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Preview
8
361

Live Dissection of the Liver

After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to describe and identify gross anatomy of the liver.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
11
7
184

Episode 3. Neck Lumps (Part 1 of 2)

Video podcast on neck lumps, part 1  
Saran Shantikumar
about 9 years ago
Preview
7
138

Urological Cancer

Urological Cancer  
Stephen McAleer
over 6 years ago
Preview
7
113

UAB does virtual surgery with VIPAAR and Google Glass

A University of Alabama at Birmingham surgical team has performed one of the first surgeries using a virtual augmented reality technology from VIPAAR in conjunction…  
Vimeo
over 5 years ago
How to suction a tracheostomy tube
7
383

How to Suction a Tracheostomy Tube

Suction a tracheostomy tube in three steps.  
nursebuff.com
almost 4 years ago
Preview
7
154

Heart and coronary circulation - dissection

This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video, it...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
6
127

Anaesthesia choice in Total Hip Replacement

The choice of anaesthetic in primary total hip replacement surgery – which gives the best perioperative outcome?  
Zara Edwards
almost 11 years ago
Preview
6
216

Surgical knot tying

This is a really nice demonstration of some of the basic surgical knots. It is slowed down so that it is much easier to follow than the vast majority of videos on YouTube and I think it is a nice video  
Rhys Clement
over 9 years ago
Preview
6
132

What is the Whipple Procedure?

In this video, Washington University surgeon William Hawkins, MD, explains the Whipple procedure, which is performed to remove cancer from the head of the pancreas. Hawkins and his colleagues complete about 125 Whipples a year, making the Siteman Cancer Center one of the highest-volume centers for this type of surgery nationwide. These surgeons pioneered a modification to the Whipple procedure that has resulted in the lowest fistula rate any large group (1.5 percent compared to 15 percent).  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
Preview
6
178

The Surgery Rotation

University of Pennsylvania Medical School Spoof 2004 video about the surgery clerkship. In part because of this video, and in part because of too many students failing the shelf (final exam), the clerkship was changed.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1n1xn42?1444773927
6
123

Successful liver transplantation using Facebook

In January 2012 I wrote about a girl who had created a Facebook page because she urgently needed a liver. In August 2004 I had a car accident in Germany, where damaged my limbs and some of my internal organs. That's why I need a liver URGENTLY! Over 26.000 people (family members, doctors, nurses, her friends and students from all parts of the country) followed and liked her page in 3 months. Finally she'd found a suitable liver, and she is fine now. I believe that our generation of health care professionals should be prepared for this and should provide meaningful help, because in the future we can not avoid patients who are interested in social media. E-patients will increasingly use web 2.0 tools as part of their health management and we must respond to that.  
Zoltán Cserháti
over 6 years ago
Preview
6
131

Sequential graft in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Selective graft angiogram after coronary artery bypass graft surgery to demonstrate sequential graft  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
10
5
97

Episode 4. Neck Lumps (Part 2 of 2)

The second part of the video podcast on neck lumps  
Saran Shantikumar
about 9 years ago
Preview
5
149

Femoral Nerve Block – A Guide for Medial Students and Junior Doctors.

I completed this article in collaboration with a senor registrar whilst studying as an undergraduate medical student in Dundee. This article outlines the proposed introduction of a technique that employs ultrasound to visualise the femoral nerve whilst performing a femoral nerve block. This procedure is performed on patients in both the emergency dept and surgical theatres. Traditionally this procedure has been performed using a 'blind technique' which has an increased association with side effects including inadvertent damage to local structures and systemic toxicity related to local anaesthetic. In the article we give a brief outline of both the the traditional and ultrasound guided techniques and allow readers to understand the benefits of using the proposed technique. We believe that this article will be of great interest to senior medical student and junior doctors who are interested in careers in emergency medicine and anaesthesia. This  
michael jamison
about 7 years ago
Preview
5
64

Regional vs. General Anesthesia in Hip Surgery

 Why this topic?  Why choose this topic?  General information  Regional anaesthesia and its modes of usage  Common anaesthetic agents used  How do the an…  
Debkumar Chowdhury
over 6 years ago
Preview
5
198

Hartmann's Procedure Explained

Eponymously named operations give you little clue as to what they are or what they're for. One of the most commonly performed eponymous procedures is Hartman...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 yurv3e?1444774179
5
130

What it means to be an Australian with skin cancer

Each year on the 26th of January, Australia Day, Australians of all shapes, sizes and political persuasions are encouraged to reflect on what it means to be living in this big, brown, sunny land of ours. It is a time to acknowledge past wrongs, honour outstanding Australians, welcome new citizens, and perhaps toss a lamb chop on the barbie (barbecue), enjoying the great Australian summer. It is also a time to count our blessings. Australians whinge a lot about our health system. While I am certainly not suggesting the model we have is anywhere near perfect, it could be a whole lot worse. I recently read this NY times article which talks about the astronomical and ever-rising health care costs in the US and suggests that this, at least sometimes, involves a lack of informed consent (re: costs and alternative treatment options). The US is certainly not the “land of the free” when it comes to health care. There are many factors involved, not least being the trend in the US to provide specialised care for conditions that are competently and cost-effectively dealt with in primary care (by GPs) in Australia. The article gives examples such as a five minute consult conducted by a dermatologist, during which liquid nitrogen was applied to a wart, costing the patient $500. In Australia, (if bulk billed by a GP) it would have cost the patient nothing and the taxpayer $16.60 (slightly higher if the patient was a pensioner). It describes a benign mole shaved off by a nurse practitioner (with a scalpel, no stitches) costing the patient $914.56. In Australia, it could be done for under $50. The most staggering example of all was the description of the treatment of a small facial Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) which cost over $25000 (no, that is not a typo – twenty five THOUSAND dollars). In Australia, it would probably have cost the taxpayer less than $200 for its removal (depending on exact size, location and method of closure). The patient interviewed for the article was sent for Mohs surgery (and claims she was not given a choice in the matter). Mohs (pronounced “Moe’s” as in Moe’s Tavern from The Simpsons) is a highly effective technique for treating skin cancer and minimises the loss of non-cancerous tissue (in traditional skin cancer surgery you deliberately remove some of the surrounding normal skin to ensure you’ve excised all of the cancerous cells) . Wikipedia entry on Mohs. This can be of great benefit in a small minority of cancers. However, this super-specialised technique is very expensive and time/ labour intensive. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it has become extremely popular in the US. ”Moh’s for everything” seems to be the new catch cry when it comes to skin cancer treatment in the US. In the past two years, working very part time in skin cancer medicine in Australia, I have diagnosed literally hundreds of BCCs (Basal Cell Carcinomas). The vast majority of these I successfully treated (ie cured) in our practice without needing any specialist help. A handful were referred to general or plastic surgeons and one, only one, was referred for Mohs surgery. The nearest Mohs surgeon being 200 kilometres away from our clinic may have something to do with the low referral rate, but the fact remains, most BCCs (facial or otherwise), can be cured and have a good cosmetic outcome, without the need for Mohs surgery. To my mind, using Mohs on garden variety BCCs is like employing a team of chefs to come into your kitchen each morning to place bread in your toaster and then butter it for you. Overkill. Those soaking up some fine Aussie sunshine on the beach or at a backyard barbie with friends this Australia Day, gifting their skin with perfect skin-cancer-growing conditions, may wish to give thanks that when their BCCs bloom, affordable (relative to costs in the US, at least) treatment is right under their cancerous noses. Being the skin cancer capital of the world is perhaps not a title of which Australians should be proud, but the way we can treat them effectively, without breaking the bank, should be. Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
over 5 years ago