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Mosby's Pathophysiology Memory NoteCards

Mosby's Pathophysiology Memory NoteCards - Free ebook download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read book online for free.  
Scribd
over 4 years ago
9a7e926cb48ef90f93ec22a1242c34a6d10426dd3316335090367415
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Stroke Syndromes part1

The stroke syndromes. most common is middle cerebral artery. Key Loc=loss of consciousness Bulb= memory Spiral= confusion These are intact in MCA..only in ACA memory is affected hence the bulb is crossed out. Divide the body in 4 boxes representing upper and lower limbs and each box is further divided into S (sensory) M (Motor). The dark shading means this is affected more. Dotted shading means affected to a lesser extent. Note how sensory is intact (not shaded) in webers and benedict . The red dot in brain = site of infarction The 2 circles represent visual field. ( intact in ACA). Only ACA has urinary incontinence (shown by leaking urine) Note. For Benedict. .Ataxia is shown by shading under the legs on one side (although legs are represented by boxes the stick lines as legs is only used to represent ataxia). tip..whenever faced with an infarct question draw the man and symbols shown and shade accordingly. Will definitely help diagnose the case quickly.  
Sarosh Kamal
about 4 years ago
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14
202

Thyroid Hormone Production

http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial takes a look at the production of thyroid hormones in the Thyroid Gland. This includes the transport of iodine and the production of thyroglobulin in the Thyroid Follicles. For more entirely FREE tutorials and accompanying PDFs visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com  
Handwritten Tutorial Videos
over 5 years ago
Preview
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225

Psychiatry Handout

Psychiatry Handout for SW revision course  
Dr Alastair Buick
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 mtoqpd?1444774202
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1238

How to Write a Resume: Tips for Medical Students

It is understandable why resume writing is daunting for most students – they haven’t achieved many significant things at such young age and they have difficulties to present usual things as something extraordinary. However, you shouldn’t give up on your efforts, because you will be surprised by all things your potential employers consider valuable. All you have to do is find the right way to demonstrate your achievements and relate them to the job you are applying for. The following tips will help you write a great resume that will represent you as an ideal candidate for every employer. 1. Start the process by listing your experiences. You cannot tackle the challenge right where it gets most difficult, so you should gradually work your way towards the precise professional language. Start with brainstorming and create a list of all experiences you consider significant. You can draw experiences from all life aspects, such as school, academic activities, internships, prior employments, community service, sports, and whatever else you consider important. Look at that list and distinguish the most motivating experiences that led you to the point where you currently are. 2. Target the resume towards the job. Sending the same generic resume to all potential employers is a common mistake students do. You should tailor a custom-written resume for each job application, representing experiences and skills that will be relevant for the position you’re applying for. 3. Present yourself as a dynamic person. Find the most active components of your experiences and present them in the resume. Focus on action verbs, because they are attention-grabbing and make powerful statements (trained, evaluated, taught, researched, organized, led, oriented, calculated, interviewed, wrote, and so on). 4. Mark the most notable elements of your experiences and use them to start your descriptions. An employer couldn’t care less about the mundane aspects of college or internships, so feel free to leave them out and highlight your persona as a professional who would be a great choice for an employee. 5. Show what you can do for the organization. Employers are only looking for candidates who can contribute towards the growth of their companies, so make sure to portray yourself as someone who can accomplish great things in the role you are applying for. You can do this by reviewing your experiences and highlighting any success you achieved, no matter how small it is. 6. Don’t forget that your most important job at the moment is being a student. While you’re a student, that’s the most important aspect of your life and you should forget to mention that you are an engaged learner in your resume. Include the high GPA and the achievements in your major as important information in your resume. 7. Describe the most important academic projects. At this stage of life, you don’t have many professional experiences to brag about, but your academic projects can also be included in your resume because they show your collaborative, critical thinking, research, writing, and presentation skills. 8. Present yourself as a leader. If you were ever engaged as a leader in a project, make sure to include the information about recruiting and organizing your peers, as well as training, leading, and motivating them. 9. Include information about community service. If all students knew that employers appreciate community service as an activity that shows that the person has matured and cares for the society, they wouldn’t underestimate it so much. Make sure to include information about your activities as a volunteer – your potential employers will definitely appreciate it. 10. Review before you submit! Your resume will require some serious reviewing before you can send it safely to employers. This isn’t the place where you can allow spelling and grammatical errors to slip through. The best advice would be to hire a professional editor to bring this important document to perfection. One of the most important things to remember is that writing a great resume requires a lot of time and devotion. Make sure to follow the above-listed steps, and you will make the entire process less daunting.  
Robert Morris
over 5 years ago
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39

How To Calm A Crying Baby - Dr. Robert Hamilton Demonstrates "The Hold" (Official)

Dr. Hamilton, a pediatrician in Santa Monica, CA shows how to calm a crying baby using "The Hold". SUBSCRIBE to channel for more baby content! This technique...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
A3c989d57d42d4a387ef66aabd26a4f9b0f23ec3021604293783491713
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2644

What Is It Like to Be a Baby: The Development of Thought

This lecture explores issues and ideas related to the branch of psychology known as cognitive development. It begins with an introduction of Piaget who, interested in the emergence of knowledge in general, studied children and the way they learn about the world in order to formulate his theories of cognitive development.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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13
201

Alzheimer's Disease

An overview of Alzheimer's Disease  
Harriet Blundell
over 6 years ago
248859237eeeeba21c77e9b3814a21d45f9c397a5889843568190867
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Major Functions of the Hypothalamus by Professor Fink

Learn about the Thermoregulatory Reflex Center, the Appetite/Satiety Reflex Center, Osmoregulatory (Thirst) Reflex Center and the Parturition/Milk Let-Down Reflex Center.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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13
215

Communication skills

Communication skills for SW revision course  
Dr Alastair Buick
over 5 years ago
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77

Female Genital Mutilation for Healthcare Professionals

This booklet is a learning resource provided at the National Educational Conference on female genital mutilation (FGM) organised in Exeter in February 2011 and is relevant to the learning of a wide range of healthcare professionals, including medical students, doctors and midwives. It aims to provide key summary points, both from the lectures on the day and guidelines published to date, in order to aid recognition and management of cases of female genital mutilation.  
Eleanor Zimmermann
over 8 years ago
30288
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Catherine Power's Examination of the Breasts

Catherine Power explains how to perform an examination of the breasts.  
Ronak Ved
about 7 years ago
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Anxiety Disorders

summary of anxiety disorders: presentation and treatment  
Aoibhin McGarrity
almost 7 years ago
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236

Bipolar Affective Disorder, Depression and Suicide

Summary of these 3 key topics in psychiatry  
Aoibhin McGarrity
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1vfzxkt?1444774033
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My Top 5 Tips to Use Social Media to Improve your Medical Education

Introduction Hello and welcome! I am finally back to blogging after having a brief hiatus in order to take my final exams. Whilst the trauma is still fresh in my mind, I would like to share with you the top 5 social media tips that helped me through the dark days of undergraduate medicine. Some of you may have already read my old essay on 'How Medical Students should interact with Social Media Networking Sites' and this document deals with some of the problems with professionalism surrounding the use of social media. This blog will not cover such issues, but will instead focus on how you can use social media to benefit your learning/ revision processes. Top Tip 1: YouTube For those of you who are unaware, YouTube is a video-sharing website. Sometimes the site is overlooked as a 'social media' resource but if you consider the simple definition of Social Networking Sites as 'those with user led content,' you can quickly see how YouTube definitely falls into the social media category. It wasn't until I got to University that I realised the potency of YouTube as an educational tool. It has a use at every stage of medical education and it is FREE. If you are still in your pre-clinical training then there are a wealth of videos that depict cellular processes and 3D anatomy - very useful content for the visual learner. For the clinical student, there are a number of OSCE demonstration videos that may be useful in honing your examination skills. There are also a number of presentations on clinical topics that have been uploaded, however, YouTube has no quality control measures for these videos (to my knowledge) so it may be best to subscribe to a more official source if you like to use podcasts/ uploaded presentations for your revision. Another reason YouTube comes in as my number 1 top tip is because I find it difficult to procrastinate whilst using the site. Sure, you can start looking up music and videos that have nothing to do with medicine but personally I find that having a little bit of music on in the background helps me work for longer periods, which is a definite bonus during the revision period. On the other hand, there are many that find YouTube difficult to harness due to the draw of funny videos and favourite Vloggers (Video Bloggers) that can distract the unwary from revision for hours on end. At the end of the day, YouTube was created for funny videos (predominantly of cats it seems) and not for medical education, and this should be kept in mind if you choose to use it as a tool for your learning. Top Tip 2: Facebook Yes, the dreaded Facebook comes in at number two for me. Facebook is by far and away my largest source of procrastination when it comes to writing / working / revising or learning. It is a true devil in disguise, however, there are some very useful features for those who like to work in groups during their revision... For example, during the last six months I have organised a small revision group through Facebook. We set up a 'private page' and each week I would post what topics would be covered in the weeks session. Due to the nature of Facebook, people were obviously able to reply to my posts with suggestions for future topics etc. We were also able to upload photos of useful resources that one or more of us had seen in a tutorial in which the other students hadn't been able to attend. And most importantly, we were able to upload revision notes for each other via the Facebook 'files' tab. This last feature was invaluable for sharing basic notes between a few close colleagues. However, for proper file sharing I strongly recommend the file sharing service 'Dropbox,' which provides free storage for your documents and the ability to access files from any computer or device with internet. Coming back to Facebook, my final thoughts are: if you don't like group work or seeing what your colleagues are doing via their statuses or private messages then it probably isn't a useful resource for you. If you have the motivation (unlike myself) to freeze your Facebook account I can imagine you would end up procrastinating far less (or you'll start procrastinating on something else entirely!). Top Tip 3: Twitter Twitter is a microblogging site. This means that users upload microblogs or 'Tweets' containing useful information they have found on the internet or read in other people's tweets. Twitter's utility as an educational resource is directly related to the 'type' of people you follow. For example, I use Twitter primarily to connect with other people interested in social media, art & medicine and medical education. This means my home screen on twitter is full of people posting about these topics, which I find useful. Alternatively, I could have used my Twitter account to 'follow' all the same friends I 'follow' on Facebook. This would have meant my Twitter home page would have felt like a fast-paced, less detailed version of my Facebook feed just with more hashtags and acronyms - not very useful for finding educational resources. With this in mind, consider setting up two twitter accounts to tease apart the useful tweets about the latest clinical podcast from the useless tweets about what your second cousin once removed just had for lunch. A friend suggested to me that if you really get into twitter it is also possible to use one account and 'group' your followers so that you can see different 'types' of tweets at different times. This seems like a good way to filter the information you are reading, as long as you can figure out how to set up the filters in the first place. Like all Social Media Sites, Twitter gets its fair share of bad press re. online professionalism and its tendency to lure users into hours of procrastination. So again, use with caution. Top Tip 4: Meducation It would not be right to write this blog and not include Meducation in the line-up. Meducation is the first website that I have personally come across where users (students, doctors etc) upload and share information (i.e. the very soul of what social networking is about) that is principally about medicine and nothing else. I'm sure there may be other similar sites out there, but the execution of this site is marvellous and that is what has set it apart from its competitors and lead to its rapid growth (especially over the last two years, whilst i've been aware of the site). When I say 'execution,' I mean the user interface (which is clean and simple), the free resources (giving a taste of the quality of material) and the premium resources (which lecture on a variety of interesting clinical topics rather than sticking to the bread and butter topics 24/7). One of my favourite features of Meducation is the ability to ask 'Questions' to other users. These questions are usually asked by people wishing to improve niche knowledge and so being able to answer a question always feels like a great achievement. Both the questions and answers are mostly always interesting, however the odd question does slip through the net where it appears the person asking the question might have skipped the 'quick google search' phase of working through a tough topic. Meducation harnesses social networking in an environment almost free from professionalism and procrastination issues. Therefore, I cannot critique the site from this angle. Instead, I have decided to highlight the 'Exam Room' feature of the website. The 'Exam Room' lets the user take a 'mock exam' using what I can only assume is a database of questions crafted by the Meducation team themselves (+/- submissions from their user base). However, it is in my opinion that this feature is not up to scratch with the level and volume of questions provided by the competitors in this niche market. I feel wrong making this criticism whilst blogging on Meducation and therefore I will not list or link the competitors I am thinking of here, but they will be available via my unaffiliated blog (Occipital Designs). I hope the Meducation team realise that I make this observation because I feel that with a little work their question database could be improved to the point where it is even better than other sites AND there would also be all the other resources Meducation has to offer. This would make Meducation a truly phenomenal resource. Top Tip 5: Blogging Blogging itself is very useful. Perhaps not necessarily for the learning / revision process but for honing the reflective process. Reflective writing is a large component of undergrad medical education and is disliked by many students for a number of reasons, not least of which is because many find some difficulty in putting their thoughts and feelings on to paper and would much prefer to write with the stiffness and stasis of academic prose. Blogging is great practice for breaking away from essay-writing mode and if you write about something you enjoy you will quickly find you are easily incorporating your own personal thoughts and feelings into your writing (as I have done throughout this blog). This is a very organic form of reflection and I believe it can greatly improve your writing when you come to write those inevitable reflective reports. Conclusion Thanks for reading this blog. I hope I have at least highlighted some yet unharnessed aspects of the sites and resources people already commonly use. Please stay tuned in the next week or two for more on social media in medicine. I am working together with a colleague to produce 'Guidelines for Social Media in Medicine,' in light of the recent material on the subject by the General Medical Council. Please feel free to comment below if you feel you have a Top Tip that I haven't included! LARF Twitter Occipital Designs My Blog As always, any views expressed here are mine alone and are not representative of any organisation. A Worthy Cause... Also, on a separate note: check out Anatomy For Life - a charity medical art auction raising money for organ donation. Main Site Facebook Twitter  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 6 years ago
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282

Mental Health in Medical Students: Challenges and Opportunities

Objectives: Identify common mental health problems seen in medical students nationally. Describe approaches to improving medical student mental health.  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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1387

What's the Difference Between Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia?

FreeDem Videos Hope to Boost Ireland's Brain Health and Tackle Fears About Memory Loss 10 quirky animated videos addressing common concerns about memory loss...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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225

Prescribing for pain in palliative care

Short powerpoint and example cases for simple pain prescribing in palliative care  
Katie Dumble
over 10 years ago
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Interactive Learning Resource - MCQ website

The site contains an extensive range of MCQs and “fill in the blank” style questions for years one through to five of my Medical degree at Leeds. The site can be viewed here; http://mcqs.leedsmedics.org.uk The site proved to be very popular. It has had over 18,000 page loads in the last month, with an average of 244 visitors per day. I decided to extend it so that it could provide a wider range of information source for medical students. I did this by approaching the MSRC as I felt that they could benefit greatly from a website. The resulting website now contains a wealth of study resources, links to other student groups, and links to useful information sources (e.g. finance, accommodation, personal support). The site also keeps medical students up to date with news around the medical school and provides a port of call for those wishing to contact members of the MSRC or buy ‘Leeds Medics’ tops from an ethical supplier. This site has also proved to be very popular, with over 4000 page loads in the last month and an average of 77 unique visitors per day. It also gives potential medical students a professional looking point of contact with current students at Leeds. I have now finished my final exams, but I have handed over instructions for how the site can be managed and updated to the IT Rep in the MSRC and hope that it will continue to provide a useful resource for students studying medicine for years to come. The site can be viewed here; http://msrc.leedsmedics.org.uk, and the section with MCQs can be viewed here; http://mcqs.leedsmedics.org.uk  
brian mcmillan
over 8 years ago
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Muscle Power and Tone Examination

Guide to doing a clinical exam on muscle, power and tone by the clinical skills tutors at the University of Liverpool  
Mary
almost 7 years ago