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Rehabilitation

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SingFit: Leveraging Technology to Scale Music Therapy - YouTube

Music therapist, Andy Tubman, wants everyone to get a whole brain workout by singing. That's why he developed SingFit, technology to scale music therapy. He ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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Social skills programmes for people with schizophrenia | Cochrane

Social skills programmes (SSP) use behavioural therapy and techniques for teaching individuals to communicate their emotions and requests. This means they are more likely to achieve their goals, meet their needs for relationships and for independent living as well as getting on with other people and socially adjusting. Social skills programmes involve 'model learning' (role playing) which was introduced to improve general 'molecular' skills (eye contact, fluency of speech, gestures) and 'molar' skills (managing negative emotions, giving positive feedback). Social skills programmes enhance social performance and reduce the distress and difficulty experienced by people with schizophrenia. Social skills programmes can be incorporated as part of a rehabilitation package for people with schizophrenia.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Motivational interviewing for improving recovery after stroke | Cochrane

Psychological problems such as depression and anxiety are common complications following stroke that can cause stroke survivors to lack the motivation to take part in activities of daily living or rehabilitation. Motivational interviewing is a counselling method that is designed to help people to change their behaviour through discovering and resolving their conflicts by a standardised communication skill. It provides a specific way for enhancing their expectations and beliefs of recovery following stroke. We wanted to know whether motivational interviewing was an effective treatment to improve activities of daily living after stroke.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Interventions for drug-using offenders with co-occurring mental illness | Cochrane

A number of policy directives are aimed at enabling people with drug problems to live healthy, crime-free lives. Drug-using offenders with co-occurring mental health problems represent a group who access treatment for a variety of different reasons. The complexity of the two problems makes the treatment and rehabilitation of this group particularly challenging.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Pharmacological interventions for drug-using offenders | Cochrane

Drug-using offenders by their nature represent a socially excluded group in which drug use is more prevalent than in the rest of the population. Pharmacological interventions play an important role in the rehabilitation of drug-using offenders. For this reason, it is important to investigate what we know works when pharmacological interventions are provided for offenders.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Critical Care

Burns are a prevalent and burdensome critical care problem. The priorities of specialized facilities focus on stabilizing the patient, preventing infection, and optimizing functional recovery. Research on burns has generated sustained interest over the past few decades, and several important advancements have resulted in more effective patient stabilization and decreased mortality, especially among young patients and those with burns of intermediate extent. However, for the intensivist, challenges often exist that complicate patient support and stabilization. Furthermore, burn wounds are complex and can present unique difficulties that require late intervention or life-long rehabilitation. In addition to improvements in patient stabilization and care, research in burn wound care has yielded advancements that will continue to improve functional recovery. This article reviews recent advancements in the care of burn patients with a focus on the pathophysiology and treatment of burn wounds.  
ccforum.com
over 4 years ago
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Rehabilitation for people with dementia following a hip fracture operation | Cochrane

Hip fracture is an injury primarily of elderly people, usually caused by a fall. It can affect a person's ability to walk, perform activities of daily living and remain independent. Hip fracture is more common in people with dementia and they can find it more difficult to recover. This is because they are at greater risk of becoming more confused and developing additional complications such as pressure sores and chest infections after their operation. They may also find it more difficult to express their pain and discomfort.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Exercise rehabilitation following intensive care unit discharge for recovery from critical illness | Cochrane

We reviewed the evidence about the effects of exercise rehabilitation on functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life for patients who have been critically unwell in the intensive care unit (ICU). Functional exercise capacity is a term used to express how well individuals perform activities such as walking or climbing the stairs.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Independent Living Fund: What is going to happen now? - BBC News

The Independent Living Fund is closing on Tuesday. But what is it and who will it affect?  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Goal setting for adults receiving clinical rehabilitation for disability | Cochrane

Goal setting is considered a key part of clinical rehabilitation for adults with disability, such as in rehabilitation following brain injuries, heart or lung diseases, mental health illnesses, or for injuries or illnesses involving bones and muscles. Health professionals use goals to provide targets for themselves and their clients to work towards. In this review we summarise studies that have investigated what effect, if any, goal setting activities have on achieving good health outcomes following rehabilitation.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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Self management for a man with asthma

A 35 year old man with a history of asthma attended the practice asthma clinic a few weeks after an acute exacerbation. He was a non-smoker who had asthma as a child but “grew out of” the more troublesome symptoms in his teens. He regards his asthma as well controlled, although his computer record suggested that he has had six short acting bronchodilator inhalers in the past year. He is more troubled by hay fever, which he manages with antihistamines that he buys from the pharmacy. He has a sedentary lifestyle so avoids exercise induced symptoms. He has a repeat prescription for an inhaled steroid (which he takes “when he needs it”) and carries a salbutamol inhaler with him in case he experiences any chest tightness. Despite annual invitations to the asthma clinic he last attended six years ago.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Ekso Works Exoskeleton Lets Workers Operate Heavy Tools With Ease | Medgadget

Exoskeletons have been used in rehabilitation to help paralyzed people walk on their own feet, as well as for military applications to allow soldiers to tr  
medgadget.com
over 4 years ago
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Comparison of different modes of cardiac rehabilitation | Cochrane

Cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore people with heart disease to health through a combination of exercise, education, and psychological support. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes (e.g. based within a hospital, gymnasium or a sport centre setting) are offered to individuals after cardiac events, while home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. The aim of this review was to compare the effects of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation. The findings of this review show that home- and hospital-based interventions are similar in their benefits on coronary heart disease risk factors (e.g. smoking, lipids, and blood pressure), health-related quality of life, death, clinical events, and costs. There was some evidence to suggest that home-based interventions were associated with a higher level of adherence. The general lack of reporting of methods in the included trial reports made it difficult to assess their methodological quality and thereby judge their risk of bias. Further data are needed to confirm whether these short-term effects of home- and centre-based cardiac rehabilitation can be confirmed in the longer term.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Multidisciplinary rehabilitation after brain tumour treatment | Cochrane

People with brain tumours can experience a range of symptoms and disabilities, such as psychological problems, difficulties with mobility or self care, and relationship and work issues, which can substantially impact their quality of life. These symptoms and disabilities may be addressed through 'multidisciplinary rehabilitation' delivered by a team of different healthcare professionals (for example doctors, nurses, therapists) working in an organised manner.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Music therapy, a refuge in the ICU

Hola a tod@s, my dear friends.Many times we have spoken on this blog about the inclusion of music in the ICU, source of benefits for patients without side effects.In the pain management, for the anxiety in ventilated patients, help in decreasing the need for sedatives or even in the developmental care.I invite you to watch this short……  
prehospitalmed.com
about 4 years ago
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Telerehabilitation for people with low vision | Cochrane

Review question This systematic review aimed to evaluate the benefits of providing remote vision rehabilitation services for people with low vision via telerehabilitation, which uses an Internet-based approach rather than the usual office-based consultations. The main outcome of interest is vision-related quality of life, but we also are interested in visual function measures such as reading speed, as well as compliance with scheduled sessions and patient satisfaction.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Exercise therapy for fatigue in multiple sclerosis | Cochrane

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease affecting over 1.3 million people globally. MS is characterized by diffuse damage to the central nervous system, leading to a wide range of different physical and cognitive (mental processes) symptoms. One of the most prominent and disabling symptoms of MS is fatigue. Currently, there is no effective medicine to reduce fatigue in people with MS. Treatment with exercise may be a way to reduce fatigue either directly by changing how the body works, for example hormonal function, or indirectly through improved physical activity and general health.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago
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Resistance Training Alters Mitochondrial Function in Muscle

In what ways does resistance exercise impact mitochondrial respiratory function within the skeletal muscle?  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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Intention to treat analysis versus per protocol analysis of trial data

Researchers evaluated the effectiveness of a self management programme for arthritis on the overall function of patients with osteoarthritis in primary care. A randomised controlled trial study design was used. The intervention was attendance at six sessions of self management of arthritis, plus an education booklet. The control group received the education booklet only. Participants were patients aged 50 years or more who had osteoarthritis of the hips or knees (or both) and pain or disability (or both). In total, 812 patients were recruited and randomised to the intervention (n=406) or control (n=406).1  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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Cardiac rehabilitation

Globally, the prevalence of coronary heart disease and heart failure is increasing, and there is some evidence of the health benefits of cardiac rehabilitation  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago