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10

Fatal uncoupling in the epileptic brain

Scientists at the University of Bonn discover a new cause of the prevalent seizure...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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14

Direct brain neurostimulation for partial onset seizures provides long-term benefit

Piotr Olejniczak, MD, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor of Neurology and Director of the Epilepsy Center, contributed to a study of the long-term effectiveness of the first direct brain...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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15

Study: Medtronic deep brain stimulation therapy for treatment-resistant epilepsy shows significant and sustained seizure reduction at five year

Medtronic plc has announced five-year results from the pivotal SANTE (Stimulation of the Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in Epilepsy) trial, the largest clinical study of deep brain...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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20

Epilepsy drug may preserve eyesight for people with MS

A drug commonly taken to prevent seizures in epilepsy may surprisingly protect the eyesight of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released April 16, 2015 that will be...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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16

Seizures and migraines in the brain linked

Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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15

Deuterated sigma-1 agonist showed anti-seizure activity in traumatic brain injury models

Research results published in the Journal of Neurotrauma and conducted by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) as part of a collaboration with Concert Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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18

New AAN/AES Guideline on First Unprovoked Seizure in Adults

Experts recommend clinicians approach patients on an individualized basis in terms of whether to treat with an antiepileptic drug following a first unprovoked seizure.  
medscape.com
almost 6 years ago
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23

Seizure, “Answers”

1. Which benzodiazepine do you prefer for the treatment of status epilepticus (SE)? Which do you prefer for pediatric patients? An epileptic seizure (ES) is defined as an abrupt disruption in brain function secondary to abnormal neuronal firing, and is characterized by changes in sensory perception and or motor activity. The clinical manifestation of a…  
emlyceum.com
almost 6 years ago
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12

Mental disorders and physical diseases co-occur in teenagers

Every third teenager has suffered from one mental disorder and one physical disease. These co-occurrences come in specific associations: More often than average, depression occurs together with diseases of the digestive system, eating disorders with seizures and anxiety disorders together with arthritis, heart disease as well as diseases of the digestives system. These findings were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the scientific journal Psychosomatic Medicine  
eurekalert.org
almost 6 years ago
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12

Lab Case 55 – Interpretation

2. AMS – seizure, trauma, alcohol intoxication/withdrawal/ Wernicke’s, severe hyponatraemia, sepsis (intracranial/ other), drugs/ toxins, CVA etc  
emergucate.com
almost 6 years ago
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Lab Case 56 – Interpretation

<10%  Background level in smoker 10%     mild H 20%     dizziness, N, dyspnoea, throbbing headache 30%     Vertigo, ataxia, visual disturbance 40%     confusion, coma, seizures, syncope 50%     CVS, Respiratory failure, arrhythmia, seizures, death  
emergucate.com
over 5 years ago
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14

A Girl with Seizures - Now@NEJM

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 9-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with loss of consciousness and a seizure. She had returned from a trip to Puerto Rico 3 weeks earlier. Unilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy was present, and rapidly progressive encephalopathy developed.  
blogs.nejm.org
over 5 years ago
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11

The use of lacosamide in partial epilepsy: Does it work and is it harmful? | Cochrane

Lacosamide is an antiepileptic drug that can be added along with others to treat people who have certain types of epileptic seizures. This drug may be beneficial for people who are taking other antiepileptic medication but continue to have seizures. This review looked at how well lacosamide works when added to a patient's daily medication and also looked at some of the harms or side effects of the drug.  
cochrane.org
over 5 years ago
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14

Surgery for epilepsy | Cochrane

Focal epilepsies are caused by abnormal electrical discharges in specific (localised) parts of the brain. In most people the resulting epileptic seizures can be controlled with medication. In up to 30% of people these seizures are not controlled by medication. If the site of origin of these signals (the epileptogenic zone) can be located from the description of the seizures, or from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (a medical imaging scan that uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body) and electroencephalography (EEG) findings (recording of electrical activity along the scalp) the person should be offered the chance of having the epileptogenic zone removed. We studied the factors (characteristics of the people undergoing surgery and details of surgery type) that might be linked to the best chance of surgical cure of epileptic seizures.  
cochrane.org
over 5 years ago
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Are there any differences in survival between people with low grade glioma having early compared with delayed radiotherapy at the time of progression? | Cochrane

The issue Low grade gliomas are brain tumours that predominantly affect young adults. They grow at slower rates and are typically associated with a favourable prognosis compared with high grade gliomas. One of the most common presenting symptoms of people with LGG are seizures. Although, there are no definitive guidelines on the management of LGGs, most people with LGGs are treated with a combination of surgery followed by radiotherapy. However, it is unclear whether to use radiotherapy in the early postoperative period, or to delay until the disease progresses.  
cochrane.org
over 5 years ago
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Carbamazepine versus phenobarbitone monotherapy (single drug treatment) for epilepsy | Cochrane

Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in which abnormal electrical discharges from the brain cause recurrent seizures. We studied two types of epileptic seizures in this review: generalised onset seizures in which electrical discharges begin in one part of the brain and move throughout the brain, and partial onset seizures in which the seizure is generated in and affects one part of the brain (the whole hemisphere of the brain or part of a lobe of the brain). For around 70% of people with epilepsy, a single antiepileptic drug can control generalised onset or partial onset seizures. Worldwide, phenobarbitone (PB) and carbamazepine (CBZ) are commonly used antiepileptic drugs; however, CBZ is used more commonly in the USA and Europe because of concerns over side-effects associated with PB, particularly concerns over behavioural changes in children treated with PB. Phenobarbitone is still commonly used in developing countries in Africa, Asia, and South America because of the low cost of the drug.  
cochrane.org
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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18

A pain in the neck type of headache

A 29 year old right hand dominant chef presented to the emergency department with a four day history of feeling “not normal.” He was sent home from work because of a gradual onset of dull pain on the left side of his neck radiating up into his head, which was getting progressively worse, as well as “seeing two of everything.” The pain was not influenced by changes in posture. In addition, his right side felt numb and he was dropping things at work. He felt unsteady on his feet, which prompted him to seek medical advice. He thought all his symptoms had come on suddenly and were gradually getting worse. He denied any recent alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, seizure activity, head injury, or loss of consciousness. He had no medical history of note, apart from hypothyroidism, for which he was taking thyroxine.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 5 years ago