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Differences in Mechanosensory Discrimination Across the Body Surface - Neuroscience - NCBI Bookshelf

The accuracy with which tactile stimuli can be sensed varies from one region of the body to another, a phenomenon that illustrates some further principles of somatic sensation. Figure 9.4 shows the results of an experiment in which variation in tactile ability across the body surface was measured by two-point discrimination. This technique measures the minimal interstimulus distance required to perceive two simultaneously applied stimuli as distinct (the indentations of the points of a pair of calipers, for example). When applied to the skin, such stimuli of the fingertips are discretely perceived if they are only 2 mm apart. In contrast, the same stimuli applied to the forearm are not perceived as distinct until they are at least 40 mm apart! This marked regional difference in tactile ability is explained by the fact that the encapsulated mechanoreceptors that respond to the stimuli are three to four times more numerous in the fingertips than in other areas of the hand, and many times more dense than in the forearm. Equally important in this regional difference are the sizes of the neuronal receptive fields. The receptive field of a somatic sensory neuron is the region of the skin within which a tactile stimulus evokes a sensory response in the cell or its axon (Boxes A and B). Analysis of the human hand shows that the receptive fields of mechanosensory neurons are 1–2 mm in diameter on the fingertips but 5–10 mm on the palms. The receptive fields on the arm are larger still. The importance of receptive field size is easy to envision. If, for instance, the receptive fields of all cutaneous receptor neurons covered the entire digital pad, it would be impossible to discriminate two spatially separate stimuli applied to the fingertip (since all the receptive fields would be returning the same spatial information). Figure 9.4Variation in the sensitivity of tactile discrimination as a function of location on the body surface, measured here by two-point discrimination. (After Weinstein, 1969.)  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
over 6 years ago
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Rutosides for prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome | Cochrane

Blood clots in the veins of the leg are a common problem and are termed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One in three patients with a DVT develops a complication known as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). This syndrome involves ongoing swelling of the affected leg, pain, and also skin changes. At the current time the main way of preventing PTS is to wear compression stockings. However, it is known that patients frequently find the stocking uncomfortable and would prefer to take an oral medication to prevent the problem.  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago
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Is anyone else having problems bathing? – UPDATE

I have now tested Nilaqua in the ward, we are testing the shampoo and body wash. I knew one of my patients family were visiting so I decided it would be a good time to test the product. I used the shampoo on Jean, as I said in my previous post it is really easy to use and leaves the hair soft and clean, removing any signs of grease and dirt. Jean was very pleased and said that it felt and smelt nice. I hadn't used the body wash before but again, it was very easy to use, much easier than bed bathing, I didn't have to change any sheets after use and it saves a lot of time. This meant that I had more time to wash more patients and give a few of them the luxury of a hair wash. The body wash uses the same method as the shampoo – apply, massage into the skin until soapy and towel away the liquid with that off comes the dirt and odours. It works really well and is definitely cost effective whilst giving high quality care that this people deserve.  
Yasmin Booth
over 6 years ago
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Is it possible to decrease MRSA carriage by putting antibiotics in your nose?

It is estimated that up to 15-30% of the human population in developed countries are colonized by the community acquired strains of methicillin resistant staph aureus. The risk of developing a skin infection in the year following discovery of colonized status is approximately 1-in-4. Autoinfection rates are between 76-86% – thus most people that get MRSA infections get it from themselves.  
pemcincinnati.com
over 6 years ago
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SGEM#131: Gimme Some Antibiotics for Uncomplicated Skin Infections

Case: A 26-year-old male presents to your emergency department with complaints of a painful, reddened area on his right arm. He has no significant past medical history, surgical history, or social history, but reports that he has an allergic reaction to penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics.  
thesgem.com
over 6 years ago
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Self-Contamination High Among Healthcare Workers

Healthcare workers often contaminate their own skin and clothing when removing contaminated gloves or gowns, mandating educational tools including practice with immediate visual feedback.  
medscape.com
over 6 years ago