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The Design and Validation of an Optical Coherence Tomography-Based Classification System for Focal Vitreomacular Traction: Abstract & Introduction

Abstract & Introduction: A simple validated classification system for focal vitreomacular traction syndrome, based on optical coherence tomography and hierarchically classifying 7 features of the syndrome, should facilitate decision making and prognostication.  
medscape.org
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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Second test for Down’s syndrome is recommended for NHS

A second, non-invasive test for Down’s syndrome has been recommended to form part of the fetal anomaly screening programme in England. If the government approves the change it will mean fewer women will need to undergo invasive diagnostic tests, which carry a small associated risk of miscarriage.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Long-QT Syndrome Overdiagnosed, Overtreated in Cohort Study

It's a difficult diagnosis, and there are valid concerns about missing it, which can lead to overdiagnosis and maybe "overaggressive treatment, including overzealous implantation of an ICD."  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Depression (mood) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, feelings and sense of well-being.[1][2] People with a depressed mood can feel sad, anxious, empty, hopeless, helpless, worthless, guilty, irritable, ashamed or restless. They may lose interest in activities that were once pleasurable, experience loss of appetite or overeating, have problems concentrating, remembering details or making decisions, and may contemplate, attempt or commit suicide. Insomnia, excessive sleeping, fatigue, aches, pains, digestive problems or reduced energy may also be present.[3] Depressed mood is a feature of some psychiatric syndromes such as major depressive disorder,[2] but it may also be a normal reaction to life events such as grief, a symptom of some bodily ailments or a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 4 years ago
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Management of lumbar spinal stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200 000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Management of lumbar spinal stenosis

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200 000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Post Intensive Care Syndrome [PICS] - Intensive Care Network

Post Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) is a phenomenon that leaves some ICU survivors wishing they were dead. We need to understand more to improve our care.  
intensivecarenetwork.com
over 4 years ago
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Epidermal Necrolysis: 60 Years of Errors and Advances

This review describes the classification and misclassification of syndromes producing epidermal necrolysis, identifying priorities and challenges in their understanding and management.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Episode 40 – Femoral Nerve Blocks & Compartment Syndrome

Source: Episode 40 – Femoral Nerve Blocks & Compartment Syndrome  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
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California Details 59 Cases of Rare Polio-like Syndrome

Most cases of a rare polio-like syndrome have occurred in children and young adults and the precise cause remains unclear, although a viral cause is highly suspected.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Thyroid Function and Metabolic Syndrome

Is there an association between thyroid dysfunction and the development of metabolic syndrome? This study investigates the possible connection.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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Income, Education Affect Metabolic Risk During Menopause

As income, education, and regular exercise go down and BMI goes up, women's risk for metabolic syndrome increases between ages 45 to 55 years, regardless of menopausal status.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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Management of chronic refractory cough

Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Management of chronic refractory cough

Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Oral Allergy Syndrome: When an Apple a Day Is Not Advised

What is the potential for anaphylaxis in oral allergy syndrome?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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10

Autoimmune Epilepsy Gaining Attention

Researchers are learning more about antibodies that attack the brain, causing various seizure syndromes.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
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MRCPCH: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome by MrcpchTeam

I have discussed only important points you need to know for MRCPCH examination, hope it will benefit you thank you. SUBSCRIBE NOW: http://bit.ly/161OmbF  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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USMLE: What you need to know about Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH) by usmlepoint

I have discussed only imp points you need to know for usmle examination, hope it will benefit you thank you SUBSCRIBE NOW: http://bit.ly/161OmbF  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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Improving Outcomes in Congenital and Acquired Lipodystrophy: Best Practices in Diagnosis and Management CME

This educational activity is targeted to an audience of endocrinologists and other healthcare providers involved in the diagnosis and management of the heterogeneous group of disorders referred to as lipodystrophy syndromes.  
medscape.org
over 4 years ago
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43

Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Preterm premature rupture of membranes is the rupture of membranes during pregnancy before 37 weeks' gestation. It occurs in 3 percent of pregnancies and is the cause of approximately one third of preterm deliveries. It can lead to significant perinatal morbidity, including respiratory distress syndrome, neonatal sepsis, umbilical cord prolapse, placental abruption, and fetal death. Appropriate evaluation and management are important for improving neonatal outcomes. Speculum examination to determine cervical dilation is preferred because digital examination is associated with a decreased latent period and with the potential for adverse sequelae. Treatment varies depending on gestational age and includes consideration of delivery when rupture of membranes occurs at or after 34 weeks' gestation. Corticosteroids can reduce many neonatal complications, particularly intraventricular hemorrhage and respiratory distress syndrome, and antibiotics are effective for increasing the latency period.  
aafp.org
over 4 years ago