
671

Psychiatry Presentation

This is a powerpoint presentation I created on Psychiatry recently. All information is taken from NICE guidelines and MIMs guides. If any information is incorrect let me know! Pictures are from google. This was a bit of a slog to make truth be told and it is a LONG presentation, but I feel most of the information that is relevant to sitting final written exams is in there. I hope it helps!  
Conrad Hayes
over 6 years ago
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18
780

Back Pain

A short presentation looking at the epidemiology, pathology and treatment of back pain.  
James Harper
about 11 years ago
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18
279

Introducation to psychiatry

Brief introduction to psychiatry. This is aimed at medical students and junior doctors.  
Dr Jason Hancock
almost 9 years ago
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17
285

Embryology of the Head - a Computer Aided Learning (CAL) Package

A website created especially for healthcare students to encourage learning of embryology, malformation and its clinical implications. The package aims to: reinforce and build upon current healthcare curriculum content for embryological teaching of head development, to complement and enhance current teaching/learning/revision for relevant examination(s), to include interactive elements such as self-tests in order to improve learning and retention of knowledge, and finally, to illustrate aspects of malformation for diagnostic/clinical teaching purposes  
Amanda King
over 8 years ago
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17
390

Complications of Substance Misuse

Covers the main medical consequences of commonly misused substances.  
Harriet Blundell
almost 7 years ago
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17
447

Anxiety Disorders

An overview of Anxiety: Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Simple Phobia, Social Phobia, Agoraphobia, Panic Disorder and a general DDx of Anxiety symptoms.  
Harriet Blundell
almost 7 years ago
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17
190

Cultural Change Could Be Just What's Needed

Cultural change could be just what's needed All of us, at some time, will have experiences of being a patient. At such times we might feel vulnerable as we look to doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals for help and advice. While most of our experiences will be positive, a significant minority of us will experience difficulties in our interactions with healthcare professionals. For example last year, following a spate of similar reports across the UK, the Older People's Commissioner for Wales found consistent issues concerning the lack of dignity and respect patients received in hospital. These situations can cause real distress for patients, undermine the effectiveness of clinical treatment and sometimes impacts on how fast we might recover. I am interested in how this state of affairs comes about within an NHS that promotes respect, dignity and compassion for all. My research examines what happens to healthcare students during their training in clinical settings that means they sometimes have to be reminded that the person in front of them is a human who deserves compassion and respect. Today's healthcare students are explicitly taught about what comprises professional values and behaviours. However, a large part of learning to become a healthcare professional occurs within the NHS as they observe their seniors – who act as powerful role models – interacting with patients. Sometimes these role models were trained many years ago and belong to a different culture of medicine with different ways of doing things. People who belong to the same cultural group tend to embrace common characteristics such as language, customs and values. In doing this they embrace a common "cultural identity" and achieve a sense of belonging. Likewise, healthcare students tend to embrace common characteristics of their chosen profession. They look to their seniors for guidance about how to behave. But what if their seniors belong to a different era where things that were acceptable then may no longer be acceptable now? One strand of my research examines professionalism dilemma situations. These are situations in which healthcare students find themselves witnessing or participating in something unethical or unprofessional. These include witnessing, and sometimes participating in, breaches of patient safety and dignity. Students often report experiencing distress in such situations as they know the right way to behave, but feel unable to do so for some reason. In their stories, students frequently report feeling unable to speak out for fear of receiving poor grades as their seniors are also their teachers, because they are low in the pecking order or because speaking out might hamper their future career. So how can we support tomorrow's healthcare students to become ethical and compassionate professionals? Revalidation for doctors is coming into force and involves patient and colleague feedback. But our research suggests that, by itself, this is insufficient to change behaviours. We urge healthcare schools to provide students with a safe place to share their stories with each other and with ethical role models so they can begin to make sense of their experiences, share good practice and ways to resist bad practice. Most of all, we suggest that cultural change should occur from within. Patients, patient advocates, students and healthcare professionals should join together to examine how language, practices and values occurring within clinical settings can be developed to improve patient safety and dignity for all.  
Dr Lynn Monrouxe
almost 7 years ago
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17
902

How to Approach Chest Pain

Ahmed Zaafran MD presents clinical aspects of the chest pain including how to approach the chief complaint of chest pain.  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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16
229

Psychiatry for the ISCE

Psychiatry for the ISCE  
Dr Alastair Buick
over 5 years ago
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16
670

An Introduction to Pain [Nociceptors]

Hand drawn tutorial on Nociceptors.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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720

Exam Survival Guide

1. Sleep (I realize I’m posting this at 12:30 am…) (http://www.helpguide.org/life/sleep_tips.htm) I know there’s a popular perception of sleep deprivation going hand in hand with working hard or succeeding academically. However, that is only true if you’re working very last minute, and don’t care about retaining the information–you basically just want to get through your upcoming test/assignment. I would like to clarify that, although learning about 10 months of material in 2 weeks is overwhelming, it is NOT last minute because whatever you’re working on right now, you’ll have to remember in 2 weeks for your exam. Besides the exam, if you’re studying medicine, you need to remember most of these things for the rest of your life. In order to retain that information, you need to stay alert, well rested and motivated. Prolonged sleep deprivation can make you feel very ‘CBA’ very fast. 2. Stay Energized Sleep is only one factor in staying motivated and alert; another is staying energized¬–in a healthy way. Simply put: if you feel well, you’ll work well. Eat well: difficult, I know, when you’ve got so little time to spare; but as much as you can, try to eat more whole foods (aka things that don’t come in wrappers or have their own commercial) and keep a balanced diet (too much of anything is usually not good). Everyone snacks while they’re doing exams, but try to find a vice that won’t put you in a sugar coma (some good examples include berries and other fruits, nuts, carrots with hummus to dip in, granola bars, etc). Note: drinking tea is also an excellent way to stay energized! Stay active: Again, I know something like this is difficult to keep up in normal everyday life, let alone during exam stress. Even if it is just for 15-20 minutes, some cardio (note: the more strenuous the workout in a short period of time, the more benefit you’ll get) is a fantastic ‘eye-opener’ (I learned that phrase while learning how to take an alcohol history and now I really like it)! No one wants to go for a run in the morning, but after you get past the first 2-3 minutes of wanting to collapse, your body starts to feel really grateful. This is the BEST way to stimulate your senses and wake yourself up. I promise it’s better than any energy drink or cup of coffee you could have. Take small breaks: SMALL breaks!!! About 10 minutes. Every once in a while, you need to get up and walk around to give yourself a break, have some fresh air, grab a snack, but try not to get carried away; try to avoid having a short attention span. 3. Make Lists I cannot stress enough how counterproductive it is to overwhelm yourself with the amount of work you have. Whether you think about it or not, that pile is not going anywhere. Thinking about it won’t wish it away. Stop psyching yourself out and just get on with it– step by step. Making a list of objectives you need to accomplish that day or week is a great way to start; then, cross them out as you go along (such a satisfying feeling). Being able to visualize your progress will be a great motivator. Remember: it is important to be systematic with your studying approach; if you jump around between modules because they’re boring you’re just going to confuse yourself and make it hard to remember things when that exam comes Note: I have a white board in my room where I write my objectives for the week. Some days it motivates, some days it I want to throw it out the window (but I can't reach the latch)… 4. Practice Questions Practice questions are excellent for monitoring your progress; they’re also excellent at scaring you. Do not fear! This is a good thing, because now you know what you’re missing, go back and read up on what you forgot to take a look at, and come back and do the questions later. Then give yourself a sticker for getting it right ? Practice questions are also great for last minute studying too because they can help you do what I call “backwards studying”–which is what I just described: figuring out what you need to learn based on what the questions look like. 5. Be realistic Set realistic goals for yourself; most importantly, set realistic daily goals for yourself so that when you get all or most or even some of them done you can go to sleep with a level of satisfaction. Also, you need to pick your battles. Example: if you suck at neuro, then one module’s loss is another’s gain. Don’t spend too much time trying to get through one thing, just keep moving forward, and come back to it later 6. ‘Do not disturb’ Facebook, twitter, instagram, youtube, whatsapp, texting, pinterest, meme websites, so many fantastic ways to kill your time… Do yourself a favor, save them for your breaks. If someone is dying or on fire, they will most likely call you, not text you or write on your wall; you do not need to check your phone that often unless you're expecting something time sensitive. 7.Don’t Compare Everyone studying in your program is going to be stressed about things; do NOT let it rub off on you. You know those moments when you hear a peer or a prof/tutor describing something you have never even heard of, then you start panicking? Yeah, don’t do that. It happens to everyone. Instead of worrying so much, just go read about it! Simple solution right? What else are you going to do? Plus, a lot of the time other students seem to know more than they need to about certain things (which I can tell you right now, doesn’t always mean they’re doing better than you; knowing random, very specific factoids doesn’t mean they can bring it in clinic. Everyone can pull a Hermione and know a book inside out, but this is not necessarily the hallmark of a good doctor), what’s it to you? Worry about yourself, be confident in your abilities, and don’t trouble yourself with comparing to other people 8.Practice for Practicals Everyone is afraid of practical exams, like the OSCE (at any rest station you're likely to find me with my head in my hands trying to stabilize my breathing pattern and trying not to cry). The best way to be ready is to practice and practice and practice and practice. It’s like learning to drive a car. At first you’re too aware of your foot on the gas, the position of your hand on the wheel, etc; but, after driving for a little while, these things become subconscious. In the same way, when you walk into a station, you could be so worried about how you’ll do your introduction and gain consent, and remembering to wash your hands, and getting equipment and and and and and; the anxiety affects your confidence and your competence. If you practice enough, then no matter what they throw at you, you will get most of the points because the process will be second nature to you. Practice on your roommates, friends, family members, patients with a doctor's help...when appropriate... Even your stuffed animals if you're really desperate. DO NOT leave practicing for these practicals to the last minute; and if you do, make sure you go through every thing over and over again until you’re explaining examinations in your sleep. NOTE: When I'm practicing for OSCE alone, I record myself over and over again and play it back to myself and criticize it, and then practice againn. 9.Consistency You don’t necessarily have to study in the same place every day; however, it is always good to have some level of routine. Some examples include: waking up/sleeping at the same time everyday, going for a run at the same time every day, having the same study routine, etc. Repetition is a good way to keep your brain focused on new activities because, like I said before, the more you repeat things, the more they become second nature to you. Hope these tips are of some use to you; if not, feel free to sound off in the comments some alternate ways to get through exams. Remember that while exams are stressful, this is the time where you build your character and find out what you’re truly capable of. When you drop your pen after that final exam, you want to feel satisfied and relieved, not regretful. Happy Studying ?  
Mary
over 6 years ago
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16
750

Generalized anxiety disorder

Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
Preview
16
583

Emotional intelligence

What is Emotional Intelligence? 1. Self-awareness. 2. Managing Emotions. 3. Motivation 4. Empathy. 05- Handling relationships How To Develop A Higher Sense Of …  
slideshare.net
almost 4 years ago
Preview
15
756

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

An overview of ADHD  
Harriet Blundell
almost 7 years ago
Preview
15
278

Emotions: Limbic System

Learn about the key structures of the limbic structure and how they play a role in experiencing emotion.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Dfc77f46cc4e956b60bfaea2de3ea0e3f75978178736753401701532
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2857

Developmental Milestones Lecture

A quick run through the developmental milestones of children, how to assess them, and diagnosis of delay.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago