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Rehabilitation

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Progress and self-assessment in clinical practice in occupational therapy education in Japan

A purpose of this study is to investigate the change of the time progress of self-assessment that the students who were registered as " clinical clerkship" " clinical internship " and their education objects and practicing school year .  
chichiro sasaki
about 9 years ago
3
2
43

Developmental Assessment

This podcast helps students develop an approach to developmental assessment . This podcast was written by Peter Gill and Dr. Debbi Andrews. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Andrews is a developmental pediatrician at the University of Alberta Stollery Children’s Hospital and Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content at www.pedscases.com.  
Pedscases.Com
about 8 years ago
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45

Andy Franklyn-Miller - Tuning up rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction

Stream Andy Franklyn-Miller - Tuning up rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Cochrane logo 400
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Cochrane Reviews | Cochrane Community Archive

Cochrane Reviews are systematic reviews of primary research in human health care and health policy, and are internationally recognised as the highest standard in evidence-based health care. They investigate the effects of interventions for prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. They also assess the accuracy of a diagnostic test for a given condition in a specific patient group and setting. They are published online in The Cochrane Library.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
12

GPs urge government to create a national self care strategy

GPs have urged the government to create a national self care strategy and stop “stoking unrealistic patient expectations.”  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
43

Management and prevention of exacerbations of COPD

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prone to acute respiratory exacerbations, which can develop suddenly or subacutely over the course of several days. Exacerbations have a detrimental effect on patients’ health status and increase the burden on the healthcare system. Initial treatment is unsuccessful in 24-27% of patients, who have a relapse or a second exacerbation within 30 days of the initial event. No obvious benefit has been seen in recent clinical trials of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy, anti-leukotriene therapy, intensive chest physiotherapy, or early inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for treatment of exacerbations. By contrast, clinical trials of prevention rather than acute treatment have shown promising results. Long acting β agonist (LABA) or long acting anti-muscarinic (LAMA) bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroid-LABA combinations prevent exacerbations in patients at risk, with relative risk reductions averaging 14-27% for each of these drugs relative to placebo. Triple therapy with inhaled corticosteroid-LABA plus LAMA may provide additional benefit, although study results to date are heterogeneous and more studies are needed. Pneumonia is an important complication of treatment with inhaled corticosteroid-LABA products, and the risk of pneumonia seems to be doubled in patients with COPD who use fluticasone. The addition of azithromycin to usual COPD therapy prevents exacerbations, although it may prolong the Q-T interval and increase the risk of death from cardiovascular disease in patients prone to arrhythmia. New potential drugs—including mitogen activated protein kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitors, and monoclonal antibodies to the interleukin 1 receptor—offer additional hope for treatments that may prevent exacerbations in the future.  
bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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Determinants of effective heart failure self-care

Stream Determinants of effective heart failure self-care by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 4 years ago
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Critical Care Study Guide

Critical care medicine is a dynamic and exciting arena where complex pathophysiologic states require extensive knowledge and up-to-date clinical information. An extensive kno- edge of basic pathophysiology, as well as awareness of the appropriate diagnostic tests and treatments that are used to optimize care in the critically ill is essential. Since our frst edition 7 years ago, new information crucial to the care and understanding of the critically ill patient has rapidly accumulated. Because this knowledge base crosses many different disciplines, a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach presenting the information is essential, similar to the multidisciplinary approach that is used to care for the critically ill patient. We have strived to provide this content in an easily digestible format that uses a variety of teaching tools to facilitate understanding of the presented concepts and to enhance information retention. To meet the demand to provide comprehensive and diverse education in order to und- stand the pathogenesis and optimum care of a variety of critical illnesses, we have subst- tially revised the prior topics in the frst edition with updated information. We have also markedly expanded the number of topics covered to include acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome, an expanded discussion of the physiology and operation of mechanical ventilation, obstetrical care in the ICU, neurosurgical emergencies, acute co- nary syndromes, cardiac arrhythmias, role of whole body rehabilitation in the ICU, ethical conduct of human research in the ICU, and nursing care of the ICU patient.  
Google Books
over 3 years ago
Static.www.bmj
1
8

Management of spasticity in the face of multimorbidity

The clinical review on managing spasticity in adults is important for both primary and secondary care clinicians.1 Most patients with troublesome spasticity from conditions such as stroke and multiple sclerosis have other associated long term conditions. Multimorbidity is now the norm in clinical practice,2 including neurological rehabilitation, geriatrics, and primary care.  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
%3fr=0
7
105

Physician Don’t Heal Thyself

By Genevieve Yates One reason why I chose to do medicine was that I didn’t always trust doctors – another being access to an endless supply of jelly beans. My mistrust stemmed from my family’s unfortunate collection of medical misadventures: Grandpa’s misdiagnosed and ultimately fatal cryptococcal meningitis, my brother’s missed L4/L5 fracture, Dad’s iatrogenic brachial plexus injury and the stuffing-up of my radius and ulna fractures, to name a few. I had this naïve idea that my becoming a doctor would allow me to be more in charge of the health of myself and my family. When I discovered that doctors were actively discouraged from treating themselves, their loved ones and their mothers-in-law, and that a medical degree did not come with a lifetime supply of free jelly beans, I felt cheated. I got over the jelly bean disappointment quickly – after all, the allure of artificially coloured and flavoured gelatinous sugar lumps was far less strong at age 25 than it was at age 5 – but the Medical Board’s position regarding self-treatment took a lot longer to swallow. Over the years I’ve come to understand why guidelines exist regarding treating oneself and one’s family, as well as close colleagues, staff and friends. Lack of objectivity is not the only problem. Often these types of consults occur in informal settings and do not involve adequate history taking, examination or note-making. They can start innocently enough but have the potential to run into serious ethical and legal minefields. I’ve come to realise that, like having an affair with your boss or lending your unreliable friend thousands of dollars to buy a car, treating family, friends and staff is a pitfall best avoided. Although we’ve all heard that “A physician who heals himself has an idiot for a doctor and a fool for a patient”, large numbers of us still self-treat. I recently conducted a self-care session with about thirty very experienced GP supervisors whose average age was around fifty. When asked for a show of hands as to how many had his/her own doctor, about half the group confidently raised their hands. I then asked these to lower their hands if their nominated doctor was a spouse, parent, practice partner or themselves. At least half the hands went down. When asked if they’d seek medical attention if they were significantly unwell, several of the remainder said, “I don’t get sick,” and one said, “Of course I’d see a doctor – I’d look in the mirror.” Us girls are a bit more likely to seek medical assistance than the blokes (after all, it is pretty difficult to do your own PAP smear – believe me, I’ve tried), but neither gender group can be held up as a shining example of responsible, compliant patients. It seems very much a case of “Do as I say, not do as I do”. I wonder how much of this is due to the rigorous “breed ’em tough” campaigns we’ve been endured from the earliest days of our medical careers. I recall when one of my fellow interns asked to finish her DEM shift twenty minutes early so that she could go to the doctor. Her supervising senior registrar refused her request and told her, “Routine appointments need to be made outside shift hours. If you are sick enough to be off work, you should be here as a patient.” My friend explained that this was neither routine, nor a life-threatening emergency, but that she thought she had a urinary tract infection. She was instructed to cancel her appointment, dipstick her own urine, take some antibiotics out of the DEM supply cupboard and get back to work. “You’re a doctor now; get your priorities right and start acting like one” was the parting message. Through my work in medical education, I’ve had the opportunity to talk to several groups of junior doctors about self-care issues and the reasons for imposing boundaries on whom they treat, hopefully encouraging to them to establish good habits while they are young and impressionable. I try to practise what I preach: I see my doctor semi-regularly and have a I’d-like-to-help-you-but-I’m-not-in-a-position-to-do-so mantra down pat. I’ve used this speech many times to my advantage, such as when I’ve been asked to look at great-aunt Betty’s ulcerated toe at the family Christmas get-together, and to write a medical certificate and antibiotic script for a whingey boyfriend with a man-cold. The message is usually understood but the reasons behind it aren’t always so. My niece once announced knowledgably, “Doctors don’t treat family because it’s too hard to make them pay the proper fee.” This young lady wants to be a doctor when she grows up, but must have different reasons than I did at her age. She doesn’t even like jelly beans! Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
about 5 years ago
Static.www.bmj
0
5

Management of spasticity in the face of multimorbidity

The clinical review on managing spasticity in adults is important for both primary and secondary care clinicians.1 Most patients with troublesome spasticity from conditions such as stroke and multiple sclerosis have other associated long term conditions. Multimorbidity is now the norm in clinical practice,2 including neurological rehabilitation, geriatrics, and primary care.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Rats, reasoning, and rehabilitation: Neuroscientists are uncovering how we reason

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Breast cancer survivors benefit from exercise therapy, acupuncture

Two new studies from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Prosthetic hands, robotic trousers and biosensors - £5.3 million for healthcare tech research

A prosthetic hand controlled by the nervous system, robotic clothing to help people with walking, and biosensors to monitor how patients use equipment or exercise during rehabilitation are the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Blood glucose self-monitoring: often unnecessary and expensive

For many people with type 2 diabetes, blood glucose self-monitoring is an often unnecessary and unpleasant task that confers no benefit at very high and increasing cost, according to John...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Robots for stroke rehabilitation

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire and a team of European partners have developed a prototype of a robotic glove which stroke suffers can use in their own home to support...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Strength training still advisable in older age

In Austria, around ten per cent of over-65-year-olds are frail, while a further 40 per cent are in a preliminary stage of frailty.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Challenges of soldier rehabilitation and reintegration need closer attention

Veterans returning from combat often face a multitude of challenges: Debilitating physical and psychological conditions, a civil society that does not support and even actively criticizes the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Determinants of effective heart failure self-care

Stream Determinants of effective heart failure self-care by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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SingFit: Leveraging Technology to Scale Music Therapy

Music therapist, Andy Tubman, wants everyone to get a whole brain workout by singing. That's why he developed SingFit, technology to scale music therapy. He ...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago