New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
0
9

Firearms regulation and male suicide in Quebec

Stream Firearms regulation and male suicide in Quebec by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
6

Suicide: Sailing on Uncertain Seas - Broome Docs

suicide suicidal emergency psychiatry  
broomedocs.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
1

Doctor should be able to help dying man commit suicide, rules South African judge

A South African High Court judge has ruled in favour of a dying man’s wish to be assisted in his suicide by a doctor. Robin Stransham-Ford, who was 65, had prostate cancer and had only a few weeks to live. He died, however, of “natural causes,” said a statement released by his family before he learnt of his court victory.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
9

Doctor should be able to help dying man commit suicide, rules South African judge

A South African High Court judge has ruled in favour of a dying man’s wish to be assisted in his suicide by a doctor. Robin Stransham-Ford, who was 65, had prostate cancer and had only a few weeks to live. He died, however, of “natural causes,” said a statement released by his family before he learnt of his court victory.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
8

Safety of psychotropic drugs in pregnancy

Mental illness in pregnancy is common—around 10% of women experience a major depressive illness or anxiety disorder,1 and an increasing number of women with psychotic disorders are able to conceive owing to the decreased use of antipsychotics with prolactin raising properties.2 Women who have severe mental illness in the perinatal period are at risk of considerable psychological morbidity, including suicide,2 but they often discontinue psychotropics,3 largely because of concerns about safety.4 Evidence on the risks of drugs from observational data is limited and contradictory, with important methodological limitations due to bias, confounding, and small sample sizes.5 In two linked papers in this issue, Furu and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h17986 and Vigod and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h2298)7 tackle some of these limitations by using novel methods to reduce confounding in large linked datasets, and thus provide a valuable addition to the evidence base on the safety of psychotropic drugs in pregnancy.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
4

Safety of psychotropic drugs in pregnancy

Mental illness in pregnancy is common—around 10% of women experience a major depressive illness or anxiety disorder,1 and an increasing number of women with psychotic disorders are able to conceive owing to the decreased use of antipsychotics with prolactin raising properties.2 Women who have severe mental illness in the perinatal period are at risk of considerable psychological morbidity, including suicide,2 but they often discontinue psychotropics,3 largely because of concerns about safety.4 Evidence on the risks of drugs from observational data is limited and contradictory, with important methodological limitations due to bias, confounding, and small sample sizes.5 In two linked papers in this issue, Furu and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h17986 and Vigod and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h2298)7 tackle some of these limitations by using novel methods to reduce confounding in large linked datasets, and thus provide a valuable addition to the evidence base on the safety of psychotropic drugs in pregnancy.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
6

Safety of psychotropic drugs in pregnancy

Mental illness in pregnancy is common—around 10% of women experience a major depressive illness or anxiety disorder,1 and an increasing number of women with psychotic disorders are able to conceive owing to the decreased use of antipsychotics with prolactin raising properties.2 Women who have severe mental illness in the perinatal period are at risk of considerable psychological morbidity, including suicide,2 but they often discontinue psychotropics,3 largely because of concerns about safety.4 Evidence on the risks of drugs from observational data is limited and contradictory, with important methodological limitations due to bias, confounding, and small sample sizes.5 In two linked papers in this issue, Furu and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h17986 and Vigod and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.h2298)7 tackle some of these limitations by using novel methods to reduce confounding in large linked datasets, and thus provide a valuable addition to the evidence base on the safety of psychotropic drugs in pregnancy.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
8

Health boss warns GPs risking mental health and suicide - BBC News

The number of GPs seeking help for work-related stress and mental health problems is increasing, according to the former head of the Royal College of GPs.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

'Why my partner Gill Pharaoh chose a suicide clinic' - BBC News

John Southall, the partner of Gill Pharaoh, who ended her life in a Swiss suicide clinic, explains how she reached her decision.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
9

Gill Pharaoh's decision to attend suicide clinic defended - BBC News

A retired nurse from London who travelled to Switzerland to end her life saw the "indignity" of ageing, her partner says.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Pre-suicide symptoms identified by researchers - BBC News

An international study says it has identified common behaviour patterns which often precede suicide attempts.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Suicide-risk behaviour patterns identified - study - BBC News

Depressed people who display "risky behaviour", agitation and impulsivity are at least 50% more likely to attempt suicide, a study finds.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

This assisted dying bill is unsafe and unworkable | Tanni Grey-Thompson

I urge MPs when they debate the bill on Friday to understand how this proposed shift in the law on suicide would affect people at their most vulnerable  
theguardian.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
6

ACP to Jerry Brown: Veto Physician-Assisted Suicide Bill

Don't allow 'medicalization of suicide'  
medpagetoday.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

The Ask Suicide-Screening Questions

All patients presenting with mental health concerns should be screened for suicide. Many EDs also screen patients presenting for other reasons as well. There are many “screens” and one simple one that is used locally and can be effective in your setting is the ASQ – The Ask Suicide-Screening Questions. It is really straightforward, includes only 5-questions, and should be asked to the patient in confidence if possible. Positive answers should be responded with immediate referral to appropriate mental health services:  
pemcincinnati.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Blocking Access to Suicide 'Hot Spots' Stops Many Attempts

Blocking access to suicide 'hot spots,' along with other prevention strategies, helps reduce majority of suicide attempts in popular suicide settings.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Maharashtra government launches mental health programme to reduce suicide in farmers

The Maharashtra government is set to launch a programme with a budget of 7.6 crore rupees (£760 000; €1.03m; $1.16m) to identify farmers with depression, to help stem the rising number of suicides among agricultural workers.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Young Men at Much Higher Risk for Suicide Than Young Women

Young men are far more likely to commit suicide than young women across all racial/ethnic groups in the United States.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Ketamine and other glutamate receptor modulators for bipolar depression | Cochrane

Bipolar disorder is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders, which is characterised by a chronic pattern of relapse into mania (abnormally elevated mood or irritability and related symptoms with severe functional impairment or psychotic symptoms for seven days or more), or hypomania (same symptoms with decreased or increased function for four days or more) and major depression. The depressive phase of the illness is associated with a greatly increased risk of self harm and suicide. Current treatments for depressive symptoms are of limited efficacy and onset of action is generally slow. Among the most promising alternatives with a different mechanism of action, is a new class of drugs, called glutamate receptor modulators. New compounds have been tested, mainly in unipolar depression, but recent studies have focused on bipolar depression. There are some recent reviews that have tried to summarise the evidence about glutamate receptor modulators, but they either focused only on ketamine or did not include relevant data from the most recent trials. For these reasons, a comprehensive and updated synthesis of all the available studies is needed.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago