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Figure 4-1b, [STEP WISE APPROACH FOR MANAGING ASTHMA IN CHILDREN 5–11 YEARS OF AGE]. - Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma - NCBI Bookshelf

National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, Third Expert Panel on the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Bethesda (MD): National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (US); 2007 Aug.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
over 1 year ago
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The horrific toll of America's heroin 'epidemic' - BBC News

Heroin abuse in the US has spread beyond inner cities, resulting in a sharp rise in deadly addiction. The BBC's Ian Pannell reports from Chicago, a hub for cheap, pure and plentiful heroin.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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NIMH » Gene May Bias Amygdala Response to Frightful Faces

The amygdala, the brain structure known as the hub of fear, responds differently to pictures of scary faces, depending on which version of a gene one has inherited, report National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) scientists.  
nimh.nih.gov
over 1 year ago
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Children's end-of-life care 'needs attention', a report says - BBC News

Children's palliative care in Wales needs more "strategic attention" by ministers and the NHS, a new report says.  
bbc.co.uk
about 2 years ago
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Asthma steroids 'could stunt growth' - BBC News

Young children given asthma medication before the age of two may not grow to their full height in later life, a preliminary report suggests.  
bbc.co.uk
almost 2 years ago
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Confidentiality Guidelines : Caldicott Report: key principles

Every proposed use or transfer of patient identifiable information within or from an organisation should be clearly defined and scrutinised. With continuing uses regularly reviewed, by an appropriate guardian.  
confidential.oxfordradcliffe.net
almost 3 years ago
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Children taught about sexual abuse more likely to report it

A new review finds children who take part in school-based programs designed to help prevent sexual abuse are more likely to report experiencing it currently or in the past.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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Children with dyslexia at increased risk for physical abuse

Adults who have dyslexia are much more likely to report they were physically abused before they turned 18 than their peers without dyslexia, according to a new study from researchers at the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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Can a computer diagnose, treat cancer?

Hoping to build the ultimate cancer resource, doctors turn to supercomputer "Watson." CNN's Deborah Feyerick reports.  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
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Improve end-of-life care for all, say MPs - BBC News

Social care should be free to everyone at the end of life, says a report by MPs which also calls for better recording of what people want in their final days.  
BBC News
over 2 years ago
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Technology – The saviour of the NHS?

Does the NHS really need saving? Your first question may be ‘does the NHS really need saving?’, and I would have to answer with an emphatic ‘Yes’. April this year sees the official start of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), the key component of The Health and Social Care Act, one of the biggest changes the NHS has seen. Amongst other things these organisations are tasked with saving the NHS £20 billion in the next 3 years by means of ‘efficiency changes’, despite the Institute of Fiscal Studies saying that the NHS needs to be spending £20 billion more each year by 2020. A daunting task but even more so in the light of the recently published Francis Report, where failings at Stafford Hospital have highlighted the need for compassionate patient care to be at the centre of all decisions. All of this has to be achieved in the largest publically funded health service in the world, which employs 1.7 million staff and serves more than 62 million people, with an annual budget of £106 billion (2011/12). So is it the solution? Clearly technology cannot be the only solution to this problem but I believe technology is pivotal in achieving the ‘efficiency changes’ desired. This might be direct use of technology to improve efficiency or may indirectly provide the intelligence that can drive non-technology based efficiencies; and if technology can be used to save clinicians time this can be reinvested into improving patient care. The NHS already has or is working on a number of national scale IT projects that could bring efficiency savings such as choose and book, electronic prescription service and map of medicine to name but a few. Newer and more localised projects include telehealth, clinical decision tools, remote working, the use of social media and real time patient data analysis. Yet many of these ideas, though new to the NHS, have been employed in business for many years. The NHS needs to catch up and then to further innovate. We need clinicians, managers and IT developers to work together if we are to be successful. Such change is not without its challenges and the size and complexity of the NHS makes implementation of change difficult. Patient safety and confidentiality has to be paramount but these create practical and technical barriers to development. I have just completed Connecting for Health’s Clinical Safety Training and there are some formidable hurdles to development and implementation of new IT systems in the NHS (ISB0129 and ISB0160). Procurement in the NHS is a beast of its own that I wouldn’t claim to understand but the processes are complex potentially making it difficult for small developers. The necessity of financial savings means the best solutions are not always chosen, even though that can be false economy in the long run. Yet we must not let these barriers stop us from seeking to employ technology for the good of clinicians and patients. We must not let them stifle innovation or be frustrated by what can be a slow process at times. The NHS recognises some of these issues and is working to try to help small businesses negotiate these obstacles. I hope in a series of posts in coming months to look in more detail at some of the technologies currently being used in the NHS, as well as emerging projects, and the opportunities and problems that surround them. I may stray occasionally into statistics or politics if you can cope with that! I am a practicing clinician with fingers in many pies so the frequency of my postings is likely to be inversely proportional to the workload I face! Comments are always welcome but I may not always reply in a timely manner.  
Dr Damian Williams
over 4 years ago
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Intern Report Collection, Vol. 8 - emdocs

Our ongoing intern report series is the product of first-year residents exploring clinical questions they have found to be particularly intriguing.  
emdocs.net
about 2 years ago
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Antimicrobial resistance is now widespread, warns WHO

Widespread resistance to antimicrobial drugs is not a future threat—it is happening now in hospitals and in the community, a report from the World Health Organization warns.1  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Flexner's Global Influence: Medical Education Accreditation... : Academic Medicine

Background: Abraham Flexner's report on medical education, published 100 years ago, remains influent  
journals.lww.com
over 3 years ago
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An Introduction to Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of partial cardiopulmonary bypass used for long-term support of respiratory and/or cardiac function. This technology arose from cardiopulmonary bypass used for cardiac surgery. Initial systems used bubble oxygenators which were poorly suited for prolonged use because of their tendency to hemolyze blood. Membrane oxygenators made long-term use of ECMO possible. The first report of successful ECMO support of an adult was published by Hill in 1972.  
perfusion.com
over 2 years ago
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Relevance of the Flexner Report to Contemporary Medical Educ... : Academic Medicine

A century after the publication of Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to th  
journals.lww.com
over 3 years ago
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Itraconazole Toxicity and Cardiac Health Problems

Itraconazole is an antifungal drug used widely to treat fungal infections and is active against Aspergillus, Candida and Cryptococcus. It is effective and now much cheaper as it has passed out of the period of time granted to its inventor to exclusively sell it - there are now several competing manufacturers. It seems to be an increasingly useful and used drug now it has become more accessible which is a good thing in the main but this makes it increasingly important that this drug is properly understood and its very severe potential side effects appreciated and guarded against. These are the warnings published by the World Health Organisation Risk of congestive heart failure The agency says that while the available evidence suggests that the risk of heart failure with short courses of itraconazole is low in healthy, young patients, prescribers should exercise caution when prescribing the drug to at-risk patients. Amendments to the product information of all itraconazole formulations have been made to reflect this information. Risk to pregnant women By April 2000 the UMC had received 43 case reports from 5 countries regarding the use of itraconazole by pregnant women. 25 of these pregnancies ended in embryonic or foetal death. The remaining 19 reports described a variety of congenital malformation or neonatal disorders. In the 38 reports in which the route of administration was specified the drug was taken orally. The data suggested that: inspite of the approved recommendations and warnings itraconazole is being taken by pregnant women for minor indications, reported human experience seems to lend support to the experimental evidence that itraconazole is teratogenic, there is a predominance of abortion, and more firm warnings may be needed in the product information.Although not apparent from the UMC reports, a further question of interest was if itraconazole might decrease the reliability of oral contraceptives and so lead to unintended exposure in pregnancy. Care thus needs to be taken about which patients are prescribed itraconazole, adequate monitoring needs to be put in place if needed and sufficient advice given with the drug to ensure the patient is aware of the risks involved and the signs & symptoms to look out for.  
Graham Atherton
over 4 years ago
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Will the NMC force occupational health to split from other nurses? - Personnel Today

The clock is ticking for occupational health (OH) practitioners to make their voice heard on the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) plans for three-yearly checks, or “revalidation”, of practitioners’ fitness to continue to practise and its proposals to revise the NMC Code of Conduct. Nic Paton reports.  
personneltoday.com
about 2 years ago
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3D Visualisation System Report

An overview of the project to create a 3D stereoscopic anatomy teaching resource for aortic anatomy and the pathology of abdominal aortic aneurysms.  
Philip Brown
over 6 years ago
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The vital role of pathologists in diagnosis and treatment

Some reports about pathologist concordance in breast cancer diagnoses have introduced doubts about the reliability of anatomic pathology as a whole. But is t...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago