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8
3
41

Focus On: Thrombolytic Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke

Initial management of the stroke patient in the emergency department requires prompt evaluation and stabilization.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
13
1
36

Brain Attack--Controversies in acute stroke management

<p>Treating acute stroke beyond the 3 hour window.</p <p>A discussion of the history of thrombolytics in acute stroke, current literature and an interview with Providence Stroke Center director Dr. Ted Lowenkopf.</p>  
Rob Orman, MD
over 8 years ago
11
1
25

Lightning Injuries

<p>Lightning injuries are rare, but when you do treat a patient they can have facinating presentations.&nbsp;&nbsp; This lecture follows a patient we treated at Vanderbilt.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The patient present to a local ED with stroke like symptoms following the lightning strike.&nbsp;&nbsp; Initially, physicians were confused by the presentation, but in this lecture you will learn that his presentation was near textbook. <a href="http://www.burndoc.com/">www.burndoc.com</a></p <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 8 years ago
8
3
127

Altered Level of Consciousness

<p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">This episode covers an approach to children with altered level of consciousness. &nbsp;We present an approach to the initial management in these cases, with a focus on the ABC and DFG approach. Investigations and imaging are discussed. Some specific causes of altered LOC are covered. &nbsp;This episode was written by Peter MacPherson and Dr. Melanie Lewis. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta and Stollery Children's Hospital. She is also the Clerkship Director.&nbsp;</span></p <p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">~~~</span></p <p><!--StartFragment--></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Times;"><span style="font-size: small;"> <!--StartFragment--> </span></span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Differential Diagnosis of Altered Level of Consciousness:</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">1) Structural causes: cerebrovascular accident, cerebral vein thrombosis, hydrocephalus, intracerebral tumor, subdural empyema, trauma (intracranial hemorrhage, diffuse cerebral swelling, abusive head trauma/shaken baby syndrome)</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">2) Medical causes: anoxia, diabetic ketoacidosis, electrolyte abnormality, encephalopathy, hypoglycemia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, infection (sepsis), inborn errors of metabolism, intussusception, meningitis or encephalitis, psychogenic, postictal state, toxins, uremia (hemolytic-uremic syndrome)</span></p <div style="border: none; border-bottom: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;" <p class="MsoNormal" style="border: none; mso-border-bottom-alt: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in; mso-padding-alt: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Adapted from: Avner J (2006) Altered states of consciousness. <em>Pediatr Rev</em></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> 27: 331-338.</span></p </div <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Pedscases.Com
over 8 years ago
8
1
17

MTPC1 2007 | Case 07 presented by William G Reeves, MD

MeetTheProfessors.com – 84yo 3-cm tumor w/penetration of muscularis, 1/15 positive nodes, underwent right hemicolectomy; caretaker of wife who suffered a stroke; rcvd 6mo adj cape, contd care for wife, doing well 12mo later  
Dr Neil Love
over 8 years ago
Preview
8
171

Stroke & Balint's syndrome

The presentation given to my tutorial group for my second year dissertation on types of stroke and the interesting resulting effects on visual perception.  
Daniel Sapier
about 8 years ago
29974
11
334

Stroke tutorial

This is a tutorial about the recognition, presentation, pathophysiology and management of stroke.  
Dr Alastair Buick
almost 8 years ago
Preview
9
110

Cerebrovascular Accidents

This is a presentation put together by several students in my year (second year medics at University of Liverpool) discussing the anatomy of the brain, pathophysiology of a CVA, differential diagnoses and causes of CVA, investigations and case presentations authors: - mollie rowley - tim sale - nikki trebley - zeenat umerji - rosie vincent - ella ward  
Mary
over 6 years ago
Preview
4
185

Stroke: Hypertensive haemorrhage - radiology video tutorial (MRI, CT)

"Stroke Series" video 1 of 7: Hypertensive haemorrhage and lobar haemorrhage are two distinct forms of haemorrhagic stroke. This video discusses the imaging characteristics of hypertensive haemorrhage, the underlying pathology (Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms) and the relevant differential diagnosis.  
Radiopaedia
about 6 years ago
Preview
4
104

Stroke: Lobar haemorrhage - radiology video tutorial (MRI, CT)

"Stroke Series" video 2 of 7: Lobar haemorrhage and hypertensive haemorrhage are two distinct forms of haemorrhagic stroke. This video discusses the imaging characteristics of primary lobar haemorrhage, the underlying pathology (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) and the relevant differential diagnosis.  
Radiopaedia
about 6 years ago
Preview
4
184

Stroke: Acute infarction - radiology video tutorial (CT, MRI, angiography)

"Stroke Series" video 3 of 7: Acute ischaemic stroke. Presented by Neuroradiologist Dr Frank Gaillard.  
Radiopaedia
about 6 years ago
Preview
3
94

Coronary artery stents in Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is the condition in which an artery wall thickens as the result of a build-up of fatty materials such as cholesterol.It most commonly becomes seriously symptomatic when interfering with the coronary circulation supplying the heart or cerebral circulation supplying the brain, and is considered the most important underlying cause of strokes, heart attacks, and most cardiovascular diseases, in general. A stent is a man-made 'tube' inserted into a natural passage/conduit in the body to prevent, or counteract, a disease-induced, localized flow constriction. Stents are used to counter narrowing of arteries due to plaque deposition and hardening.  
Nicole Chalmers
about 5 years ago
10
7
167

ECG Interpretation - Atrial Fibrillation & Flutter

http://www.acadoodle.com Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. In this condition, chaotic electrical impulses, generated from multiple sites within the atria and pulmonary veins, result in irregular depolarisation of the ventricles with a resulting irregularly irregular heartbeat. Recognition of atrial fibrillation on the ECG is a crucial skill as the arrhythmia increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. These complications are preventable with appropriate treatment. Atrial flutter is a common arrhythmia which arises by a very specific mechanism. This arrhythmia is easily missed on the ECG. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
59

Stroke

Stroke Stroke is a sudden onset of brain dysfunction, caused by an alteration in cerebrovascular blood supply. It is characterised by: Rapid, acute onset – within a few minutes Focal neurological defect – almost always some sort of hemiplegia, with/without other focal neurological signs  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
27

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
24

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
17

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
32

What is the most effective operation for adults with severe and complex obesity?

Accessing, undergoing, and achieving a successful outcome from surgery for “severe and complex obesity” is difficult and requires determination and effort. Here, we consider “severe and complex obesity” to mean that an individual’s health is compromised by his or her weight to the extent that surgery can be considered to be an appropriate option.1 Surgery may be offered to adults with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥40, or a BMI of ≥35 with an obesity related disease, and it can be very successful. An average 50% of excess weight may be lost in the first few years after surgery, and if this is sustained it is associated with long term reduction in overall mortality and decreased incidences of diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke and cancer.1 2 This treatment, however, requires careful consideration and serious commitment, with the need to demonstrate full engagement in a structured weight loss programme, to have tried all appropriate non-invasive measures of weight loss, and persevered for referral to a specialist surgical team.1 Once surgery is approved it is necessary to choose which operation to undergo.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
24

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
16

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago