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Stanley Schachter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stanley Schachter (April 15, 1922 – June 7, 1997) was an American social psychologist, who is perhaps best known for his development of the two factor theory of emotion in 1962 along with Jerome E. Singer. In his theory he states that emotions have two ingredients: physiological arousal and a cognitive label. A person's experience of an emotion stems from the mental awareness of the body's physical arousal. Schachter also studied and published a large number of works on the subjects of obesity, group dynamics, birth order and smoking. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Schachter as the seventh most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[1]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 4 years ago
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PA system to stop smoking at Hywel Dda hospitals - BBC News

A PA system is launched at hospitals in mid and west Wales to discourage smokers from lighting up.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Smoking, Weight Gain Barriers to Remission in Early RA

Smoking and obesity have again been singled out as reasons that early measures to control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might fail.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Marijuana, Tobacco in Pregnancy May Compound Risks

Smoking both marijuana and tobacco during pregnancy may create greater health risks than cigarettes alone, according to a recent U.S. study.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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High Schoolers' Cigarette Use Hits Lowest Level Since 1991

A national survey of youth behaviors showed traditional smoking is down to 11%, but now 24% of teenagers use e-cigarettes. Almost half said they texted or emailed while driving; 30% report having sex.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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'Strongest Evidence to Date' Ties Maternal Smoking to Psychosis

A Finnish population-based study links prenatal nicotine exposure to increased risk for schizophrenia in young adult offspring.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Cigarette Smoking Among Urban American Indian Adults — Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, Minnesota, 2011 | MMWR

The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  
cdc.gov
over 4 years ago
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Not walking at work could be 'as dangerous as smoking' - BBC News

New data suggests more than half of us only go for a walk at work when we need the toilet.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Axa stubs out €1.7bn tobacco industry investment - BBC News

Axa, one of the world's biggest insurers, plans to stop investing in the tobacco industry to help highlight the human and economic cost of smoking.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Nicotine has deleterious effects on wound healing through increased vasoconstriction

Regarding your article supporting the use of e-cigarettes,1 we wholeheartedly endorse any measure that reduces public health harm from smoking. The appropriateness of requiring patients to stop smoking before elective surgery has …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Long-term Smoking and the Brain: No Neurodegenerative Effects

Contrary to previous reports, cigarette smoking does not have any neurodegenerative effects on the brain, either alone or in association with alcohol abuse, new research shows.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Lean for Life Linked to Lowest Mortality, With Some Nuances

Researchers looked at optimal BMI number for lowest risk and how that has changed over past decades, as well as effect of weight trends over a lifetime and the impact of smoking, other comorbidities.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Body mass index and mortality: understanding the patterns and paradoxes

The optimal body mass index (BMI) associated with lowest risk of all cause mortality is not known. As excess adiposity increases risk of conditions such as diabetes that reduce life expectancy, one might expect increasing BMI to be associated with increasing mortality. However, compared with normal weight, underweight is associated with increased mortality and modestly elevated BMI is associated with lower mortality. The former pattern is only partly explained by confounding by smoking or comorbidity, and the second observation has been called the obesity paradox.1 In addition, the influence on mortality of different patterns of weight change throughout the life course is poorly understood. Two linked papers attempt to shed light on these important subjects.2 3  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Body mass index and mortality: understanding the patterns and paradoxes

The optimal body mass index (BMI) associated with lowest risk of all cause mortality is not known. As excess adiposity increases risk of conditions such as diabetes that reduce life expectancy, one might expect increasing BMI to be associated with increasing mortality. However, compared with normal weight, underweight is associated with increased mortality and modestly elevated BMI is associated with lower mortality. The former pattern is only partly explained by confounding by smoking or comorbidity, and the second observation has been called the obesity paradox.1 In addition, the influence on mortality of different patterns of weight change throughout the life course is poorly understood. Two linked papers attempt to shed light on these important subjects.2 3  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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0
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Body mass index and mortality: understanding the patterns and paradoxes

The optimal body mass index (BMI) associated with lowest risk of all cause mortality is not known. As excess adiposity increases risk of conditions such as diabetes that reduce life expectancy, one might expect increasing BMI to be associated with increasing mortality. However, compared with normal weight, underweight is associated with increased mortality and modestly elevated BMI is associated with lower mortality. The former pattern is only partly explained by confounding by smoking or comorbidity, and the second observation has been called the obesity paradox.1 In addition, the influence on mortality of different patterns of weight change throughout the life course is poorly understood. Two linked papers attempt to shed light on these important subjects.2 3  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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FDA Campaign Aims to Help Young LGBT Adults Stop Smoking

A $35.7 million campaign, initiated by the FDA, aims to help young adult lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered persons stop smoking.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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More Evidence That Smoking Worsens Semen Quality

A new review using updated World Health Organization criteria for laboratory examination of semen confirms that smoking has bad effects on sperm.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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e-Cigarettes: More Good Than Harm?

Rather than viewing e-cigarettes as a 'gateway' to smoking, their potential benefit for harm reduction should be taken into account when developing policies to control their use, experts say.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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E-cigarettes are a “gateway from smoking,” RCP concludes

Smokers should be actively encouraged to swap their tobacco cigarettes for electronic cigarettes because “vaping” is much safer than smoking and is likely to benefit UK public health, a report from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) says.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Smokers and overweight patients are denied surgery, royal college finds

Over a third of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England are restricting access to routine surgery such as hip and knee replacements until patients stop smoking or lose weight, a report by the Royal College of Surgeons has found.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago