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Conn's Syndrome | almostadoctor

Conn’s Syndrome: This is basically primary hyperaldosteronism. It will cause hypernatreamia and hypokalaemia. It is a recognised cause of hypertension – but it is rare. It can also cause alkylosis (due to the exchange of sodium for hydrogen by some channels in the tubule). This links to brief synopsis of Conn's Syndrome on almostadoctor.co.uk  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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30

Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH Secretion (SIADH)

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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39

Wernicke's Encephelopathy and Korsakoff's Syndrome

Wernicke’s Encephalopathy This is a disorder that occurs as a result of inadequate levels of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the body. It results in: Ataxia Ophthalmoplegia Nystagmus – may be horizontal and vertical  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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41

Goodpasture’s syndrome (anti-GBM antibody disease)

  This is a rare, genetic, autoimmune condition characterised by a combination of glomerulonephritis with alveolar hemorrhage in the presence of circulating anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies.  Circulating anti-GBM antibodies bind to basement membranes in the kidneys and lungs, fix complement and trigger a cell-mediated inflammatory response, causing glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis.    Specific predisposing factors include the following: Association with HLA-DR2  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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52

Fifth Disease

Fifth Disease - so called as it was the fifth of the six common childhood skin rashes when it was first classified back in the 18th and 19th centuries. Formally known as Erythema Infectiosum and also colloquially called slapped cheek syndrome. Aietiology and Epidemiology  Caused by infection with Parvovirus B19 (aka erythrovirus)    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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18

Fragile X Syndrome (Martin-Bell Syndrome)

So called as there is a ‘fragile site’ on the X chromosome. This is a non-staining, weakened section of the chromosome which is susceptible to breaking. It is an example of a trinucleotide expansion mutation, but is usually inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern.  Fragile X syndrome is the second most common cause of genetic learning difficulty after Down’s Syndrome.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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22

Coarctation of the aorta

Coarctation of the aorta – L-to-R shunt – ACYANOTIC Accounts for up to 10% of congential heart defects Male:female ratio is 2:1 Affects 10-20% of patients with Turner’s Syndrome Almost always affects the thoracic aorta, virtually never the abdominal   Clinical features  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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2
66

Congenital Cyanotic Heart Disease

Congenital cyanotic heart disease – aka blue baby syndrome These account for about 25% of all congenital heart defects   Causes – there are lots more! In the exam, you might be asked to examine a child, and be expected to come to a conclusion of ‘congenital cyanotic heart disease’, and then give a few examples of what can cause it:  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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60

Eponymous Psychiatric Syndromes

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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2

Spare Part Syndrome

Gastro ward: Year 3  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
about 6 years ago
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22

Infection with polyomavirus JC

The recent discovery of new neurological syndromes that result from neuronal infection with polyomavirus JC, also known as JC virus, and the presence of this virus in the grey matter are currently under debate.1 It has been suggested that JC virus is associated with cognitive decline, dementia, strokes, and brain tumours,2 and this hypothesis has been commented on in the BMJ.3  
bmj.com
about 6 years ago
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9

WHO voices concern over rising numbers of MERS-CoV cases

The World Health Organization has expressed concern over the rising number of cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in recent weeks, particularly in the light of two significant outbreaks at healthcare facilities in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.  
bmj.com
about 6 years ago
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35

OSCE-Aid : the online revision community for medical students and junior doctors

Our 'Common Cases' series are lecture presentations which cover the most common diseases and syndromes which are found in each of the systems examinations sessions in OSCE exams. These presentations form the lecture component of our annual revision courses. We hope that they are useful to help revise the main signs and important discussion points for each condition.  
osce-aid.co.uk
about 6 years ago
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32

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
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Mum's decision to save only one twin

A mother who refused life-saving treatment for one of her unborn twins in order to save the other is calling for better information on the dangers of slapped cheek syndrome.  
BBC News
about 6 years ago
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22

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
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1
19

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
Preview
1
54

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
Preview
1
15

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
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1
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An unusual variant of Guillain–Barré syndrome, and dopamine dysregulation syndrome

Stream An unusual variant of Guillain–Barré syndrome, and dopamine dysregulation syndrome by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 6 years ago