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SpinalStenosis

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3
98

Inverted reflex in spinal stenosis

Recorded on my iPhone - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/dr-tom-wascher with the Ustream Mobile App  
MRCP Videos
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
0
22

Physical therapy is as effective as surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis, study finds

Surgical decompression treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis is no better than physical therapy in improving symptoms and function, a randomised controlled trial has shown.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
18

Physical therapy is as effective as surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis, study finds

Surgical decompression treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis is no better than physical therapy in improving symptoms and function, a randomised controlled trial has shown.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
13

Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis

Recent trends in spine surgery, such as endoscopic and other “micro” techniques, promised less invasive procedures and better outcomes compared with conventional open techniques for decompressing nerves. Minimally invasive techniques are popular with patients, promoted by industry, and increasingly used by surgeons.1 However, recent studies have failed to report any clear benefits for patients.2 Is our hunger for new techniques based on little more than a gut feeling that new and smaller is always better and, if so, is it ethically justifiable to “test” these new techniques on patients? In a linked paper (doi:10.1136/bmj.h1603) Nerland and colleagues provide some hard evidence to help inform these important debates.3  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
12

Minimally invasive decompression versus open laminectomy for central stenosis of the lumbar spine: pragmatic comparative effectiveness study

Objective To test the equivalence for clinical effectiveness between microdecompression and laminectomy in patients with central lumbar spinal stenosis.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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0
27

Physical therapy as effective as surgery for lumber spinal stenosis

Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) who followed an evidence-based, standardized physical therapy (PT) regimen achieved similar symptom relief and improvements in physical functioning as...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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0
18

Similar outcomes in spinal stenosis 8 years after surgical or non-surgical treatment

For patients with spinal stenosis, long-term outcomes are comparable with surgery or conservative treatment, reports a study in the January 15 issue of Spine.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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0
22

Commonly prescribed painkiller not effective in controlling lower back pain

A new study in the journal Neurology shows that pregabalin is not effective in controlling the pain associated with lumbar spinal stenosis, the most common type of chronic lower back pain...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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0
3

Steroid Shots Offer Little Relief for Some Low Back Pain

Corticosteroid injections are commonly and increasingly used to treat radiculopathy and spinal stenosis, but their value is limited, a meta-analysis suggests.  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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0
1

Surgery for Your Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients? Maybe Not

The largest study to date comparing the long-term outcomes of surgery vs nonsurgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis found no significant difference in benefits after 8 years.  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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0
30

Body Mass Index and Risk for Clinical Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Is obesity associated with a higher risk of developing lumbar spinal stenosis? A new study looks at the role BMI may play in the development of this condition.  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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0

Ambulatory Surgery Trends in Disc Disorders, Spinal Stenosis

A new study examines the practice patterns of ambulatory spine surgery for intervertebral disc disorders and spinal stenosis. What are the trends?  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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0
6

Management of lumbar spinal stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200 000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

Management of lumbar spinal stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200 000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 4 years ago
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1

Decision Support Helps With Spinal Stenosis Treatment Choice

A decision support intervention could help patients determine the best course of treatment for spinal stenosis.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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0
1

Fusion adds little value to decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis, studies show

Fusion of affected vertebrae in treating lumbar spinal stenosis achieves no improvement in clinical outcomes, including disability due to low back pain, when compared with decompression surgery, the results of two randomised trials have shown.1 2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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0
1

Fusion adds little value to decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis, studies show

Fusion of affected vertebrae in treating lumbar spinal stenosis achieves no improvement in clinical outcomes, including disability due to low back pain, when compared with decompression surgery, the results of two randomised trials have shown.1 2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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0
3

Fusion Adds Little to Laminectomy for Lumbar Stenosis

Adding spinal fusion to decompression laminectomy did not improve outcomes for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, even if they also had degenerative spondylolisthesis.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
12ca5cca308a36a67138a7d80bf438ccd71d0e0f3159822881651433
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3233

What is Spinal Stenosis?

Spinal stenosis is a condition in which the spinal canal narrows and pinches the nerves, resulting in back and leg pain. Spinal stenosis often occurs in older adults, although younger people who are born with a small spinal canal may also develop symptoms.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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4

IPD Reoperation Rates Still Hamper Benefit in Spinal Stenosis

The latest randomized trial again shows similar outcomes to surgery with a percutaneous interspinous process device in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, but with increased reintervention.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago