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Rehabilitation after critical illness in adults | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or service users. The application of the recommendations in this guideline are not mandatory and the guideline does not override the responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or their carer or guardian.  
nice.org.uk
almost 4 years ago
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Mental wellbeing in over 65s: occupational therapy and physical activity interventions | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

This guidance is for all those involved in promoting older people's mental wellbeing. It focuses on practical support for everyday activities, based on occupational therapy principles and methods. This includes working  with older people and their carers to agree what kind of support they need.  
nice.org.uk
almost 4 years ago
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Psychology History

Harry F. Harlow was an American Psychologist who provided a new understanding of human behavior and development through studies of social behavior of monkeys. His research contributions (in the areas of learning, motivation, and affection) have major relevance for general and child psychology. Harlow obtained both his BA and PhD in Psychology from Stanford University. Upon completion of his PhD, Harlow joined the psychology staff at the University of Wisconsin (Madison). He was a modest, brilliant man who enjoyed spending time with students and took special pride in teaching introductory psychology courses. Nearly forty students obtained their PhD under his direction. Professor Harlow's research developed an abundant supply of primate learning tests and tasks that became standards in the field. In general, Harlow wanted to prove to the psychology community that primate research could contribute to the understanding of important clinical issues without having to be molecular in nature. His theory hinged on the universal need for contact. Harlow's famous wire/cloth "mother" monkey studies demonstrated that the need for affection created a stronger bond between mother and infant than did physical needs (food). Harlow was a member several Science and Psychological Associations, including the American Psychological Association, National Academy of Arts & Sciences, and Sigma Xi. He was a national lecturer and also a consultant to the Army's Scientific Advisory Panel. During his career, he was recognized with several distinctions, including: Howard Crosby Warren Medal (1956), National Medal of Science (1967), and Gold Medal from American Psychological Foundation (1973). Much of his primate research regarding social separation, affection, attachment, love, learning, and early life behaviors was published. Harlow died in 1981, at the age of 75. His life work provided a developmental framework based on data results rather than convoluted theories with limited empirical support. Theory In Harlow's initial experiments, infant monkeys were separated from their mothers [visit this site] at six to twelve hours after birth and were raised instead with substitute or "surrogate" mothers made either of heavy wire mesh or of wood covered with cloth. Both mothers were the same size, but the wire mother had no soft surfaces while the other mother was cuddly – covered with foam rubber and soft terry cloth. Both mothers were also warmed by an electric light placed inside them. In one experiment both types of surrogates were present in the cage, but only one was equipped with a nipple from which the infant could nurse. Some infants received nourishment from the wire mother, and others were fed from the cloth mother. Even when the wire mother was the source of nourishment (and a source of warmth provided by the electric light), the infant monkey spent a greater amount of time clinging to the cloth surrogate. These results led researchers to believe the need for closeness and affection goes deeper than a need for warmth. These monkeys raised by the dummy mothers engaged in strange behavioral patterns later in their adult life. Some sat clutching themselves, rocking constantly back and forth; a stereotypical behavior pattern for excessive and misdirected aggression. Normal sexual behaviors were replaced my misdirected and atypical patterns: isolate females ignored approaching normal males, while isolate males made inaccurate attempts to copulate with normal females. As parents, these isolate female monkeys (the "motherless mothers" as Harlow called them) were either negligent or abusive. Negligent mothers did not nurse, comfort, or protect their young, nor did they harm them. The abusive mothers violently bit or otherwise injured their babies, to the point that many of them died. Deprivation of emotional bonds to live mother monkeys (as infant monkeys) these (now adult) monkeys were unable to create a secure attachment with their own offspring. (Principles of General Psychology, 1980, John Wiley and Sons). Harlow's research