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Facial Pain

Sinusitis Clinical features Dull constant aching pain over the maxillary sinus Tenderness over underlying skin Postnasal drip Ethmoid/sphenoid a pain felt deep in the midline at the root of the nose Pain is worse on bending Pain usually lasts 1-2 weeks and is often associated with symptoms of a cold (coryza)    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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3
52

Fifth Disease

Fifth Disease - so called as it was the fifth of the six common childhood skin rashes when it was first classified back in the 18th and 19th centuries. Formally known as Erythema Infectiosum and also colloquially called slapped cheek syndrome. Aietiology and Epidemiology  Caused by infection with Parvovirus B19 (aka erythrovirus)    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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1
30

Immunotherapy Patch for Crohn's Disease?

Immunotherapy through the skin might have applications beyond food allergies, with research getting underway for treatment of Crohn's disease.  
medpagetoday.com
over 5 years ago
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1
12

Stem cells cloned from human adults may lead to patient-specific medical treatment

A team of scientists have used cloning methods to produce stem cells from the skin cells of adult patients. To do this, researchers extracted DNA from the cells of two adult males, aged 35 and 75....  
The Verge
over 5 years ago
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0
26

Human skin grown in lab 'can replace animal testing' - BBC News

Skin grown in the laboratory could replace animals in drug and cosmetics testing, according to UK scientists.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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1
31

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
22

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
19

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
53

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
15

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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1
22

6. Skin Lesion Biopsy [Basic Surgery Skills]

Watch the complete series of videos: http://doctorprodigious.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/basic-surgery-skills-royal-college-of-surgeons/  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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0
15

Defenses Against Candida Species

Animation Description: Candida species can be readily found on the skin, in the genital tract and on the epithelial surface of the gastrointestinal tract. To...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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A woman with a sore spot on her leg

A 41 year old civil servant, with a background of poorly controlled Crohn’s disease, presented to her general practitioner with a skin lesion on her left shin that had been there for eight weeks (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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A woman with a sore spot on her leg

A 41 year old civil servant, with a background of poorly controlled Crohn’s disease, presented to her general practitioner with a skin lesion on her left shin that had been there for eight weeks (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
16

A woman with a sore spot on her leg

A 41 year old civil servant, with a background of poorly controlled Crohn’s disease, presented to her general practitioner with a skin lesion on her left shin that had been there for eight weeks (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
2
15

A woman with a sore spot on her leg

A 41 year old civil servant, with a background of poorly controlled Crohn’s disease, presented to her general practitioner with a skin lesion on her left shin that had been there for eight weeks (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
11

A woman with a sore spot on her leg

A 41 year old civil servant, with a background of poorly controlled Crohn’s disease, presented to her general practitioner with a skin lesion on her left shin that had been there for eight weeks (fig 1⇓).  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
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Shotgun Histology Thick Skin

Shotgun Histology Thick Skin  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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1
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Shotgun Histology Thin Skin

Shotgun Histology Thin Skin  
YouTube
about 5 years ago