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6
153

Thyroid Hormone Production

This tutorial takes a look at the production of thyroid hormones in the Thyroid Gland.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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6
397

Visual Field Defects

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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191

Testosterone Production

This animation represents a visual interpretation of the production of testosterone and is not indicative of clinical effectiveness.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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176

Blood Supply to the Brain - Animation and Narration by Cal Shipley, M.D.

A review of the blood supply (vascular anatomy) to the human brain. Produced and narrated by Cal Shipley, M.D. http://www.trialimage.com  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1o5bbyd?1444774101
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319

Student Credits for Contributing to Online Content

I have some very exciting news to share with you today - the University of California (UC) in San Francisco will become the first medical school to give academic credit to students for editing content on Wikipedia. Wikipedia has had a tempestuous history in academia. It was originally considered to be a very unreliable source until it was shown to be as accurate as the Encyclopaedia Britannica in 2005. Since then it has been gaining recognition among both students and academics as a reliable and important part of the research phase. Wikipedia acts as a base upon which further research can be built - its strong focus and policies surrounding citation mean that it’s easy to dig deeper into the information it provides. It’s brilliant to see that institutions are now recognising not only the value of using Wikipedia, but also the importance of contributing back to it and the value the service provides to both the student and the reader. Like me, you're probably wondering how this will work. Well, students will be given the opportunity to improve commonly used but lower quality Wikipedia articles. Professors will then give credits based on the quality of each student's contribution to the article. Not only will it enhance the quality of online medical resources, it will also encourage collaborative working which will, in turn, lead to innovative thinking and advances in medicine. This progress is such great news for the future of medical education. I can’t wait for the day Meducation Authors are rewarded with credits for the amazing content they give to us! As Charles Darwin once said “In the long history of humankind (and animal kind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed.”  
Nicole Chalmers
about 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 dd0lu2?1444774205
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220

Male Postnatal Depression - a sign of equality or a load of nonsense?

Storylines on popular TV dramas are a great way of raising the public's awareness of a disease. They're almost as effective as a celebrity contracting an illness. For example, when Wiggles member Greg Page quit the group because of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, I had a spate of patients, mostly young and female, coming in with self-diagnosed "Wiggles Disease". A 30% increase in the number of mammograms in the under-40s was attributed to Kylie Minogue's breast cancer diagnosis. The list goes on. Thanks to a storyline on the TV drama Desperate Housewives, I received questions about male postnatal depression from local housewives desperate for information: "Does it really exist?" "I thought postnatal depression was to do with hormones, so how can males get it?" "First it's male menopause, now it's male postnatal depression. Why can't they keep their grubby mitts off our conditions?" "It's like that politically correct crap about a 'couple' being pregnant. 'We' weren't pregnant, 'I' was. His contribution was five seconds of ecstasy and I was landed with nine months of morning sickness, tiredness, stretch marks and sore boobs!" One of my patients, a retired hospital matron now in her 90s, had quite a few words to say on the subject. "Male postnatal depression -- what rot! The women's liberation movement started insisting on equality and now the men are getting their revenge. You know, dear, it all began going downhill for women when they started letting fathers into the labour wards. How can a man look at his wife in the same way if he has seen a blood-and-muck-covered baby come out of her … you know? Men don't really want to be there. They just think they should -- it's a modern expectation. Poor things have no real choice." Before I had the chance to express my paucity of empathy she continued to pontificate. "Modern women just don't understand men. They are going about it the wrong way. Take young couples who live with each other out of wedlock and share all kind of intimacies. I'm not talking about sex; no, things more intimate than that, like bathroom activities, make-up removal, shaving, and so on." Her voice dropped to a horrified whisper. "And I'm told that some young women don't even shut the door when they're toileting. No wonder they can't get their de facto boyfriends to marry them. Foolish girls. Men need some mystery. Even when you're married, toileting should definitely be kept private." I have mixed feelings about male postnatal depression. I have no doubt that males can develop depression after the arrival of a newborn into the household; however, labelling it "postnatal depression" doesn't sit all that comfortably with me. I'm all for equality, but the simple fact of the matter is that males and females are biologically different, especially in the reproductive arena, and no amount of political correctness or male sharing-and-caring can alter that. Depressed fathers need to be identified, supported and treated, that goes without saying, but how about we leave the "postnatal" tag to the ladies? As one of my female patients said: "We are the ones who go through the 'natal'. When the boys start giving birth, then they can be prenatal, postnatal or any kind of natal they want!" (This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor http://bit.ly/1aKdvMM)  
Dr Genevieve Yates
almost 6 years ago
969ce9085dc7bad362680c68e5d115059f679b3d06074364700822077
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260

Headaches: History, Examination, Management

This slideshow covers history taking and examination and management of headaches  
Nicholas Shannon
over 4 years ago
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31

'Expensive' and 'incoherent' healthcare regulation needs 'radical overhaul'

Healthcare regulation in the UK  is “incoherent”, “expensive” and requires a “radical overhaul” according to a review by the body which oversees the work of organisations including the Nursing and Midwifery Council.  
nursingtimes.net
over 4 years ago
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Data suggest low vaccine exemption rates, but more granular data are needed

Parents of children in kindergarten in general are seeking exemptions from vaccination requirements for 1.7% of this population.  
pediatricnews.com
about 4 years ago
Caduceus folk helix pedigree
6
121

Androgen insensitivity syndrome

Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a condition that affects sexual development before birth and during puberty. People with this condition are genetically male, with one X chromosome and one Y chromosome in each cell. Because their bodies are unable to respond to certain male sex hormones (called androgens), they may have mostly female sex characteristics or signs of both male and female sexual development.  
ghr.nlm.nih.gov
about 4 years ago
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172

Ear Function & Hearing Mechanism

Notes: Here we have three middle bones again. The arm of the malleus is attached to the eardrum, and the footplate of the stapes is attached to the oval window of the cochlea (inner ear). What they are doing is they transmit vibrations of the eardrum into the cochlea. But here we have a problem. Because the impedance of air and impedance of liquid is really different. Which one is bigger? Impedance in the liquid is much bigger than that of air.  
ssc.education.ed.ac.uk
about 4 years ago
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269

Brains, Bodies, and Behavior

The nervous system is composed of more than 100 billion cells known as neurons . A neuron is a cell in the nervous system whose function it is to receive and transmit information . As you can see in Figure3.2, “Components of the Neuron” , neurons are made up of three major parts: a cell body, or soma , which contains the nucleus of the cell and keeps the cell alive ; a branching treelike fiber known as the dendrite , which collects information from other cells and sends the information to the soma ; and a long, segmented fiber known as the axon , which transmits information away from the cell body toward other neurons or to the muscles and glands .  
peoi.org
almost 4 years ago
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5
118

Teaching Project: Schizophrenia

A presentation on Schizophrenia I did to my GP placement fellow students and our GP tutor. It involved a powerpoint presentation, discussion in pairs, whiteboard work, interactive work with the presentation and watching a video.  
ROSEMARY KING
over 8 years ago
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Ethics of Screening Programmes and Treating Asylum Seekers - video

This video consists of two short films, addressing 1) the ethics of screening programes, and 2) the moral and legal issues associated with treating asylum seekers in the NHS. Alex Presland & Aliya Bryce  
Alex Presland
over 8 years ago
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73

Respiratory Presentation

I've made this quite recently. Again as for the others information is credited to the NICE and SIGN guidelines. I have taken some information from the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine too. Any and all pictures are from google. Downloading the file may be a good option so you can see the notes at the bottom of slides (same goes for my cardiology and psychiatry presentation). Feedback is appreciated!  
Conrad Hayes
over 6 years ago
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84

Renal Physiology (cont.)

Professor Saltzman continues his description of nephron anatomy, and the specific role of each part of the nephron in establishing concentration gradients to help in secretion and reabsorption of water, ions, nutrients and wastes. A number of molecular transport processes that produces urine from the initial ultra-filtrate, such as passive diffusion by concentration difference, osmosis, and active transport with sodium-potassium ATPase, are listed. Next, Professor Saltzman describes a method to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using tracer molecule, inulin. He then talks about regulation of sodium, an important ion for cell signaling in the body, as an example to demonstrate the different ways in which nephrons maintain homeostasis.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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Neurodegenerative Disorders Part I - Dementia, Alzheimer's, MND, MS

A very introduction to the Pathophysiology of some Neurodegenerative disorder. Song by: Angus and Julia stone - Devils tears  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago