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Ecstasy is making a comeback, European drugs report warns

Methylenedioxymethamfetamine (MDMA), most commonly used in the form of “ecstasy” tablets, is returning as a stimulant drug of choice for young people in Europe, stated the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction in its annual report presented in Lisbon, Portugal, on 31 May.1  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 4 years ago
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What's Hot at ASCO 2016?

Continuing excitement over immunotherapy and new research on precision medicine are among the highlights. Come and visit Medscape at booth 6053.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Get your research published and be praised for it! EQUATOR workshop, Oxford 21 June 2016 | The EQUATOR Network

The EQUATOR Network is delighted to be hosting a practical workshop on 21 June 2016 in association with the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence Live 2016.  
equator-network.org
almost 4 years ago
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The EQUATOR Network | Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of Health Research

The Library contains a comprehensive searchable database of reporting guidelines and also links to other resources relevant to research reporting.  
equator-network.org
almost 4 years ago
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EQUATOR Network - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research)[1] Network is an international initiative aimed at promoting transparent and accurate reporting of health research studies to enhance the value and reliability of medical research literature.[2] The EQUATOR Network was established with the goals of raising awareness of the importance of good reporting of research, assisting in the development, dissemination and implementation of reporting guidelines for different types of study designs, monitoring the status of the quality of reporting of research studies in the health sciences literature, and conducting research relating to issues that impact the quality of reporting of health research studies.[3] The Network acts as an “umbrella” organisation, bringing together developers of reporting guidelines, medical journal editors and peer reviewers, research funding bodies, and other key stakeholders with a mutual interest in improving the quality of research publications and research itself.  
en.wikipedia.org
almost 4 years ago
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Epidemiology and Reporting Characteristics of Systematic Reviews of Biomedical Research: A Cross-Sectional Study

In a cross-sectional manuscript analysis, David Moher and colleagues score the prevalence, quality of conduct and completeness of reporting among systematic reviews published across medical disciplines in 2014.  
journals.plos.org
almost 4 years ago
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PLOS Medicine: A Peer-Reviewed Open-Access Journal

PLOS Medicine publishes research and commentary of general interest with clear implications for patient care, public policy or clinical research agendas.  
journals.plos.org
almost 4 years ago
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William Stern (psychologist) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Stern (German: [ʃtɛɐ̯n]; 29 April 1871 – 27 March 1938), born Wilhelm Louis Stern,[1] was a German psychologist and philosopher noted as a pioneer in the field of the psychology of personality and intelligence. He was the inventor of the concept of the intelligence quotient, or IQ, later used by Lewis Terman and other researchers in the development of the first IQ tests, based on the work of Alfred Binet. He was the father of the German writer and philosopher Günther Anders. In 1897, Stern invented the tone variator, allowing him to research human perception of sound in an unprecedented way.  
en.wikipedia.org
almost 4 years ago
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New Test Finds C difficile as Effective as Anaerobic Lab

A test for Clostridium difficile that involves components available in most labs is effective, new research shows, and could help solve the problem of underdiagnosis in many developing countries.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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First report on violent attacks on healthcare shows 959 deaths over two years

An attempt to track the number of attacks on healthcare in countries with emergencies has found a total of 594 attacks over a two year period from 2014 to 2015, resulting in 959 deaths and 1561 injuries.1  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 4 years ago
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Rind et al. controversy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Rind et al. controversy was a debate in the scientific literature, public media, and government legislatures in the United States regarding a 1998 peer reviewed meta-analysis of the self-reported harm caused by child sexual abuse (CSA).[1] The debate resulted in the unprecedented condemnation of the paper by both Houses of the United States Congress. The social science research community was concerned that the condemnation by government legislatures might have a chilling effect on the future publication of controversial research results.  
en.wikipedia.org
almost 4 years ago
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The Leadership Council - The Effect of Childhood Trauma on Brain Development

As recently as the 1980s, many professionals thought that by the time babies are born, the structure of their brains was already genetically determined. However, emerging research shows evidence of altered brain functioning as a result of early abuse and neglect. The key to why this occurs appears to be in the brain.  
leadershipcouncil.org
almost 4 years ago
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SHOULD THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH REMOVE ITS BAN ON ARTIFICIAL METHODS OF FAMILY PLANNING?

This is a question faced by many catholic health care providers throughout the world. The Roman Catholic Church officially opposes any artificial method of family planning. When Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church (Church from here on) in February 2013 as Pope Francis, catholics all over the world were encouraged by the idea that they might see some changes in the teachings of the Church as it relates to many issues pertaining to the “family”. These issues include divorce, remarriage, homosexuality, family planning and a number of other topics. I want to focus in this discussion on the longstanding opposition by the Church to the use of artificial methods of family planning (contraception). This ban on contraception affects catholic medical practitioners on a daily basis and this includes, family doctors, RNs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and any medical care giver involved with counseling clients about methods for planning their families and implementing the chosen methods. As we know, the Church allows only “natural methods” of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods”. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. The hope for a change in this official position of the Church has been fostered by the observation that Pope Francis seemed to be willing to listen and has made a number conciliatory remarks on issues like women’s equality, divorced and remarried couples and homosexuality, while continuing to accept only the natural methods of family planning. Then came the most recent publication by Pope Francis, “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This is a beautifully written document about issues related to the family, in which the Pope makes again conciliatory remarks about a number of issues, but reaffirms the position of the Church in regards to family planning. No artificial methods are condoned. This seems to close the door on this issue, at least for the foreseeable future. What a pity and what a missed opportunity for the Pope to bring the teachings of the Church as it pertains to contraception in line with the thinking and practice of the 21st century. It is well known, and adequate statistics are available to show that worldwide a large percentage of catholics are ignoring the teaching of the church as it pertains to family planning and availing themselves of contraception to plan their families. On a personal note I have spoken to a number of priests and asked them about my practice as a catholic obstetrician and gynecologist of prescribing and implementing artificial contraception for my catholic clients. Some of them have told me to following my conscience and continue what I am doing. That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. In this regard the recent publication from the Wiingaards Institute for Catholic Research might be of interest: http://www.catholicsandcontraception.com William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida  
DR William LeMaire
almost 4 years ago
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Light Alcohol Consumption: Predictor of Fatty Liver in MetS

New research studies whether minimal alcohol intake is protective against fatty liver in women with metabolic syndrome.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Precision Medicine and Research Ethics

Precision medicine is improving through genetics and genomics research, but also raises new ethical challenges.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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The Expanding Toolbox for Hepatitis C Virus Research

Despite the fact that there are many effective antiviral agents on the market to treat hepatitis C, it remains a major global health concern. What new treatments lie ahead to combat the disease and its potential drug-resistant viral variants?  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Double Reprocessing Decontaminates Duodenoscopes

A double-reprocessing disinfection protocol for duodenoscopes leads to a 'very low rate' of potentially pathogenic organisms, new research shows.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Perspectives on Key MS Data From the Annual Neurology Meeting CME

: Hear summaries of the most relevant research in multiple sclerosis that was presented at the 2016 American Academy of Neurology meeting.  
medscape.org
almost 4 years ago
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Imipenem-Cilastatin-Induced Psychosis: A Case Report

Were this patient's violent visual and auditory hallucinations a reaction to his antibiotic regimen?  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 136 | LITFL: Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog

Welcome to the 136th edition of Research and Reviews in the Fastlane. R&R in the Fastlane is a free resource that harnesses the power of social media t  
lifeinthefastlane.com
almost 4 years ago