suggested the importance of mother/child bonding. Not only does the child look to his/her mother for basic needs such as food, safety, and warmth, but he also needs to feel love, acceptance, and affection from the caregiver. His findings show some long-term psychological physical effects of delinquent or inadequate attentiveness to child needs. Harlow also did learning research with his monkeys. His theory, "Learning to Learn", described the ability of animals to slowly learn a general rule that could then be applied to rapidly solve new problem sets. Harlow presented the monkey with two stimuli (a red block and a thimble, for example); one was predetermined "correct" and reinforced with food (red block) and the other was "incorrect" and not reinforced with food (thimble). After each selection, the objects were replaced and the monkey again chose a stimulus. Each trial reinforced the same stimulus (red block). The monkey had a 50% chance of being "correct" on each trial, however, he could increase his chances by adopting the win-stay, lose-shiftstrategy. For example, if the monkey chose the thimble and was not reinforced, he should shift to the red block for the reinforcer. If, however, he correctly selected the red block and was reinforced, he should stay with the reinforced stimulus and choose the same stimulus next time. The monkey continued throughout a series of six trials with eight pairs of stimuli (learning sets). Harlow found the monkeys to be averaging approximately 75% correct responses by the sixth trial of the eighth set. He then began to look at the animal's behavior during the second trial. He found the monkeys to implement the stay or shift strategy on the second trial of the six-trial set, which means the animals did not relearn the strategy with each new stimuli set, they instead applied the rule they had already learned. After 250-plus trials, the monkeys were about 98% correct on the second through the sixth trials with each new stimuli set. Harlow's learning research demonstrates that animals, like humans, are able to learn to apply strategies or rules to situations to help them solve problems. Time Line Born October 31 in Fairfield, Iowa Son of Lon and Mabel (Rock) Israel 30-44 Staff, University of Wisconsin at Madison; Married Clara Mears 39-40 * Carnegie Fellow of Anthropology at Columbia University 44-74 George Cary Comstock Research Professor of Psychology 46 Divorced Clara Mears; Married Margaret Kuenne 47-48 President, Midwestern Psychological Association 50-51 President of Division of Experimental Psychology, American Psychological Association 50-52 Head of Human Resources Research Branch of Department of Army 53-55 Head of Division of Anthropology and Psychology of National Research Council 56 * Howard Crosby Warren Medal 56-74 Director of Primate Lab, University of Wisconsin 58-59 President, American Psychological Association 59,65 Sigma Xi National Lecturer 1960 * Distinguished Psychologist Award, APA / Messenger Lecturer at Cornell University 61-71 Director of Regional Primate Research Center 64-65 President of Division of Comparative & Physiological Psychology, APA 67 * National Medal of Science 1970 Margaret (wife) died 71 Harris Lecturer at Northwestern University / Remarried Clara Mears, Children: 3 Sons, 1 Daughter 72 Martin Rehfuss Lecturer at Jefferson Medical College / * Gold Medal from American Psychological Foundation / * Annual Award from Society for the Scientific Study of Sex 74 University of Arizona (Tucson) Honorary Research Professor of Psychology 75 * Von Gieson Award from New York State Psychiatric Institute 76 * International Award from Kittay Scientific Foundation Also Member of the following (dates not given): Consultant to Army Scientific Advisory Pannel; American Philosophical Society; National Academy of Sciences; National Academy of Arts and Sciences ; Sigma Xi ; Phi Kappa Phi 1981 Died * Denotes Awards and Honors Bibliography Harlow, H. F.; Zimmermann, Robert. Affectional responses in the infant monkey. Foundations of animal Behavior. (1996), xvi, 843, 376-387. Harlow, H., et al. Social rehabilitation of separation-induced depressive disorders in monkeys. American Journal of Psychiatry. (1976), v. 133(11), 1279-1285. Harlow, H., et al. Effects of maternal and peer separations on young monkeys. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry & Allied Disciplines. (1976), v. 17(2), 101-112. Harlow, H. Lust, latency and love: Simian secrets of successful sex. Journal of Sex Research. (1975), v. 11(2), 79-90. Harlow, H. A variable-temperature surrogate mother for studying attachment in infant monkeys. Behavior Research Methods. (1973), v. 5(3), 269-272. Harlow, H., et al. The sad ones: Studies in depression. Psychology Today. (1971), v. 4(12), 61-63. Harlow, H., et al. Nature of love: Simplified. American Psychologist. (1970), v. 25(2), 161-168. [History Home Page] [Psychology Department Home Page]  
muskingum.edu
over 3 years ago
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Crutch Training with Safety Tips

