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WHO | Noncommunicable diseases prematurely take 16 million lives annually, WHO urges more action

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely – before the age of 70 – from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report.  
who.int
over 4 years ago
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9

Endovascular treatment for large vessel stroke

Stream Endovascular treatment for large vessel stroke by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
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14

CT perfusion-guided patient selection for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke

Stream CT perfusion-guided patient selection for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Static.www.bmj
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Folic acid significantly reduces risk of first stroke, large Chinese study finds

The use of folic acid for the primary prevention of stroke, particularly among populations with low folate levels, is supported by a large randomised controlled trial reported in JAMA.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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HRT increases risk of blood clots and stroke, finds new analysis

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) offers women no protection against having or dying from a myocardial infarction while increasing the risk of blood clots and stroke, a new analysis published by the Cochrane Collaboration has shown.1  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Static.www.bmj
1
3

Folic acid significantly reduces risk of first stroke, large Chinese study finds

The use of folic acid for the primary prevention of stroke, particularly among populations with low folate levels, is supported by a large randomised controlled trial reported in JAMA.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
7

HRT increases risk of blood clots and stroke, finds new analysis

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) offers women no protection against having or dying from a myocardial infarction while increasing the risk of blood clots and stroke, a new analysis published by the Cochrane Collaboration has shown.1  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
7

The FAST tool is effective but not for posterior fossa stroke

Hankey and Blacker’s article provides a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of stroke.1 However, an important issue is the failure of the FAST (face, arm, speech, and time) tool to detect posterior fossa strokes in some patients, who might then not be triaged …  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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1
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NHS health checks are totally unscientific

It is difficult, well nigh impossible, to undo an ineffective programme after it has been set up. Those involved—the government in this case—automatically adopt a defensive position so as not to disappoint the people they have promised to help. They promise “risk assessment” to help prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, kidney disease, and …  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
20

Orthopaedic surgery can transform the lives of adults with spasticity

Surgery has a role in managing spasticity in adults.1 We run a monthly clinic for adult patients with spasticity after stroke, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, and cerebral palsy. Several surgical procedures improve the quality of such patients’ lives, including wrist fusions, …  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Static.www.bmj
1
32

Management of spasticity in the face of multimorbidity

The clinical review on managing spasticity in adults is important for both primary and secondary care clinicians.1 Most patients with troublesome spasticity from conditions such as stroke and multiple sclerosis have other associated long term conditions. Multimorbidity is now the norm in clinical practice,2 including neurological rehabilitation, geriatrics, and primary care.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
12

The management of spasticity in adults

Spasticity is a frequent and debilitating feature of common neurological conditions such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
14

The management of spasticity in adults

Spasticity is a frequent and debilitating feature of common neurological conditions such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

Focal neurological deficits after trauma

A 38 year old woman developed headache (without neck pain) and weakness of her left upper and lower limbs after a concussive head trauma with scalp lacerations in a motor vehicle crash. On examination (more than 4.5 hours after the trauma), she was conscious, alert, and in cardiac sinus rhythm. There was no carotid bruit. She scored 7 points on the National Institute of Health stroke scale (maximum possible score 42). Positive neurological findings included mild blunting of the left nasolabial fold; left hemiparesis, with extensor muscles being weaker (3/5) than flexors in the left upper limb (4+/5), flexors being weaker (4 to 4+/5) than extensors in the left lower limb (4+ to 5/5), and distal more than proximal weakness in the left arm and leg. She also had brisk deep tendon reflexes in the limbs on the left side; a left extensor plantar response; left hemianopia; and left hemisensory (including the face) hypoaesthesia for pain, cold, and touch. Eyelid ptosis or paresis of extraocular movements were not present, and pupillary size and light reaction were normal.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
0

NHS health checks are totally unscientific

It is difficult, well nigh impossible, to undo an ineffective programme after it has been set up. Those involved—the government in this case—automatically adopt a defensive position so as not to disappoint the people they have promised to help. They promise “risk assessment” to help prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, kidney disease, and …  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
3
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36

Do thromboembolic strokes cause loss of vision in just one eye?

I am trying to work out when thromboembolic strokes would cause loss of vision in just one eye because it seems to be that most of the time is causes homonymous hemianopia. Anyone got an ideas? Thanks!  
Katy Kershaw
almost 7 years ago
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42

What sort of stroke causes truncal ataxia?

I saw a patient with truncal ataxia (I read it in the notes) but was not sure what sort of stroke would cause this and couldn't find out from the notes where the lesion would be.  
Mark Ward
almost 7 years ago
13
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How does a patent Foramen Ovale increase the risk of stroke?

I heard yesterday that a patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) increases the risk of stroke - why would it? Is it that the turbulence from the PFO or possible damage on the endocardium causes small emboli to come off from here or is it that clots pass through the PFO. Also, I hadn't heard this before so is it actually true and / or a risk factor. Any help would be great.  
Martyn Freeman
almost 7 years ago
3
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What is the difference in initial treatment in patients with acute stroke and TIA?

I know the difference between stroke and TIA is that a stroke lasts longer than 24 hours and a TIA resolves within 24 hours, but what happens if a patient with a TIA presents before their symptoms resolve? Would they be treated as a stroke patient since the medical team wouldn't know it was going to turn out to be a TIA? Thanks!  
Naomi Adelson
over 6 years ago
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Does hypertension correlate more with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease or stroke?

Does hypertension correlate more with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease or stroke? What's the answer and is there a reason why?  
James Wong
over 5 years ago