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11
271

Seizure classifications, types for neuroscience pathology student: Tonic Clonic etc

Seizures include tonic clonic, abscence and status epileptics. Simple partial and complex partial as well.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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10
1622

Pharmacology Mnemonic: Partial Seizures: Phenytoin, Carbamazepine, Lamotrigine, Topiramate

Simple and complex partial seizures can be treated with medical drugs.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1317d55?1444774133
6
186

To the neurology/neurosurgery avids, those who just can't get it and others

Hi guys, my name is Angela! I am currently an F2 doing a year in Australia! My key interest is neurosurgery and as a neurosurgery SHO now in Adelaide, I thought I'd start a blog on a few neurosurgery/neurology issues I encounter regularly on the wards. This is aimed to help all medical students studying neurology/F1/SHO in neurosurgery. Few topics could include: Basic management of neurosurgery/neurology patients - the neurology exam Ophthalmology exam and lesion representation Understanding GCS Raised intracranial pressure Acute head injury Seizure management Cauda equina Headaches Decreased conscious level Cord compression Electrolytes imbalance in the neurosurgical patient Fluid management in the neurosurgical patient Acute meningitis Any thoughts/comments?  
Angela Li Ching Ng
almost 7 years ago
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3
74

Exercise-associated hyponatremia in marathon runners: a two-year experience

This study was conducted to better define the pathophysiology, risk factors, and therapeutic approach to exercise-associated hyponatremia. Medical records from all participants in the 1998 Suzuki Rock ‘N’ Roll Marathon® who presented to 14 Emergency Departments (EDs) were retrospectively reviewed to identify risk factors for the development of hyponatremia. Hyponatremic patients were compared to other runners with regard to race time and to other marathon participants seen in the ED with regard to gender, clinical signs of dehydration, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). An original treatment algorithm incorporating the early use of hypertonic saline (HTS) was evaluated prospectively in our own ED for participants in the 1999 marathon to evaluate improvements in sodium correction rate and incidence of complications. A total of 26 patients from the 1998 and 1999 marathons were hyponatremic [serum sodium (SNa) ≤135 mEq/L] including 15 with severe hyponatremia (SNa ≤ 125 mEq/L). Three developed seizures and required intubation and admission to an intensive care unit. Hyponatremic patients were more likely to be female, use NSAIDS, and have slower finishing times. Hyponatremic runners reported drinking “as much as possible” during and after the race and were less likely to have clinical signs of dehydration. An inverse relationship between initial SNa and time of presentation was observed, with late presentation predicting lower SNa values. The use of HTS in selected 1999 patients resulted in faster SNa correction times and fewer complications than observed for 1998 patients. It is concluded that the development of exercise-associated hyponatremia is associated with excessive fluid consumption during and after extreme athletic events. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and NSAID use. The use of HTS in selected patients seems to be safe and efficacious.  
sciencedirect.com
over 6 years ago
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2
43

Febrile Convulsion

A seizure is a neurological event where there is a synchronous discharge of many neurons. Each individual has a ‘threshold’ at which their neurons will begin to do this. It is thought that this threshold is at least partly genetically determined. This threshold can be affected by: External stimulation – e.g. flashing lights Cerebral injury  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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1
51

How to manage the first seizure in an adult

Stream How to manage the first seizure in an adult by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
34

First seizures in adults

In 85% of patients, the diagnosis comes from the history; blood tests, electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging are important for classification and risk prediction  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

First seizures in adults

In 85% of patients, the diagnosis comes from the history; blood tests, electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging are important for classification and risk prediction  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
26

First seizures in adults

In 85% of patients, the diagnosis comes from the history; blood tests, electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging are important for classification and risk prediction  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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1
17

Podcast #11: All Seizures Stop…Eventually (Magnesium and Eclampsia)

A healthy 23 year old woman presents 37 weeks pregnant seizing. She has no history of seizures, drugs, trauma, illness, etc.  You are addressing the A, B, Cs and the nurses asks “what med do you want to stop the seizure”?  
thesgem.com
over 5 years ago
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1
30

Recognition of Common Childhood Malignancies - American Family Physician

Although cancer has an annual incidence of only about 150 new cases per 1 million U.S. children, it is the second leading cause of childhood deaths. Early detection and prompt therapy have the potential to reduce mortality. Leukemias, lymphomas and central nervous system tumors account for more than one half of new cancer cases in children. Early in the disease, leukemia may cause nonspecific symptoms similar to those of a viral infection. Leukemia should be suspected if persistent vague symptoms are accompanied by evidence of abnormal bleeding, bone pain, lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly. The presenting symptoms of a brain tumor may include elevated intracranial pressure, nerve abnormalities and seizures. A spinal tumor often presents with signs and symptoms of spinal cord compression. In children, lymphoma may present as one or more painless masses, often in the neck, accompanied by signs and symptoms resulting from local compression, as well as signs and symptoms of systemic disturbances, such as fever and weight loss. A neuroblastoma may arise from sympathetic nervous tissue anywhere in the body, but this tumor most often develops in the abdomen. The presentation depends on the local effects of the solid tumor and any metastases. An abdominal mass in a child may also be due to Wilms' tumor. This neoplasm may present with renal signs and symptoms, such as hypertension, hematuria and abdominal pain. A tumor of the musculoskeletal system is often first detected when trauma appears to cause pain and dysfunction out of proportion to the injury. Primary care physicians should be alert for possible presenting signs and symptoms of childhood malignancy, particularly in patients with Down syndrome or other congenital and familial conditions associated with an increased risk of cancer.  
aafp.org
over 5 years ago
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20

Propofol versus thiopental sodium for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus (RSE) | Cochrane

Persistent convulsions (lasting 30 minutes or more) are a major medical emergency associated with significant morbidity and mortality. At times, these convulsions fail to respond to first- and second-line drug therapy and may occur in up to 31% of patients suffering from persistent seizure or convulsive activities. Persistent seizure activity may become unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs. Anaesthetics such as thiopental sodium and propofol are frequently given for control of seizures in such situations. Both agents have their own side effects and complications. This review evaluates the evidence for the use of these anaesthetic drugs in controlling seizure activity in patients with RSE.  
cochrane.org
over 5 years ago
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13

Calcium Channel Blockers in Pregnancy Don't Up Neonatal Seizure Risk

Contrary to prior research, a new study reports no increased risk of seizures in neonates born to mothers exposed to CCBs in late pregnancy.  
neurologyadvisor.com
over 5 years ago
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1
9

Febrile Seizures

Febrile seizures, or seizures that occur during a fever, are one of the most common neurologic disorders of childhood. They typically appear between 6 months...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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1
9

Seizures

Seizures happen when the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals for a short period of time. This video explains why they occur and what treatments ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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0
13

Marijuana extract shows promise as severe epilepsy treatment

A small study has trialled a marijuana extract in people with severe epilepsy. Seizures decreased among the participants, though 6% stopped taking the drug after side effects.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 5 years ago
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0
12

New guideline on how to treat the one in 10 who experience a first seizure

In order to help doctors treat the millions of people who experience their first seizure each year, the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society have released a new...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 5 years ago
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9

Epilepsy drug could protect eyesight of MS patients

An anticonvulsant drug used to prevent seizures could protect people with MS from some of the damage caused by acute optic neuritis.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 5 years ago