Crutch Training.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Recovery from Addiction Begins Here

Recovery Rehabs is the first step toward an addiction free life. Here, we can help you the necessary treatment to begin rehabilitation. | Issuu is a digital publishing platform that makes it simple to publish magazines, catalogs, newspapers, books, and more online. Easily share your publications and get them in front of Issuu’s millions of monthly readers. Title: Recovery from Addiction Begins Here, Author: RecoveryRehab, Name: recovery_rehabs.pptx, Length: 12 pages, Published: 2016-05-31T00:00:00.000Z  
issuu.com
over 3 years ago
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Cardiac Rehabilitation

Physical activity is healthy for your heart—even after you've had a heart attack or bypass surgery. It's important to start out slowly, under the supervision...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Sign language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A sign language (also signed language) is a language which chiefly uses manual communication to convey meaning, as opposed to acoustically conveyed sound patterns. This can involve simultaneously combining hand shapes, orientation and movement of the hands, arms or body, and facial expressions to express a speaker's thoughts. Sign languages share many similarities with spoken languages (sometimes called "oral languages", which depend primarily on sound), which is why linguists consider both to be natural languages. Although there are also some significant differences between signed and spoken languages, such as how they use space grammatically, sign languages show the same linguistic properties and use the same language faculty as do spoken languages.[1][2] They should not be confused with body language, which is a kind of non-linguistic communication.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 3 years ago
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fysionet-evidencebased.nl
about 3 years ago
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Therapeutic Exercise: Foundations and Techniques Videos - YouTube

Welcome to the video library for Kisner and Colby's Therapeutic Exercise: Foundations and Techniques, 5th Edition.They cover Range of Motion, Stretching, Joi...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
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Goniometry Videos : Measurement of Range Of Motion(ROM) of All Joints

Welcome to the F.A. Davis goniometry videos.Each video walks you through the entire technique, from positioning the patient on the table, to positioning the ...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
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Andy Franklyn-Miller - Tuning up rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction

Stream Andy Franklyn-Miller - Tuning up rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
Static.www.bmj
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Management of spasticity in the face of multimorbidity

The clinical review on managing spasticity in adults is important for both primary and secondary care clinicians.1 Most patients with troublesome spasticity from conditions such as stroke and multiple sclerosis have other associated long term conditions. Multimorbidity is now the norm in clinical practice,2 including neurological rehabilitation, geriatrics, and primary care.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Rats, reasoning, and rehabilitation: Neuroscientists are uncovering how we reason

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Breast cancer survivors benefit from exercise therapy, acupuncture

Two new studies from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Prosthetic hands, robotic trousers and biosensors - £5.3 million for healthcare tech research

A prosthetic hand controlled by the nervous system, robotic clothing to help people with walking, and biosensors to monitor how patients use equipment or exercise during rehabilitation are the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Robots for stroke rehabilitation

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire and a team of European partners have developed a prototype of a robotic glove which stroke suffers can use in their own home to support...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Strength training still advisable in older age

In Austria, around ten per cent of over-65-year-olds are frail, while a further 40 per cent are in a preliminary stage of frailty.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Challenges of soldier rehabilitation and reintegration need closer attention

Veterans returning from combat often face a multitude of challenges: Debilitating physical and psychological conditions, a civil society that does not support and even actively criticizes the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Determinants of effective heart failure self-care

Stream Determinants of effective heart failure self-care by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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SingFit: Leveraging Technology to Scale Music Therapy

Music therapist, Andy Tubman, wants everyone to get a whole brain workout by singing. That's why he developed SingFit, technology to scale music therapy. He ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago