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14
438

Easy way to draw the cervical triangles of the neck

Simple way to draw the cervical triangles of the neck. Hope it helps! If not, good luck finding somewhere else!  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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13
272

A Rough Guide to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

A rough guide to abdominal aortic aneurysms By Nick Harper  
Nick Harper
almost 10 years ago
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13
196

Varicose Veins

A varicose vein is an abnormal dilation of the vessels that carry blood back to the heart. Although veins are located throughout the body, varicose veins are...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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13
296

Coronary Angioplasty and Stenting

Coronary angioplasty and stenting is done to open up blood vessels in the heart. You may need the procedure after a heart attack, or if your vessels are clog...  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
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13
239

Acute Pancreatitis

Acute Pancreatitis Instructional Tutorial Video CanadaQBank.com QBanks for AMC Exams, MCCEE, MCCQE & USMLE URL: http://youtu.be/WCRFRgWnpJA  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
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2337

What Stomas and and how can we tell them apart?

You're standing in your surgical finals looking at a patient with a stoma bag on the abdominal wall. The examiner is asking you what it is and why it is ther...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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11
260

Hernia

This file contains information about Hernia,its types,easy diagnostic points for different types of hernias and its treatment. Hope it will be helpful.  
Asra Iqbal
over 5 years ago
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11
244

Ed Gavagan: A story about knots and surgeons

One day, Ed Gavagan was sitting on the subway, watching two young med students practicing their knots. And a powerful memory washed over him -- of one shocking moment that changed his life forever. An unforgettable story of crime, skill and gratitude. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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11
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Boxmedicine - Gallstones

What are the complications of gallstones? In this tutorial you will learn how to answer this question, and you'll learn a little bit about the clinical features and aspects of management for all the problems those pesky stones can cause. More tutorials at www.boxmedicine.com.  
Mr Danny Sinitsky
over 5 years ago
Gcs
10
705

GCS score?

among all component in GCS (eye, verbal and motor), which is the most important component and why?  
malek ahmad
over 4 years ago
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296

Dysphagia slideshow: History, Examination, Management

This slideshow covers history taking and examination, management of dysphagia, with a focus on Oesophageal differentials  
Nicholas Shannon
over 4 years ago
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9
507

CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
almost 10 years ago
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9
139

Rotation in breast surgery

Comprehensive and succint notes from Breast surgery rotation  
Naz
almost 7 years ago
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305

A Comedy of Errors

Great people make mistakes. Unfortunately, medicine is a subject where mistakes are not tolerated. Doctors are supposed to be infallible; or, at least, that is the present dogma. Medical students regularly fall victim to expecting too much of themselves, but this is perhaps not a bad trait when enlisting as a doctor. If it weren’t for mistakes in our understanding, then we wouldn’t progress. Studying a BSc in Anatomy has exposed me to the real world of science – where the negative is just as important as the positive. What isn’t there is just as important as what is. If you look into the history of Anatomy, it truly is a comedy of errors. So, here are three top mistakes by three incredibly influential figures who still managed to be remembered for the right reasons. 3. A Fiery Stare Culprit: Alcmaeon of Croton Go back far enough and you’ll bump into someone called Alcmaeon. Around the 5th century, he was one of the first dissectors – but not an anatomist. Alcmaeon was concerned with human intellect and was desperately searching for the seat of the soul. He made a number of major errors - quite understandable for his time! Alcmaeon insisted that sleep occurs when the blood vessels filled and we wake when they empty. Perhaps the most outrageous today is the fact that he insisted the eyes contained water both fire and water… Don’t be quick to mock. Alcmaeon identified the optic tract, the brain as the seat of the mind (along with Herophilus) and the Eustachian tubes. 2. Heart to Heart Culprit: Claudius Galen Legend has it that Galen’s father had a dream in which an angel/deity visited him and told him that his son would be a great physician. That would have to make for a pretty impressive opening line in a personal statement by today’s standards. Galen was highly influential on modern day medicine and his treatise of Anatomy and healing lasted for over a thousand years. Many of Galen’s mistakes were due to his dissections of animals rather than humans. Unfortunately, dissection was banned in Galen’s day and where his job as physician to the gladiators provided some nice exposed viscera to study, it did not allow him to develop a solid foundation. Galen’s biggest mistake lay in the circulation. He was convinced that blood flowed in a back and forth, ebb-like motion between the chambers of the heart and that it was burnt by muscle for fuel. Many years later, great physician William Harvey proposed our modern understanding of circulation. 1. The Da Vinci Code Culprit: Leonardo Da Vinci If you had chance to see the Royal Collection’s latest exhibition then you were in for a treat. It showcased the somewhat overlooked anatomical sketches of Leonardo Da Vinci. A man renowned for his intelligence and creativity, Da Vinci also turns out to be a pretty impressive anatomist. In his sketches he produces some of the most advanced 3D representations of the human skeleton, muscles and various organs. One theory of his is, however, perplexing. In his sketches is a diagram of the spinal cord……linked to penis. That’s right, Da Vinci was convinced the two were connected (no sexist comments please) and that semen production occurred inside the brain and spinal cord, being stored and released at will. He can be forgiven for the fact that he remarkably corrected himself some years later. His contributions to human physiology are astounding for their time including identification of a ‘hierarchal’ nervous system, the concept of equal ‘inheritence’ and identification of the retina as a ‘light sensing organ’. The list of errors is endless. However, they’re not really errors. They’re signposts that people were thinking. All great people fail, otherwise they wouldn’t be great.  
Lucas Brammar
over 5 years ago
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9
394

Lower GI Bleeds Tutorial - including partial colectomy and disposition

This is a continuation of the GI bleed set of videos. The first one is on Upper GI bleeds.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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8
149

Colorectal surgery and stomas

A brief overview of some of the common colorectal operations and complications arising from them. An introduction to stomas and a comparision of the differences between colostomies and ileostomies as well as a few of their potential complications.  
Caroline Taylor
over 7 years ago
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8
342

Common station surgical stations for final year medical students

Key surgical topics that may come up in surgical osces  
Anisha Sukha
over 7 years ago
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One-handed reef knot

A detailed video on how to perform the one-handed reef knot.  
Dr Matt Jones
over 5 years ago
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8
256

Lego Surgery - Crohn's Disease, Small Bowel Resection

Welcome back to the LEGO Operating Room! In this episode, Dr Balfour discusses surgery for Crohn's Disease and explains the operation of a small bowel resect...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago