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PublicHealth

Category

D9ea7ae40b4193e9c3a8c3d364ac26fab87bc4ed17366539529711744
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3810

Emergency Drugs and Calculations

This slideshow covers calculating Dopamine, Dobutamine, Levophed, Nitroglycerine and lots more.  
slideshare.net
over 3 years ago
Preview
41
1718

SEPSIS: Emergency LECTURE made simple in HD!

Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome or SIRS.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
6fa1ef00c96d094fc8d42acd9a15ac89d7acd8ba29431479917700776
23
3170

Epidemiology Notes

A brief presentation of basic epidemiology.  
SlideShare
over 5 years ago
Preview
23
909

Do More Screening Tests Lead to Better Health?

Hi, my name is DR. Mike Evans... I'm wondering if more screening tests are better?  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
Preview
21
1852

Epidemiology Statistics Tutorial

Odds ratio can mislead if a "Common Event" is studied, since it can exaggerate effects. Relative risk is appropriate for randomized control studies and cohort studies.  
HelpHippo.com
over 5 years ago
D9125fec1477e59d60d76dafc76dde19e75f284537625312129371147
21
3945

Primary Survey to Trauma Patients

The approach to trauma differs from other complaints in that so much can be injured, those injuries can be severe and much of it can be difficult to detect. So we need a systematic approach to these patients.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Epi study types rew
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Types of Epidemiology Studies

Great flow chart to help you understand how study types are classified. Each type is then discussed individually so you can learn more about its purpose.  
cisncancer.org
almost 4 years ago
Preview
18
1693

Quick Neurological Screening Examination

A demonstration of a CNS screening examination.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
D525512460acf883a6150fae9403ebd508e193719745937056893971
18
3476

How to Choose the Appropriate Statistical Test

A step-by-step approach for choosing an appropriate statistical test for data analysis.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
17
390

Complications of Substance Misuse

Covers the main medical consequences of commonly misused substances.  
Harriet Blundell
almost 7 years ago
30107
14
286

Mneumonics/Acronyms for Population Health and Evidence-Based Practice

Some easy methods to remember: - the definition of 'Epidemiology' and 'Public Health'. - what are Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary disease prevention. - the Bradford-Hill criteria for disease causation.  
David Jones
almost 8 years ago
Preview
13
220

Administration of oxygen

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to deliver oxygen therapy through various devices, as well as the prescribing of oxygen.<br>It is part of a series of videos covering Respiratory Medicine skills.<br><br>Please see the BTS guidelines for more information:<br><a href="http://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/guidelines/emergency-oxygen-use-in-adult-patients.aspx" target="_blank" title="http://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/guidelines/emergency-oxygen-use-in-adult-patients.aspx" rel="nofollow" dir="ltr" class="yt-uix-redirect-link">http://www.brit-thoracic.org.uk/guidelines/emergency-oxygen-use-in-adult-pati...</a>  
Hussam Rostom
about 7 years ago
Preview
11
349

Commonly missed Fractures

Cases with Xrays and Questions Fractures that even Emergency doctors miss. Don't forget to examine soft tissues!  
Anna-Maria Paes
almost 7 years ago
Preview
11
180

Sensitivity and Specificity

Easily understand the concepts of SENSITIVITY and SPECIFICITY! These two words can be confusing when you are first learning the basics of biostatistics.  
youtu.be
over 3 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1h2uz50?1444773915
10
191

The Growth Of Online Medical Education Resources

Introduction Over the last three years there has been a rapid increase in the amount of medical education resources on the web. The contributors tend to fall into three main areas: Individuals or small groups producing material Large organisations / universities producing material Organisations creating sites (such as Meducation) which are one-stop-shops for content and act as a portal for other sites. Individuals Most students are required to produce and present a certain amount of educational material during their studies. Many, therefore, end up with PowerPoints and documents on various topics. The more ambitious may create videos: either animations in flash, or more real-life videos that demonstrate something such as an examination technical. Some of these students enjoy this so much that they have developed sites dedicated to such material. Sites such as Podmedics and Surgery and Medicine are examples of students who have grouped together to upload their work to a central place where it can be shared in the community. They advertise on Facebook and Twitter and gain a small following. Large Organisations And Universities Some organisations have realised that there is a market for the production of multimedia resources and have invested time and money into producing them. Companies such as MD Kiosh and ORLive run subscription services for high quality videos and have developed full time businesses around this work. Universities have also realised the potential for creating high quality media and some, such as the University of California and the University of Wisconsin, have invested into television-like streams, trying to tap in to the students natural viewing habits. As time goes on it seems likely that most medical education will move away from textbooks and towards the multimedia resources. There will always be a need for the written word but it is likely that it will become more incorporated into other forms of media, such as presentations and annotated videos. One-Stop-Shops The final, and possibly most influential type of contributor is the social network / portal site. Here, all the information from around the web is culminated in one place, where users can go to find what they are looking for These sites act as portals for all the other types of site and help spread their reach well beyond their local community. Here at Meducation, we have contributors from over 100 countries and pride ourselves on making easy-to-find resources for everyone. As time goes on and more users start to discover portal sites, more traffic will flood to the sites they support and the whole infrastructure can grow incrementally.  
Jeremy Walker
almost 10 years ago
Preview
9
220

Epidemiology

Note summaries of the basics of epidemiology  
Philip Welsby
over 8 years ago
Preview
9
187

Oncological Emergencies

ONCOLOGY EMERGENCIES  
Stephen McAleer
over 6 years ago
Preview
9
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Why Are American Health Care Costs So High?

In which John discusses the complicated reasons why the United States spends so much more on health care than any other country in the world, and along the way reveals some surprising information, including that Americans spend more of their tax dollars on public health care than people in Canada, the UK, or Australia. Who's at fault? Insurance companies? Drug companies? Malpractice lawyers? Hospitals? Or is it more complicated than a simple blame game? (Hint: It's that one.) For a much more thorough examination of health care expenses in America, I recommend this series at The Incidental Economist: http://theincidentaleconomist.com/wordpress/what-makes-the-us-health-care-system-so-expensive-introduction/ The Commonwealth Fund's Study of Health Care Prices in the US: http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Issue%20Brief/2012/May/1595_Squires_explaining_high_hlt_care_spending_intl_brief.pdf Some of the stats in this video also come from this New York Times story: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/health/colonoscopies-explain-why-us-leads-the-world-in-health-expenditures.html?pagewanted=all This is the first part in what will be a periodic series on health care costs and reforms leading up to the introduction of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, in 2014.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 t4jn?1444773937
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357

Death by Powerpoint.

Introduction Computerised presentations are a part of every medical student's / junior doctor's life. Sometimes we give them, often we sleep through them and occasionally we even listen to them. They are the backbone of medical education besides traditional bed-side teaching, having rapidly replaced the now extinct OHR (Over Head Projector) acetate-sheet presentations of years gone-by. The problem is that Doctors and medical students often struggle with creating and presenting coherent slides. This is most probably due to the general apathy most have for actually talking in front of an audience, or because those asked to present are often taken unawares, and therefore have little time to prepare. In these times of avolition or last-minute hurriedness, people often reach out for the industry standard of presentation production: PowerPoint. PowerPoint is the most commonly used tool for making presentations because it is simple to use and comes with a whole load of free templates. Unfortunately, most of these templates look disgusting. If a template doesn't look disgusting, then it is most certainly overused and you run the risk of having a presentation that looks identical to the student before you at the weekly seminar teaching - a scenario that can be easily likened to turning up to a lecture wearing exactly the same clothes as another person in the room, which would just be awkward. Another problem with PowerPoint is the phenomenon of 'Death By Powerpoint,' which refers to the general boredom and apathy experienced by those who have received way too much information in way too short a space of time via a series of over-cramped, poorly stylised slides. But why on earth do you care? People should care about 'Death By Powerpoint' because if your presentations cause people to zone out, then you are not getting your message across. And if you aren't getting your message across then you. are. not. presenting. at. all. (take a moment to reflect on that particularly Zen statement). Let me explain using a metaphor, if I am a sales person and I present my talk with well-designed slides, in an enthusiastic and well-rehersed manner to an appropriate audience I will make more sales than if I present using poorly designed slides at the last minute. Similarly, in Medicine if I present well designed, aesthetic slides I am more likely to convey accurate information to my colleagues that may very well be retained and enjoyed by all involved. Of course, this blog assumes a degree of presentation-related Altruism. The recommendations I am about to make require you to 'step out of the mould' and say 'no' to poor presentations. They require you to forgive others for the presentations they have inflicted on you in the past. You will 'lead by example'. Unfortunately I am not capable (or qualified) to make you an excellent designer, nor can I give you the motivation to feel as passionately about design aesthetics as i do when all you've got to do is slam some slides together for your monthly journal club. But what I can do is present to you a series of resources that might tempt you away from the horrific PowerPoint templates that currently infest medical student seminars and young doctors presentations. If you really couldn't care less, then I suggest using Prezi, a website where you can make quite eccentric looking presentations rapidly and for free. The only problem is that Prezi became cliched even before its debut and you risk inflicting travel sickness on your poor audience, what with all the funky zooming in and out of slides that occurs during a typical Prezi presentation (you will know what I mean if you've ever seen one). So, without further ado, here are my top 5 tips for making your presentations look smoother and more polished... Irrespective of whether the contents of your talk are any good. Step One: Typography Get yourself a good font. Typography is really important, when you speak to someone you use a variety of tones and gestures to convey the meaning of the words you are using. Fonts are effectively the printed version of your tone and gestures. Good font choice can help give 'umph' to a particular point in your presentation and help give character to what you are saying. Of course, it's important to remain professional so 'Wingbats' might not be your first choice, but anything that you could envisage on a nice business card is probably a good shout. Fonts are usually something you have to pay for if you want anything beyond the set given to you when you download Microsoft Word (for example). However, there are whole hosts of free fonts available from sites like [dafont])(http://www.dafont.com). The key is to be willing to trawl through these sites to find fonts that are actually useful! Beware those fancy fonts unless you know your audience can take it! If you are stuck on choosing a font, which is a common complaint, then maybe this flow diagram will help! Oh yeah, and never ever use Comic Sans. Ever. Step Two: Colour A good font isn't going to get you very far on its own. You need a solid colour scheme to bring your presentation alive. It seems blunt to say, but some people are not very good at picking colours that go well with one another. This is well evidenced in PowerPoint presentations where the yellow-text-on-blue-background is far too common. I mean yeah, in theory blue and yellow 'compliment' each other, but thats where the relationship between blue and yellow should stay... in theory. Luckily there are some useful colour palette websites available out there, which will match colours for you... Step Three: Structure After you've picked a sensible font and a suitable colour scheme, it's time to think about the structure or layout of your slides. It's absolutely crucial that you avoid putting too much information on your slides even if you are giving an academic presentation. An overloaded slide is about as useful as a dead cat. At this point, some of you may be tempted to resort to those dodgy PowerPoint default templates but there is another way! There are sites out there that have some pretty fresh templates you can use and they are completely free! They are sure to add a bit of spice to your slide's aesthetic. There will probably be a separate tutorial on this in the future, but basic principles apply. As a general rule stick to Left Alignment *and avoid *Central Alignment like the plague. Step Four: Imagery Images help to spice up a presentation, but try and keep them related to the topic. Google Images is a great resource but remember that most images will be a low resolution and will be poorly suited to being shown blown up full-size on a presentation screen. Low resolution images are a presentation killer and should be avoided at all costs. For high-quality images try sites like Flikr or ShutterStock. Step Five: Consider Software The interface of Powerpoint does not lend itself well to having images dropped in and played with to make nice looking layouts. I would recommend Adobe Photoshop for this kind of work, but not everyone will have access to such expensive software. Cheap alternatives include Photoshop Elements amongst others. Once you have created slides in Photoshop it is quick and easy to save them as JPEG files and drag and drop them into PowePoint. Perhaps that can be a tutorial for another time... Step 5: Additional Stuff Presentations typically lack significance, structure, simplicity and rehearsal. Always check over your presentation and ask 'is this significant to my audience?' Always structure your presentation in a logical manner and (it is recommended you) include a contents slide and summary slide to tie things together. Keep your verbal commentary simple and keep the slides themselves even more simple than that. Simplicity is crucial. Once you have produced your beautiful slides with wonderful content you will want to practice them. Practice, Practice, Practice. Rehearsing even just once can make a good presentation even better. Conclusion: This blog entry has covered some basic points on how to improve your medical presentations and has given a series of useful online resources. Putting effort into designing a presentation takes time and motivation, for those without these vital ingredients we recommend Prezi (whilst it is still relatively new and fresh). Perhaps the rest of you will only use these tips for the occasional important presentation. However, I hope that soon after you start approaching presentations with a little more respect for their importance and potential, you too will find a desire to produce high-quality, aesthetically pleasing talks. LARF - Mood: damn tired and feeling guilty that I just wrote this blog instead of revising haematology notes. Follow me on Twitter. Follow the Occipital Designs original blog. Check out my Arterial Schematic.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 6 years ago